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Corrosion and Corrosion Inhibition of Metals and Their Alloys II

A special issue of Materials (ISSN 1996-1944). This special issue belongs to the section "Corrosion".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (20 March 2024) | Viewed by 3825

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Institute of Material Engineering, University of Silesia in Katowice, Katowice, Poland
Interests: batteries; biomaterials; corrosion and corrosion protection; electrocatalysis; electrochemistry of materials; electrochemical impedance spectroscopy; hydrogen adsorption, absorption, and electroevolution phenomena; mechanism and kinetics of electrode processes; metallic hydrides
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

In the Age of Materials, there are many construction materials available, including metals and their alloys. The selection of the right metallic material and its proper application is an important and responsible task in every branch of technology. There are no general rules that would make it possible to choose the right material for a given application in advance. The right decision should always be based on knowledge of the characteristics of the metals and their alloys; ease of processing; availability; price; and their mechanical, physical, and chemical properties.

The corrosion of metals and their alloys strongly affects many sectors of a nation’s economy. This physicochemical interaction between a metal or alloy and its environment results in changes in the properties of the metal or alloy, which can often lead to impairment of the function of the metal or alloy, the environment, or the technical system of which these form a part. Corrosion is one of the main sources of metallic material loss. It contributes to environmental pollution and poses a threat to human health. Therefore, the goal of corrosion science and engineering with a strong interdisciplinary character is to learn the mechanisms and kinetics of the gradual destruction of metallic materials as a result of the chemical or electrochemical interaction of the corrosive environment and the maximum slowdown of the process of metal and alloy returns to a thermodynamically stable state.

This Special Issue is oriented toward all corrosion issues associated with the fundamentals of the corrosion science of metals and their alloys; corrosion protection; testing to assess corrosion resistance; data collection and analysis; and the use of corrosion data in economic and risk analysis, lifetime prediction, and decision making. Subjects of interest include the corrosion behavior of iron and low-alloy steels, corrosion-resistant steels, copper and its alloys, aluminum and its alloys, titanium and its alloys, nickel and its alloys, zinc and its alloys, and others. The development of methods to prevent and control the corrosion of metals and their alloys is also of interest.

I am pleased to invite you to submit a manuscript for this Special Issue. Full papers, communications, and reviews are all welcome.

Prof. Dr. Bożena Łosiewicz
Guest Editor

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Keywords

  • metals
  • alloys
  • corrosion
  • corrosion inhibition
  • corrosion protection

