Microstructure and Properties of Metallic Materials Produced by Additive Manufacturing

A special issue of Metals (ISSN 2075-4701). This special issue belongs to the section "Additive Manufacturing".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 October 2023) | Viewed by 3882

Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
School of Engineering and Information Technology (SEIT), University of New South Wales Canberra, Canberra, ACT 2600, Australia
Interests: modelling for additive manufacturing; multiscale methods; computational materials science; computational mechanics; processing-microstructure-property relationships in metal additive manufacturing

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Metals is launching a new exciting Special Issue entitled “Microstructure and Properties of Metallic Materials produced by Additive Manufacturing”, and we would like to invite you to contribute to it. The Special Issue will provide a platform for the publication and dissemination of the latest experimental and theoretical results in the innovative field of metal 3D printing, with a focus on the microstructure and properties of additively manufactured metals and alloys. Studies combining simulations and experiments are highly welcomed.

I would be delighted if you would be willing to contribute an original or review article to this Special Issue.

Dr. Olga Zinovieva
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

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Keywords

  • additive manufacturing
  • 3D printing
  • microstructure
  • properties
  • metals and alloys

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

32 pages, 27453 KiB  
Article
The Effects of Layer Thickness on the Mechanical Properties of Additive Friction Stir Deposition-Fabricated Aluminum Alloy 6061 Parts
by Hamed Ghadimi, Mojtaba Talachian, Huan Ding, Selami Emanet and Shengmin Guo
Metals 2024, 14(1), 101; https://doi.org/10.3390/met14010101 - 14 Jan 2024
Viewed by 1378
Abstract
Solid-state additive friction stir deposition (AFSD) is a thermomechanical-based additive manufacturing technique. For this study, AFSD was utilized to produce aluminum alloy 6061 (AA6061) blocks with varying layer thicknesses (1 mm, 2 mm, and 3 mm). The mechanical properties were assessed through uniaxial [...] Read more.
Solid-state additive friction stir deposition (AFSD) is a thermomechanical-based additive manufacturing technique. For this study, AFSD was utilized to produce aluminum alloy 6061 (AA6061) blocks with varying layer thicknesses (1 mm, 2 mm, and 3 mm). The mechanical properties were assessed through uniaxial tensile tests and Vickers microhardness measurement, and statistical analysis was employed to investigate differences among data groups. The results revealed that the deposition layer thickness influences tensile properties in the building (Z) direction, while the properties in the X and Y directions showed minor differences across the three AFSD blocks. Furthermore, variations in tensile properties were observed depending on the sample orientation in the AFSD blocks and its depth-wise position in the part in the building direction. The microhardness values decreased non-linearly along the building direction, spread across the width of the part’s cross-section, and highlighted that the deposition layer thickness significantly affects this property. The 1 mm block exhibited lower average microhardness values than the 2 mm and 3 mm blocks. The temperature histories and dynamic heat treatment are influenced by the deposition layer thickness and depend on the location of the point being studied in the part, resulting in variations in the microstructure and mechanical properties along the building direction and across the part’s width. Full article
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14 pages, 22422 KiB  
Article
Analysis of Face-Centered Cubic Phase in Additively Manufactured Commercially Pure Ti
by Claire L. Adams and David P. Field
Metals 2023, 13(12), 2005; https://doi.org/10.3390/met13122005 - 13 Dec 2023
Viewed by 1084
Abstract
Metal additive manufacturing is a developing technique with numerous advantages and challenges to overcome. As with all manufacturing techniques, the specific raw materials and processing parameters used have a profound influence on microstructures and the resulting behavior of materials. It is important to [...] Read more.
Metal additive manufacturing is a developing technique with numerous advantages and challenges to overcome. As with all manufacturing techniques, the specific raw materials and processing parameters used have a profound influence on microstructures and the resulting behavior of materials. It is important to understand the relationship between processing and microstructures of Ti to advance knowledge of Ti-alloys in the additive field. In this study, a face-centered cubic (FCC) phase was found in grade 2 commercially pure titanium specimens, additively manufactured with directed energy deposition in an argon atmosphere. Two scanning speeds (500 and 1000 mm/min) and three scanning patterns (cross-hatched and unidirectional patterns) were investigated. Electron backscatter diffraction and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy were used for microstructural and compositional analysis. Inverse pole figure, phase, and kernel average misorientation (KAM) maps were analyzed in this work. Larger amounts of the FCC phase were found in the unidirectional scanning patterns for the slower scanning speed, while the cross-hatched pattern for both scanning speeds showed a lower amount of FCC. Higher KAM averages were present in the faster scanning speed specimens. According to EDS scans, small amounts of nitrogen were uniformly distributed throughout the specimens, leading to the possibility of interstitial content as a contributing factor for development of the observed FCC phase. However, there is no clear relationship between nitrogen and the FCC phase. The formation of this FCC phase could be connected to high densities of crystalline defects from processing, plastic deformation, or the distribution of interstitials in the AM structure. An unexpected Kurdjumow–Sachs-type orientation relationship between the parent beta phase and FCC phase was found, as 110BCC111FCC, 111BCC110FCC. Full article
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16 pages, 3254 KiB  
Article
Ratcheting–Fatigue Damage Assessment of Additively Manufactured SS304L and AlSi10Mg Samples under Asymmetric Stress Cycles
by M. Servatan, S. M. Hashemi and A. Varvani-Farahani
Metals 2023, 13(9), 1534; https://doi.org/10.3390/met13091534 - 30 Aug 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 963
Abstract
The present study aims to investigate the interaction of ratcheting and fatigue phenomena for additively manufactured (AM) samples of SS304L and AlSi10Mg undergoing uniaxial asymmetric stress cycles. Overall damage was accumulated through fatigue and ratcheting on AM samples prepared from three-dimensional-printed plates along [...] Read more.
The present study aims to investigate the interaction of ratcheting and fatigue phenomena for additively manufactured (AM) samples of SS304L and AlSi10Mg undergoing uniaxial asymmetric stress cycles. Overall damage was accumulated through fatigue and ratcheting on AM samples prepared from three-dimensional-printed plates along vertical and horizontal directions. Fatigue damage was evaluated based on the strain energy density fatigue approach and ratcheting damage was calculated through use of an isotropic–kinematic hardening framework. The isotropic description through the Lee–Zavrel (L–Z) model formed the initial and concentric expansion of yield surfaces while the Ahmadzadeh–Varvani (A–V) kinematic hardening rule translated yield surfaces into the deviatoric stress space. Ratcheting of AM samples was simulated using finite element analysis through use of triangular and quadrilateral elements. Ratcheting values of the AM samples were simulated on the basis of Chaboche’s materials model. The predicted and simulated ratcheting damage curves placed above the experimental fatigue–ratcheting experimental data while predicted fatigue damage curves collapsed below the measured values. The overall damage was formulated to partition damage weights due to fatigue and ratcheting phenomena. Full article
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