materials-logo

Journal Browser

Journal Browser

Bioresources as Precursor for Novel Nanostructured Materials towards Environmental Remediation (Volume II)

A special issue of Materials (ISSN 1996-1944). This special issue belongs to the section "Advanced Nanomaterials and Nanotechnology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (10 March 2024) | Viewed by 3316

Special Issue Editors


E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Environmental & Radioanalytical Chemistry Lab, Department of Chemistry, University of Cyprus, P.O. Box 20537, 1678 Nicosia, Cyprus
Interests: (radio)toxic inorganic species; bioactive chelating ligands; natural organic matter; metal oxides; mineral surfaces; lanthanides; actinides; humic acids; biomass by-products; pollutant monitoring on ground and sea waters; water purification; plant fibres
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Associate Professor, Faculty of Chemistry, Maria Curie-Sklodowska University, 3/536, Maria Curie-Skłodowska Sq. 3, 20-031 Lublin, Poland
Interests: adsorption processes for environmental protection; porous hybrid materials; tailored surface modification; nanomaterials and nanocomposites; silica- and carbon-based functional materials
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department Chemistry, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, 54124 Thessaloniki, Greece
Interests: synthesis and characterization of novel multifunctional nanocomposites; application of active phases to textiles/fabrics; (photo)catalytic detoxification of chemical warfare agent vapors or droplets; adsorption of organic compounds from liquid phases; photo- and chemo-catalytic valorization/oxidation of biomass-obtained model compounds; desulfurization of biofuels; colorimetric detection of toxic vapors
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The utilization of environmentally benign abundant and renewable materials on the way to a sustainable future is urgent to deal with the reality of the ongoing environmental crisis. Among all possible approaches, the synthesis of desirable materials by recycling bioresources is a fascinating and promising strategy, while their use for environment-oriented applications further enhances circular economy and sustainability. Wastewater treatment for modern societies is of great demand in order to overcome the pollution resulting from industrial and municipality activity. Various technologies are successfully employed towards water remediation, with adsorptive approaches regarded as effective and promising. Among the plethora of materials utilized in real-life decontamination applications, carbonaceous materials attract interest predominantly as adsorption media due to their affinity for various pollutants. However, they still have some drawbacks and limitations to their application, and their removal capabilities can further be enhanced. Tuning crucial characteristics such as the textural features and surface chemistry heterogeneity can lead to better-performing materials, especially from the perspective of adsorptive removal. A novel trend is the establishment of multifunctional materials that not only retain the pollutants but also possess the ability to either decompose or mineralize them catalytically. The incorporation and nano-engineering of the already efficient carbonaceous materials with reactive nanophases has gained the interest of the research community. Additionally, the usage of abundant bioresources such as biomass as feedstocks can further elevate the green-oriented nature of these media.  

Considering all the above, this Special Issue targets the latest trends and advances in carbonaceous nanostructured materials as well as nanocomposites for environment-oriented applications that reveal adsorptive and/or catalytic performances better than the currently used materials. Emphasis will be placed on biomass-derived materials, the reusability of the adsorbents, and on novel trends towards the enhancement of the catalytic/reactive decomposition or mineralization.

Prof. Dr. Ioannis Pashalidis
Dr. Ioannis Anastopoulos
Dr. Mariusz Barczak
Dr. Dimitrios Giannakoudakis
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Materials is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • carbonaceous materials
  • nanocomposites
  • adsorption
  • catalysis
  • biomass as a precursor

Published Papers (3 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

20 pages, 9111 KiB  
Article
Radionuclide Removal from Aqueous Solutions Using Oxidized Carbon Fabrics
by Ioannis Ioannidis, Ioannis Pashalidis, Batuhan Mulla, Gkerman Kotanidis, Kyriacos Ioannou, Georgios Constantinides, Nikolaos Kostoglou and Claus Rebholz
Materials 2023, 16(23), 7479; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma16237479 - 02 Dec 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1009
Abstract
The adsorption of actinide ions (Am(III) and U(VI)) from aqueous solutions using pristine and oxidized carbon fabrics was investigated by means of batch experiments at different pH values (pH 4, 7 and 9) and temperatures (25, 35 and 45 °C) under ambient atmospheric [...] Read more.
The adsorption of actinide ions (Am(III) and U(VI)) from aqueous solutions using pristine and oxidized carbon fabrics was investigated by means of batch experiments at different pH values (pH 4, 7 and 9) and temperatures (25, 35 and 45 °C) under ambient atmospheric conditions. The experimental results indicated that both the pH and the fabric texture affected the adsorption rate and the relative removal efficiency, which was 70% and 100% for Am(III) and U(VI), respectively. The Kd (L/kg) values for U(VI) were generally found to be higher (2 < log10(Kd)< 3) than the corresponding values for Am(III) adsorption (1.5 < log10(Kd) < 2). The data obtained from the experiments regarding the temperature effect implied that the relative adsorption for both actinides increases with temperature and that adsorption is an endothermic and entropy-driven reaction. The application of the fabrics to remove the two actinides from contaminated seawater samples showed that both the relative removal efficiency and the Kd values decreased significantly due to the presence of competitive cations (e.g., Ca2+ and Fe3+) and complexing anions (CO32−) in the respective waters. Nevertheless, the removal efficiency was still remarkable (50% and 90% for Am(III) and U(VI), respectively), demonstrating that these materials could be attractive candidates for the treatment of radionuclide/actinide-contaminated waters. Full article
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