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Research

16 pages, 4218 KiB  
Article
Study on the Effect of Polyamine Water Treatment Agent on Metal Corrosion Inhibition in Boiler Steam–Water System
by Zhijuan Zhao, Bingqing Cao, Bo Zhao, Sheng Chen and Dong Jin
Materials 2024, 17(5), 1063; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma17051063 - 26 Feb 2024
Viewed by 493
Abstract
A polyamine water treatment agent was prepared with the film-forming amine (N-oleyl-1,3-propylenediamine) and the neutralizing amine (cyclohexanamine) under optimal conditions. The copper sulfate liquid drop experiment showed that a protective film was formed by the polyamine water treatment agent on carbon steel. The [...] Read more.
A polyamine water treatment agent was prepared with the film-forming amine (N-oleyl-1,3-propylenediamine) and the neutralizing amine (cyclohexanamine) under optimal conditions. The copper sulfate liquid drop experiment showed that a protective film was formed by the polyamine water treatment agent on carbon steel. The analyses of the polarization curve and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy of carbon steel indicated that the polyamine water treatment agent exhibited geometric effects, which could inhibit both anode and cathode reactions of carbon steel, and the corrosion inhibition effect of the polyamine water treatment agent showed an extreme-concentration phenomenon. A metal corrosion experiment in a simulated boiler steam–water system indicated that the polyamine water treatment agent mitigated the corrosion of carbon steel at different temperatures, and the corrosion inhibition rates of the polyamine water treatment agent in liquid and gas environments at 150 °C were 53.84% and 67.43%, respectively, better than that at 350 °C. SEM-EDS characterization indicated that the formation of the corrosion product, iron oxide, on the carbon steel was reduced with the addition of the polyamine water treatment agent in the simulated boiler steam–water system. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Corrosion and Corrosion Inhibition of Metals and Their Alloys II)
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21 pages, 5467 KiB  
Article
Changes in Corrosion Behaviour of Zinc and Aluminium Coatings with Increasing Seawater Acidification
by Cezary Senderowski, Wojciech Rejmer, Nataliia Vigilianska and Arkadiusz Jeznach
Materials 2024, 17(3), 536; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma17030536 - 23 Jan 2024
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 696
Abstract
The increase in greenhouse gas emissions has led to seawater acidification, increasing the corrosion rate of metal structures in marine applications. This paper indicates that the spraying of four types of coatings, namely Zn, Al, Zn-Al, and Al-Mg, using the arc-spraying technique on [...] Read more.
The increase in greenhouse gas emissions has led to seawater acidification, increasing the corrosion rate of metal structures in marine applications. This paper indicates that the spraying of four types of coatings, namely Zn, Al, Zn-Al, and Al-Mg, using the arc-spraying technique on steel substrate S235JR, creates effective protective coatings that interact differently with various pH solutions exposed to varying levels of seawater acidification. The study analyses the structural properties of the coating materials using SEM and XRD techniques. Electrochemical parameters are evaluated in solutions with different pH and salinity levels. The results demonstrate that alloy metallic coatings provide excellent resistance to corrosion in low-pH solutions. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Corrosion and Corrosion Inhibition of Metals and Their Alloys II)
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24 pages, 7539 KiB  
Article
Effect of Artificial Saliva Modification on Pitting Corrosion and Mechanical Properties of the Remanium®-Type Orthodontic Archwire
by Bożena Łosiewicz, Patrycja Osak, Karolina Górka-Kulikowska, Tomasz Goryczka, Michał Dworak, Joanna Maszybrocka and Krzysztof Aniołek
Materials 2023, 16(20), 6791; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma16206791 - 20 Oct 2023
Viewed by 836
Abstract
The pitting corrosion of orthodontic apparatus elements in the oral environment is an interest of both clinicians and scientists dealing with the assessment of the biocompatibility of medical materials. This work presents a study on the effect of ready-to-use Listerine® and Meridol [...] Read more.
The pitting corrosion of orthodontic apparatus elements in the oral environment is an interest of both clinicians and scientists dealing with the assessment of the biocompatibility of medical materials. This work presents a study on the effect of ready-to-use Listerine® and Meridol® mouthwashes and sodium fluoride on the resistance of the commercial Remanium®-type orthodontic archwire to pitting corrosion in artificial saliva at 37 °C. XRD, SEM, EDS, mechanical properties, and microhardness measurements were used to characterize the archwire. The in vitro corrosion resistance of the archwire was examined using the open-circuit potential method, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, and anodic polarization curves. The physicochemical characteristics confirmed the presence of a bi-phase alloy with a mixed austenite/ferrite structure containing Fe 74.4(7) at.%, Cr 18.4(4) at.%, and Ni 7.2(4) at.%. The Fe–Cr–Ni alloy was characterized by high tensile strength and Vickers microhardness. EIS revealed the capacitive behavior with high corrosion resistance. It was found that the kinetics of pitting corrosion in the artificial saliva decreased in the presence of NaF and mouthwashes. The potentiodynamic characteristics confirmed the decrease in susceptibility to pitting corrosion after the modification of artificial saliva. The pitting corrosion mechanism of the self-passive oxide layer on the surface of the Fe–Cr–Ni electrode in the biological environment containing chloride ions was discussed in detail. Mechanical properties after corrosion tests were weakened. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Corrosion and Corrosion Inhibition of Metals and Their Alloys II)
