Advances in Electrochemical Properties of Magnetic Materials

A special issue of Magnetochemistry (ISSN 2312-7481). This special issue belongs to the section "Magnetic Materials".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 May 2024 | Viewed by 2104

Special Issue Editor

Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, University of Houston, Houston, TX 77204, USA
Interests: multi-scale modeling; catalysts; magnetic materials; energy storage materials

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The electrochemical properties of magnetic materials refer to their behavior in response to electrical stimuli, including their ability to store and transfer charge, their reactivity in electrochemical reactions, and their magnetic properties. This Special Issue focuses on recent advances in the understanding and characterization of these properties, as well as their potential applications in various fields, such as energy storage, catalysis, and biomedical technologies.

The specific aims of the Special Issue include but are not limited to:

  1. Highlighting recent advances in the synthesis and characterization of magnetic materials with improved electrochemical properties.
  2. Discussing the fundamental principles and mechanisms underlying the electrochemical properties of magnetic materials, such as their charge storage and transfer capabilities.
  3. Exploring the potential applications of magnetic materials in electrochemical devices, such as batteries, supercapacitors, and sensors.
  4. Examining the role of magnetic materials in catalytic reactions and exploring their potential for use as catalysts.
  5. Reviewing the latest developments in the use of magnetic materials in biomedical technologies, such as drug delivery and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI).

Dr. Hong Zhong
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Magnetochemistry is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2700 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • 2D and 3D magnetic materials
  • magnetic properties
  • theoretical models and calculations
  • electro-chemistry
  • electrode materials
  • electrocatalysis
  • magnetic sensors

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

13 pages, 4474 KiB  
Article
Effect of Electrode–Normal Magnetic Field on the Motion of Hydrogen Bubbles
by Yen-Ju Chen, Yan-Hom Li and Ching-Yao Chen
Magnetochemistry 2023, 9(12), 233; https://doi.org/10.3390/magnetochemistry9120233 - 18 Dec 2023
Viewed by 1524
Abstract
In comparison to alternative methods for hydrogen production, water electrolysis stands out as the optimal means for obtaining ultra-pure hydrogen. However, its widespread adoption is significantly hampered by its low energy efficiency. It has been established that the introduction of an external magnetic [...] Read more.
In comparison to alternative methods for hydrogen production, water electrolysis stands out as the optimal means for obtaining ultra-pure hydrogen. However, its widespread adoption is significantly hampered by its low energy efficiency. It has been established that the introduction of an external magnetic field can mitigate energy consumption, consequently enhancing electrolysis efficiency. While much of the research has revealed that an electrode–parallel magnetic field plays a crucial role in enhancing the bubble detachment process, there has been limited exploration of the effect of electrode–normal magnetic fields. In this work, we compare the water electrolysis efficiency of a circular electrode subjected to electrode–normal magnetic field resulting in a magnet edge effect and electrode edge effect by varying the sizes of the magnet and electrode. The findings indicate that a rotational flow caused by the Lorentz force facilitates the detachment of the hydrogen from the electrode surface. However, the rotation direction of hydrogen gas bubbles generated by the magnet edge effect is opposite to that of electrode edge effect. Furthermore, the magnet edge effect has more significant influence on the hydrogen bubbles’ locomotion than the electrode edge effect. With an electrode gap of 30 mm, employing the magnet edge effect generated by a single magnet leads to an average of 4.9% increase in current density. On the other hand, the multiple magnet effects created by multiple small magnets under the electrode can further result in an average 6.6% increase in current density. Nevertheless, at an electrode spacing of 50 mm, neither the magnet edge effect nor the electrode edge effect demonstrates a notable enhancement in conductivity. In reality, the electrode edge effect even leads to a reduction in conductivity. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Electrochemical Properties of Magnetic Materials)
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