Land Use Planning, Sustainability and Disaster Risk Reduction

A special issue of Land (ISSN 2073-445X). This special issue belongs to the section "Land Planning and Landscape Architecture".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 23 May 2024 | Viewed by 5218

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
1. Centre of Geographical Studies, Institute of Geography and Spatial Planning, University of Lisbon, 1600-276 Lisbon, Portugal
2. Associated Laboratory TERRA, 1349-017 Lisbon, Portugal
Interests: natural hazards; flooding; wildfires; insurance; risk assessment; spatial analysis; geographical information systems

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
1. Institute of Social Sciences, University of Lisbon, 1600-189 Lisbon, Portugal
2. Centre of Geographical Studies, Institute of Geography and Spatial Planning, University of Lisbon, 1600-276 Lisbon, Portugal
3. Associated Laboratory TERRA, 1349-017 Lisbon, Portugal
Interests: economic and social geography; regional development; sustainable development; spatial planning; geopolitics and political geography; statistical modeling

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
1. Centre of Geographical Studies, Institute of Geography and Spatial Planning, Universidade de Lisboa, Edifício IGOT, Rua Branca Edmée Marques, 1600-276 Lisbon, Portugal
2. Associated Laboratory TERRA, Instituto Superior de Agronomia, Universidade de Lisboa, 1349-017 Lisboa, Portugal
Interests: natural hazards; slope instability; data-driven and deterministic modeling; risk assessment; spatial planning

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
1. Centre of Geographical Studies, Institute of Geography and Spatial Planning, University of Lisbon, 1600-276 Lisbon, Portugal
2. Associated Laboratory TERRA, 1349-017 Lisbon, Portugal
Interests: slope instability; early warning systems; natural hazards; vulnerability and risk assessment; applied geomorphology and spatial planning; coastal erosion
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

According to the United Nations Office for Disaster Risk Reduction, disaster risk reduction (DRR) strategies should prevent new and reduce existing risks, thus ensuring effective risk management. The Sendai framework, in line with the other 2030 Agenda-related agreements (e.g., the Paris Agreement on Climate Change and the New Urban Agenda), defines four priorities: 1) understanding disaster risk; 2) strengthening disaster risk governance to manage disaster risk; 3) investing in disaster risk reduction for resilience; and 4) enhancing disaster preparedness for effective response and to “build back better” in recovery, rehabilitation and reconstruction.

In this sense, land use planning can play a decisive role. Well-designed and -implemented spatial planning promotes more resilient and sustainable landscapes and communities. This can be achieved by: 1) identifying hazard-prone areas, exposed populations and highly vulnerable groups, as well as exposed structures and infrastructures; 2) encouraging sustainable practices, including in the socio-economic sphere; 3) creating early warning systems and evacuation plans; 4) increasing risk awareness and preparedness; 5) stablishing effective coordination between national/regional/local governments and stakeholders; and 6) promoting public participation and the involvement of populations in decision making.

The frequency, extent and magnitude of extreme events (e.g., flooding, droughts, wildfires) are expected to increase as a result of climate change, threatening more vulnerable and less resilient societies and populations. In this context, the European Commission recently defined five common goals to enhance disaster resilience: anticipate, prepare, alert, respond and secure. Therefore, governments, civil society and individuals should promote and implement mitigation and adaptation actions to decrease hazards, exposure and vulnerability, increasing resilience and reducing damage.

The main goal of this Special Issue is to strengthen and deepen the knowledge on the interconnections and relationships between land use planning, disaster risk reduction, ecological and socio-economic resilience, and climate change. Studies in all scientific areas and subjects related to these main topics are welcome in this Special Issue, in line with the interdisciplinarity of the Land journal.

The studies included in this Special Issue (original research articles and review papers) are expected to address the following themes:

  • Assessment of hazard, exposure, vulnerability and risk to a given or combined natural hazards from environmental, social and/or economic perspectives;
  • Effects and contributions of national/regional/local land use planning and risk management to decrease the frequency, magnitude and damage of natural hazards;
  • Methods to improve the resilience of urban or rural exposed populations;
  • Natural risk management links to environmental and social sustainability;
  • Consequences and threats of climate change (e.g., extreme events, health problems, poverty, displacements), and mitigation and adaptation actions.

We look forward to receiving your original research articles and reviews.

Dr. Miguel Leal
Dr. Paulo Miguel Madeira
Dr. Raquel de Melo
Dr. Sérgio Cruz de Oliveira
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Land is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • land use planning
  • disaster risk reduction (DRR)
  • natural hazards
  • sustainability
  • climate change
  • resilience
  • risk assessment
  • risk management