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16 pages, 4731 KiB  
Article
Microstructure and Corrosion Behavior of Zinc/Hydroxyapatite Multi-Layer Coating Prepared by Combining Cold Spraying and High-Velocity Suspension Flame Spraying
by Hailong Yao, Xiaozhen Hu, Qingyu Chen, Hongtao Wang and Xiaobo Bai
Materials 2023, 16(20), 6782; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma16206782 - 20 Oct 2023
Viewed by 690
Abstract
The study aims to enhance the corrosion resistance and bioactivity of Mg alloy substrates through the development of a zinc/hydroxyapatite multi-layer (Zn/HA-ML) coating. The Zn/HA-ML coating was prepared by depositing a cold-sprayed (CS) Zn underlayer and a high-velocity suspension flame sprayed (HVSFS) Zn/HA [...] Read more.
The study aims to enhance the corrosion resistance and bioactivity of Mg alloy substrates through the development of a zinc/hydroxyapatite multi-layer (Zn/HA-ML) coating. The Zn/HA-ML coating was prepared by depositing a cold-sprayed (CS) Zn underlayer and a high-velocity suspension flame sprayed (HVSFS) Zn/HA multi-layer and was compared with the CS Zn coating and the Zn/HA dual-layer (Zn/HA-DL) coating. Phase, microstructure, and bonding strength were examined, respectively, by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and tensile bonding testing. Corrosion behavior and bioactivity were investigated using potentiodynamic polarization, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, and immersion testing. Results show that the HVSFS Zn/HA composite layers were mainly composed of Zn, HA, and ZnO and were well bonded to the substrate. The HVSFS HA upper layer on the CS Zn underlayer in the Zn/HA-DL coating exhibited microcracks due to their mismatched thermal expansion coefficient (CTE). The Zn/HA-ML coating exhibited good bonding within different layers and showed a higher bonding strength of 27.3 ± 2.3 MPa than the Zn/HA-DL coating of 20.4 ± 2.7 MPa. The CS Zn coating, Zn/HA-DL coating, and Zn/HA-ML coating decreased the corrosion current density of the Mg alloy substrate by around two–fourfold from 3.12 ± 0.75 mA/cm2 to 1.41 ± 0.82mA/cm2, 1.06 ± 0.31 mA/cm2, and 0.88 ± 0.27 mA/cm2, respectively. The Zn/HA-ML coating showed a sixfold decrease in the corrosion current density and more improvements in the corrosion resistance by twofold after an immersion time of 14 days, which was mainly attributed to newly formed apatite and corrosion by-products of Zn particles. The Zn/HA-ML coating effectively combined the advantages of the corrosion resistance of CS Zn underlayer and the bioactivity of HVSFS Zn/HA multi-layers, which proposed a low-temperature strategy for improving corrosion resistance and bioactivity for implant metals. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Corrosion and Corrosion Inhibition of Metals and Their Alloys II)
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10 pages, 4269 KiB  
Article
Manipulating the Cathodic Modification Effect on Corrosion Resistance of High Corrosion-Resistant Titanium Alloy
by Bosung Seo, Hyung-Ki Park, Chang-Soo Park, Seongtak Kim and Kwangsuk Park
Materials 2023, 16(18), 6217; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma16186217 - 15 Sep 2023
Viewed by 718
Abstract
Further improving the corrosion resistance of the ASTM Grade 13 (Gr13) titanium alloy was achieved by manipulating the cathodic modification effect. The cathodic modification of Gr13 was mainly related to the Ti2Ni precipitate, where minor Ru was contained and controlled the [...] Read more.
Further improving the corrosion resistance of the ASTM Grade 13 (Gr13) titanium alloy was achieved by manipulating the cathodic modification effect. The cathodic modification of Gr13 was mainly related to the Ti2Ni precipitate, where minor Ru was contained and controlled the precipitate in terms of size and distribution, which could manipulate the cathodic modification effect. Parameters such as temperature and cooling rate during the recrystallization process were designed to control precipitation behavior, where the temperature at 850 °C was selected to allow the full dissolution of the Ti2Ni precipitate. The cooling rate, as high as 160.9 °C/min, was still enough for precipitation to occur during the cooling stage, leading to the formation of the Ti2Ni precipitate along with a grain boundary. The cooling rate of water quenching was too fast to cause the diffusion process, resulting in a large amount of the β-Ti phase without the precipitate, which was pre-formed while heated at 850 °C. Aging at 600 °C caused the re-precipitation of Ti2Ni, and, at that moment, the precipitate was refined and separated, as a good aspect of the catalyst for HER. Therefore, the aged sample after water quenching showed the lowest onset potential for HER with the highest corrosion potential, indicating that its passivation ability was improved by the strengthened cathodic modification effect. This improvement was confirmed by the OCP results, where passivation survival was observed for the aged sample due to the highest cathodic modification effect. Therefore, the aged sample, which had refined and separate precipitates, showed the lowest corrosion rate. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Corrosion and Corrosion Inhibition of Metals and Their Alloys II)
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