Piezoelectric Actuators and Sensors: Materials, Devices and Applications, 2nd Edition

A special issue of Micromachines (ISSN 2072-666X). This special issue belongs to the section "A:Physics".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 15 October 2024 | Viewed by 3923

Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
Director of Smart Materials & Intelligent Systems (SMIS) Laboratory, Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Old Dominion University, Norfolk, VA 23529, USA
Interests: piezoelectric material and devices; smart systems; sensor and actuators; acoustic transducers; renewable energy; ocean wave energy
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Over the last century, piezoelectric sensors and actuators have played a serial and important role in the development of novel wave technology, including significant contributions such as: (i) the invention of the piezoelectric ultrasonic transducer for under water detection to significantly increase the survival capabilities of warships since World War I; (ii) advanced controls for nuclear weapons since the 1940s; (iii) precision controls for microelectronic processing equipment to revolutionize semiconductor technology in the 1960s; (iv) piezoelectric transducers actualizing a revolution in recent decades in medical instrumentation used for ultrasonics, CTs, etc.; (v) piezoelectric sensors, such as stress, strain, force and pressure sensors, broadly being used in various industries; (vi) piezoelectric sensors and actuators allowing for modern automobile vehicles to become safer, more reliable and energy efficient; (vi) piezoelectric sensors and actuators allowing for the incorporation of more robotics in aircraft; (vii) piezoelectric sensors and actuators being broadly used for space explorations and portable military intelligent devices. Today, advanced manufacturing and microelectronic development have led to most piezoelectric device concepts becoming micromachinable, with the aim of playing a higher role in the development of technology for smart cities, the Internet of Things and Industry 4.0.  Therefore, this Special Issue seeks to showcase research papers, communications and, especially, review articles focusing on piezoelectric materials, piezoelectric devices and their various applications. 

Dr. Tian-Bing Xu
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • piezoelectric materials
  • piezoelectric multilayer stacks and structures
  • piezoelectric sensors
  • piezoelectric actuators
  • piezoelectric transducers
  • piezoelectric vibrators nano, micro, additive and 3D printing manufacturing technologies for micromachined piezoelectric materials and devices
  • piezoelectric device applications

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Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

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20 pages, 1593 KiB  
Article
Integration Technology with Thin Films Co-Fabricated in Laminated Composite Structures for Defect Detection and Damage Monitoring
by Rogers K. Langat, Emmanuel De Luycker, Arthur Cantarel and Micky Rakotondrabe
Micromachines 2024, 15(2), 274; https://doi.org/10.3390/mi15020274 - 15 Feb 2024
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Abstract
Despite the well-established nature of non-destructive testing (NDT) technologies, autonomous monitoring systems are still in high demand. The solution lies in harnessing the potential of intelligent structures, particularly in industries like aeronautics. Substantial downtime occurs due to routine maintenance, leading to lost revenue [...] Read more.
Despite the well-established nature of non-destructive testing (NDT) technologies, autonomous monitoring systems are still in high demand. The solution lies in harnessing the potential of intelligent structures, particularly in industries like aeronautics. Substantial downtime occurs due to routine maintenance, leading to lost revenue when aircraft are grounded for inspection and repairs. This article explores an innovative approach using intelligent materials to enhance condition-based maintenance, ultimately cutting life-cycle costs. The study emphasizes a paradigm shift toward structural health monitoring (SHM), utilizing embedded sensors for real-time monitoring. Active thin film piezoelectric materials are proposed for their integration into composite structures. The work evaluates passive sensing through acoustic emission (AE) signals and active sensing using Lamb wave propagation, presenting amplitude-based and frequency domain approaches for damage detection. A comprehensive signal processing approach is presented, and the damage index and damage size correlation function are introduced to enable continuous monitoring due to their sensitivity to changes in material properties and defect severity. Additionally, finite element modeling and experimental validation are proposed to enhance their understanding and applicability. This research contributes to developing more efficient and cost-effective aircraft maintenance approaches through SHM, addressing the competitive demands of the aeronautic industry. Full article
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19 pages, 12908 KiB  
Article
A 3D-Printed Piezoelectric Microdevice for Human Energy Harvesting for Wearable Biosensors
by Ihor Sobianin, Sotiria D. Psoma and Antonios Tourlidakis
Micromachines 2024, 15(1), 118; https://doi.org/10.3390/mi15010118 - 10 Jan 2024
Viewed by 1344
Abstract
The human body is a source of multiple types of energy, such as mechanical, thermal and biochemical, which can be scavenged through appropriate technological means. Mechanical vibrations originating from contraction and expansion of the radial artery represent a reliable source of displacement to [...] Read more.
The human body is a source of multiple types of energy, such as mechanical, thermal and biochemical, which can be scavenged through appropriate technological means. Mechanical vibrations originating from contraction and expansion of the radial artery represent a reliable source of displacement to be picked up and exploited by a harvester. The continuous monitoring of physiological biomarkers is an essential part of the timely and accurate diagnosis of a disease with subsequent medical treatment, and wearable biosensors are increasingly utilized for biomedical data acquisition of important biomarkers. However, they rely on batteries and their replacement introduces a discontinuity in measured signals, which could be critical for the patients and also causes discomfort. In the present work, the research into a novel 3D-printed wearable energy harvesting platform for scavenging energy from arterial pulsations via a piezoelectric material is described. An elastic thermoplastic polyurethane (TPU) film, which forms an air chamber between the skin and the piezoelectric disc electrode, was introduced to provide better adsorption to the skin, prevent damage to the piezoelectric disc and electrically isolate components in the platform from the human body. Computational fluid dynamics in the framework of COMSOL Multiphysics 6.1 software was employed to perform a series of coupled time-varying simulations of the interaction among a number of associated physical phenomena. The mathematical model of the harvester was investigated computationally, and quantification of the output energy and power parameters was used for comparisons. A prototype wearable platform enclosure was designed and manufactured using fused filament fabrication (FFF). The influence of the piezoelectric disc material and its diameter on the electrical output were studied and various geometrical parameters of the enclosure and the TPU film were optimized based on theoretical and empirical data. Physiological data, such as interdependency between the harvester skin fit and voltage output, were obtained. Full article
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Review

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22 pages, 4923 KiB  
Review
Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems Microphones: A Brief Review Emphasizing Recent Advances in Audible Spectrum Applications
by Zhuoyue Zheng, Chen Wang, Linlin Wang, Zeyu Ji, Xiaoxiao Song, Pui-In Mak, Huafeng Liu and Yuan Wang
Micromachines 2024, 15(3), 352; https://doi.org/10.3390/mi15030352 - 29 Feb 2024
Viewed by 1489
Abstract
The MEMS microphone is a representative device among the MEMS family, which has attracted substantial research interest, and those tailored for human voice have earned distinct success in commercialization. Although sustained development persists, challenges such as residual stress, environmental noise, and structural innovation [...] Read more.
The MEMS microphone is a representative device among the MEMS family, which has attracted substantial research interest, and those tailored for human voice have earned distinct success in commercialization. Although sustained development persists, challenges such as residual stress, environmental noise, and structural innovation are posed. To collect and summarize the recent advances in this subject, this paper presents a concise review concerning the transduction mechanism, diverse mechanical structure topologies, and effective methods of noise reduction for high-performance MEMS microphones with a dynamic range akin to the audible spectrum, aiming to provide a comprehensive and adequate analysis of this scope. Full article
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