Methane Oxidation Catalysis

A special issue of Methane (ISSN 2674-0389).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 December 2022) | Viewed by 8372

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Department of Natural Sciences, Manchester Metropolitan University, All Saints Building, Manchester M15 6BH, UK
Interests: emissions control technologies; nanoporous materials and het-erogeneous catalysis; low carbon fuels; additive manufacturing

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Natural Sciences, Manchester Metropolitan University, All Saints Building, Manchester M15 6BH, UK
Interests: zeolites and related nanoporous materials; catalysis; methane emissions
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Methane is the simplest saturated hydrocarbon and its oxidation using catalysts continues to attract much attention. The transformation of methane may occur via (i) total oxidation, e.g., to remove methane from engine exhaust emissions; or (ii) partial oxidation to produce value-added chemicals, e.g., syn-gas and methanol (and products of their reactions), which can be used in the energy and chemical industries. Shale bed fracking has brought about a plentiful supply of methane from extraction of natural gas. It is also possible to produce biomethane renewably using biological processes that consume far less net carbon than fossil fuels. Taken together, methane will continue to be an important hydrocarbon reagent for the foreseeable future. In this Special Issue, we invite contributions of original research from all areas of the catalyzed oxidation of methane. Topics include, but are not limited to, the total and/or partial oxidation of methane using chemical catalysis, electrocatalysis, photocatalysis and enzyme catalysis, catalyst design, catalyst characterization, model catalysts, and theoretical methods.

Dr. Aidan Doyle
Dr. Lubomira Tosheva
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Methane is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

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Keywords

  • methane oxidation
  • catalyst design
  • catalyst characterization
  • model catalysts

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

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10 pages, 4529 KiB  
Article
Morphology-Controlled WO3 for the Photocatalytic Oxidation of Methane to Methanol in Mild Conditions
by Dumindu Premachandra and Michael D. Heagy
Methane 2023, 2(1), 103-112; https://doi.org/10.3390/methane2010008 - 17 Feb 2023
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 1718
Abstract
Since WO3 is a relatively abundant metal oxide and features the ability to absorb in the visible spectrum, this non-toxic semiconductor is a promising photocatalyst among sustainable materials. These properties have delivered intriguing catalytic results in the conversion of methane to methanol; [...] Read more.
Since WO3 is a relatively abundant metal oxide and features the ability to absorb in the visible spectrum, this non-toxic semiconductor is a promising photocatalyst among sustainable materials. These properties have delivered intriguing catalytic results in the conversion of methane to methanol; however, initial investigations indicate low photocatalytic efficiency resulting from fast recombination of photogenerated charges. To explore this aspect of inefficiency, five different morphologies of WO3 consisting of micron, nanopowder, rods, wires, and flowers were obtained and characterized. In addition, several electron capture agents/oxidizers were investigated as a means of improving the separation of photogenerated charges. The photocatalytic activity of different morphologies was assessed via CH3OH formation rates. Based on our results, WO3 flowers produced the highest methanol productivity (38.17 ± 3.24 µmol/g-h) when 2 mM H2O2 was present, which is approximately four times higher in the absence of H2O2. This higher methanol production has been attributed to the unique structure-related properties of the flower-like structure. Photoluminescence emission spectra and diffuse reflectance data reveal that flower structures are highly catalytic due to their reduced electron/hole recombination and multiple light reflections via petal-like hollow chambers. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Methane Oxidation Catalysis)
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Review

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20 pages, 1821 KiB  
Review
Fisher–Tropsch Synthesis for Conversion of Methane into Liquid Hydrocarbons through Gas-to-Liquids (GTL) Process: A Review
by Farah T. Alsudani, Abdullah N. Saeed, Nisreen S. Ali, Hasan Sh. Majdi, Hussein G. Salih, Talib M. Albayati, Noori M. Cata Saady and Zaidoon M. Shakor
Methane 2023, 2(1), 24-43; https://doi.org/10.3390/methane2010002 - 4 Jan 2023
Cited by 10 | Viewed by 5991
Abstract
The interest in Gas-to-Liquid technology (GTL) is growing worldwide because it involves a two-step indirect conversion of natural gas to higher hydrocarbons ranging from Liquefied Petroleum Gas (LPG) to paraffin wax. GTL makes it possible to obtain clean diesel, naphtha, lubes, olefins, and [...] Read more.
The interest in Gas-to-Liquid technology (GTL) is growing worldwide because it involves a two-step indirect conversion of natural gas to higher hydrocarbons ranging from Liquefied Petroleum Gas (LPG) to paraffin wax. GTL makes it possible to obtain clean diesel, naphtha, lubes, olefins, and other industrially important organics from natural gas. This article is a brief review discussing the state-of-the-art of GTL, including the basics of syngas manufacturing as a source for Fischer-Tropsch synthesis (FTS), hydrocarbons synthesis (Fischer-Tropsch process), and product upgrading. Each one is analyzed, and the main characteristics of traditional and catalysts technologies are presented. For syngas generation, steam methane reforming, partial oxidation, two-step reforming, and autothermal reforming of methane are discussed. For Fischer–Tropsch, we highlight the role of catalysis and selectivity to high molecular weight hydrocarbons. Also, new reactors technologies, such as microreactors, are presented. The GTL technology still faces several challenges; the biggest is obtaining the right H2:CO ratio when using a low steam-to-carbon ratio. Despite the great understanding of the carbon formation mechanism, little has been made in developing newer catalysts. Since 60–70% of a GTL plant cost is for syngas production, it needs more attention, particularly for developing the catalytic partial oxidation process (CPO), given that modern CPO processes using a ceramic membrane reactor reduce the plant’s capital cost. Improving the membrane’s mechanical, thermal, and chemical stability can commercialize the process. Catalytic challenges accompanying the FTS need attention to enhance the selectivity to produce high-octane gasoline, lower the production cost, develop new reactor systems, and enhance the selectivity to produce high molecular weight hydrocarbons. Catalytically, more attention should be given to the generation of a convenient catalyst layer and the coating process for a given configuration. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Methane Oxidation Catalysis)
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