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

30 pages, 13456 KiB  
Article
Distribution Characteristics and Influencing Factors of the National Comprehensive Disaster-Reduction Demonstration Community in China
by Haoran Su, Chang Liu, Donghui Dai, Wenkai Chen, Zhen Zhang and Yaowu Wang
Land 2023, 12(8), 1633; https://doi.org/10.3390/land12081633 - 20 Aug 2023
Viewed by 1116
Abstract
Establishing the National Comprehensive Disaster-Reduction Demonstration Community (NCDDC) is crucial for enhancing comprehensive disaster risk reduction at the grassroots level in China. Studying the distribution characteristics and influencing factors of NCDDCs can guide future NCDDC layout optimization and related policy adjustments. Using the [...] Read more.
Establishing the National Comprehensive Disaster-Reduction Demonstration Community (NCDDC) is crucial for enhancing comprehensive disaster risk reduction at the grassroots level in China. Studying the distribution characteristics and influencing factors of NCDDCs can guide future NCDDC layout optimization and related policy adjustments. Using the standard deviation ellipse, nearest neighbor index, kernel density, spatial autocorrelation, and Geodetector, we analyzed the spatiotemporal distribution characteristics of NCDDCs in China from 2008 to 2021 and detected their influencing factors. The findings are as follows: (1) NCDDCs exhibit an uneven distribution at different scales, including spatial, urban–rural, and county scales. (2) The spatial distribution of NCDDCs mainly follows a northwest–southeast pattern during 2008–2014 and shows a northeast–southwest trend after 2014. (3) The positive spatial correlation and spatial agglomeration of NCDDCs increase annually. (4) NCDDCs show a concentrated and contiguous distribution pattern in 2021, based on “core density zone–ring-core decreasing area–ring-core expansion group–Ɔ-shaped area–belt-shaped area”. (5) The main factors affecting the NCDDC distribution are hospital density, road density, GDP density, and population density, with factors’ interactions exhibiting bilinear and nonlinear enhancement effects. This study reveals the NCDDC spatiotemporal distribution characteristics and its influence mechanism, providing a scientific basis for future NCDDC layout optimization and related policy adjustments. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Land Use Planning, Sustainability and Disaster Risk Reduction)
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22 pages, 7573 KiB  
Article
Risk Assessment and Prevention Planning for Collapse Geological Hazards Considering Extreme Rainfall—A Case Study of Laoshan District in Eastern China
by Peng Yu, Jie Dong, Hongwei Hao, Yongjian Xie, Hui Zhang, Jianshou Wang, Chenghao Zhu, Yong Guan and Haochen Yu
Land 2023, 12(8), 1558; https://doi.org/10.3390/land12081558 - 06 Aug 2023
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 1273
Abstract
Geological disasters refer to adverse geological phenomena that occur under the influence of natural or human factors and cause damage to human life and property. Establishing prevention and control zones based on geological disaster risk assessment results in land planning and management is [...] Read more.
Geological disasters refer to adverse geological phenomena that occur under the influence of natural or human factors and cause damage to human life and property. Establishing prevention and control zones based on geological disaster risk assessment results in land planning and management is crucial for ensuring safe regional development. In recent years, there has been an increase in extreme rainfall events, so it is necessary to conduct effective geological hazard and risk assessments for different extreme rainfall conditions. Based on the first national geological disaster risk survey results, this paper uses the analytic hierarchy process (AHP) combined with the information method (IM) to construct four extreme rainfall conditions, namely, 10-year, 20-year, 50-year, and 100-year return periods. The susceptibility, hazard, vulnerability, and risk of geological disasters in the Laoshan District in eastern China are evaluated, and prevention and control zones are established based on the evaluation results. The results show that: (1) There are 121 collapse geological disasters in Laoshan District, generally at a low susceptibility level. (2) A positive correlation exists between extreme rainfall and hazards/risks. With the rainfall condition changing from a 10-year return period to a 100-year return period, the proportion of high-hazard zones increased from 20% to 41%, and high-risk zones increased from 31% to 51%, respectively. The Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) proved that the assessment accuracy was acceptable. (3) Key, sub-key, and general prevention zones have been established, and corresponding prevention and control suggestions have been proposed, providing a reference for geological disaster prevention and early warning in other regions. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Land Use Planning, Sustainability and Disaster Risk Reduction)
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18 pages, 7000 KiB  
Article
Research on the Impact of Heavy Rainfall Flooding on Urban Traffic Network Based on Road Topology: A Case Study of Xi’an City, China
by Jiayu Liu, Xiangyu Yang and Shaobin Ren
Land 2023, 12(7), 1355; https://doi.org/10.3390/land12071355 - 06 Jul 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1709
Abstract
In recent years, the frequent occurrence of extreme emergencies represented by heavy rainfall has posed a significant impact on urban transportation networks and caused great inconvenience to people’s production and life. This paper examines the impact of heavy rainfall on the urban transportation [...] Read more.
In recent years, the frequent occurrence of extreme emergencies represented by heavy rainfall has posed a significant impact on urban transportation networks and caused great inconvenience to people’s production and life. This paper examines the impact of heavy rainfall on the urban transportation network in Xi’an’s main urban area, models the map of urban road network in the main urban area of Xi’an by applying complex network theory, quantifies and analyzes the topological and geographic structural characteristics of the affected sections (interrupted by heavy rainfall) due to heavy rainfall, as well as the impact of heavy rainfall on the functional indexes of the road network such as access efficiency and accessibility, and, finally, analyzes its formation causes and proposes targeted management countermeasures. The findings of this study serve as a valuable reference for enhancing urban traffic emergency management capabilities and fostering sustainable urban development. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Land Use Planning, Sustainability and Disaster Risk Reduction)
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