16 pages, 3618 KiB  
Article
3D Composite U(VI) Adsorbents Based on Alginate Hydrogels and Oxidized Biochar Obtained from Luffa cylindrica
by Andreas Ayiotis, Efthalia Georgiou, Panagiotis S. Ioannou, Ioannis Pashalidis and Theodora Krasia-Christoforou
Materials 2023, 16(19), 6577; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma16196577 - 06 Oct 2023
Viewed by 786
Abstract
3D naturally derived composites consisting of calcium alginate hydrogels (CA) and oxidized biochar obtained from Luffa cylindrica (ox-LC) were synthesized and further evaluated as adsorbents for the removal of U(VI) from aqueous media. Batch-type experiments were conducted to investigate the effect of various [...] Read more.
3D naturally derived composites consisting of calcium alginate hydrogels (CA) and oxidized biochar obtained from Luffa cylindrica (ox-LC) were synthesized and further evaluated as adsorbents for the removal of U(VI) from aqueous media. Batch-type experiments were conducted to investigate the effect of various physicochemical parameters on the adsorption performance of materials. The maximum adsorption capacity (qmax) was 1.7 mol kg−1 (404.6 mg·g−1) at pH 3.0 for the CA/ox-LC with a 10% wt. ox-LC content. FTIR spectroscopy indicated the formation of inner-sphere complexes between U(VI) and the surface-active moieties existing on both CA and ox-LC, while thermodynamic data revealed that the adsorption process was endothermic and entropy-driven. The experimental data obtained from the adsorption experiments were well-fitted by the Langmuir and Freundlich models. Overall, the produced composites exhibited enhanced adsorption efficiency against U(VI), demonstrating their potential use as effective adsorbents for the recovery of uranium ions from industrial effluents and seawater. Full article
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

13 pages, 7298 KiB  
Article
Residual Chlorella-Based Cellulose Nanofibers and Their Quaternization Modification and Efficient Anionic Dye Adsorption
by Lina Zhang, Xiaomin Huo, Jin Zhu, Changbin Liu and Lianfeng Wang
Materials 2023, 16(10), 3642; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma16103642 - 10 May 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1063
Abstract
Dye is an anionic common pollutant in industrial wastewater and poses a great threat to the environment and human health. Owing to its advantageous adsorption capacity, nanocellulose is widely used for wastewater treatment. The cell walls of Chlorella mainly comprise cellulose instead of [...] Read more.
Dye is an anionic common pollutant in industrial wastewater and poses a great threat to the environment and human health. Owing to its advantageous adsorption capacity, nanocellulose is widely used for wastewater treatment. The cell walls of Chlorella mainly comprise cellulose instead of lignin. In this study, residual Chlorella-based cellulose nanofiber (CNF) and cationic cellulose nanofiber (CCNF) with surface quaternization were prepared through homogenization. Moreover, Congo red (CR) was used as a model dye to measure the adsorption capacity of CNF and CCNF. The adsorption capacity was almost saturated when CNF and CCNF contacted CR for 100 min, and the adsorption kinetics coincided with the pseudo-secondary kinetics model. The initial concentration of CR considerably affected its adsorption on CNF and CCNF. Below the initial concentration of 40 mg/g, the adsorption on CNF and CCNF considerably increased with the increase in the initial concentration of CR. Based on the sorption isotherms analysis of CNF and CCNF, the Langmuir model fitted best with the experimental data. Thus, CNF and CCNF surfaces were uniform, and monolayer adsorption occurred. The adsorption of CR on CNF and CCNF was greatly affected by the pH value, and the acidic medium favored the adsorption of CR (especially for CCNF). CCNF showed a more advantageous adsorption capacity, with a maximum value of 1657.89 mg/g, compared to that of CNF (190.0 mg/g). According to the findings of this study, residual Chlorella-based CCNF could be a very promising adsorbent candidate for removing anionic dyes from wastewater. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop