Advances in Hydro-Sedimentological Modeling for Simulating LULC

A special issue of Land (ISSN 2073-445X). This special issue belongs to the section "Soil-Sediment-Water Systems".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 July 2024 | Viewed by 3407

Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
Water Resources Department, Engineering School, Federal University of Lavras, Lavras 37200-000, MG, Brazil
Interests: hydrological modeling; water resources management; environmental science; soil physics; hydrology; environmental impact assessment; water balance; climate change impacts on hydrology
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Land Use/Land Cover impacts on the hydrology and sediment transport in catchments have challenged modelers and environmental scientists worldwide. There are many problems in simulating the LULC impacts on the surface hydrological processes. One of these problems is improving the soil-plant-root relationships to capture the fundamental changes in the surface runoff and sediment transport processes. Relations between plants’ roots and biota with the soil surface layer are relevant as the preferential flows are formed in the soil profile, increasing the soil infiltration capacity, reducing the surface runoff, and increasing groundwater recharge. The relationship between plants’ canopy and rainfall partitioning is also a key factor for surface runoff generation. Most hydrological and sedimentological models need to adequately cope with the abovementioned relations, which generate a calibration process that can not represent the soil-water-atmosphere processes, resulting in poor or biased surface runoff simulation. 

We can tackle these problems by improving our understanding of the soil’s physical infiltration processes and using alternatives such as Artificial Intelligence that allows training the machine models to capture the influence of preferential flows and organic matter on the infiltration and, consequently, in surface runoff.

The purpose of this SI is to invite scientists from several areas of knowledge to contribute with their expertise in surface runoff and sediment transport modeling, considering the recent advancements in this challenging subject that are very important for the management of the land, considering the surface hydrological processes. Studies related to preferential flows in forested areas, novelties in rainfall canopy partitioning, machine learning useful in simulating surface runoff and sediment transport using robust datasets, and the incorporation of new techniques for physical-based model calibration aiming to simulate LULC scenarios are welcome.

Dr. Carlos Rogério Mello
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Land is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • land use/cover change
  • hydrological modeling
  • sediment transport
  • machine learning
  • environmental science
  • climate change
  • soil physics

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

17 pages, 6208 KiB  
Article
Evaluation of Soil Hydraulic Properties in Northern and Central Tunisian Soils for Improvement of Hydrological Modelling
by Asma Hmaied, Pascal Podwojewski, Ines Gharnouki, Hanene Chaabane and Claude Hammecker
Land 2024, 13(3), 385; https://doi.org/10.3390/land13030385 - 18 Mar 2024
Viewed by 961
Abstract
The hydrological cycle is strongly affected by climate changes causing extreme weather events with long drought periods and heavy rainfall events. To predict the hydrological functioning of Tunisian catchments, modelling is an essential tool to estimate the consequences on water resources and to [...] Read more.
The hydrological cycle is strongly affected by climate changes causing extreme weather events with long drought periods and heavy rainfall events. To predict the hydrological functioning of Tunisian catchments, modelling is an essential tool to estimate the consequences on water resources and to test the sustainability of the different land uses. Soil physical properties describing water flow are essential to feed the models and must therefore be determined all over the watershed. A simple but robust ring infiltration method combined with particle size distribution (PSD) analysis (BEST method) was used to evaluate and derive the retention properties and the hydraulic conductivities. Physically based and statistical pedotransfer functions based on PSD were compared to test their potential use for different types of Tunisian soils. The functional sensitivity of these parameters was assessed by employing the Hydrus-1D software (PC Progress, Prague, Czech Republic) for water balance computations. This evaluation process involved testing the responsiveness and accuracy of the parameters in simulating various water balance components within the model. The evaluation of soil hydraulic parameters across the three used models highlighted significant variations, demonstrating distinct characteristics in each model. While notable differences were evident overall, intriguing similarities emerged, particularly regarding saturated hydraulic conductivity between BEST and Rosetta, and the shape parameter (n) between Arya–Paris and Rosetta. These parallels indicate shared hydraulic properties among the models, underscoring areas of agreement amid their diverse results. Significant differences were shown for scale parameter α for the various methods employed. Marginal differences in evaporation and drainage were observed between the BEST and Arya–Paris methods, with Rosetta distinctly highlighting a disparity between physically based models and statistical models. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Hydro-Sedimentological Modeling for Simulating LULC)
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14 pages, 812 KiB  
Article
Modeling Landscape Influence on Stream Baseflows for Watershed Conservation
by Timothy O. Randhir and Kimberly B. Klosterman
Land 2024, 13(3), 324; https://doi.org/10.3390/land13030324 - 3 Mar 2024
Viewed by 1024
Abstract
Instream flows are vital to the ecology of riverine and riparian systems. The influence of watershed characteristics on these systems is helpful in developing landscape policies to maintain these flows. Watershed characteristics like precipitation, forest cover, impervious cover, soil drainage, and slope affect [...] Read more.
Instream flows are vital to the ecology of riverine and riparian systems. The influence of watershed characteristics on these systems is helpful in developing landscape policies to maintain these flows. Watershed characteristics like precipitation, forest cover, impervious cover, soil drainage, and slope affect baseflows. Spatial analysis using GIS and nonlinear regression analysis is used to analyze spatial and temporal information from gauged watersheds in Massachusetts to quantify the relationship between baseflows and watershed metrics. The marginal functions of landscape factors that reflect changes in baseflow are quantified. This information is then applied to watershed policy toward improving base flows. The interactions of three fixed attributes, soil drainage, rainfall incidence, and slope, are analyzed for the manageable landscape attributes of impervious and forest cover. Developing watershed policy to protect baseflows involves evaluating the complex interactions and functional relationships between these landscape factors and their use in watershed conservation planning. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Hydro-Sedimentological Modeling for Simulating LULC)
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20 pages, 10433 KiB  
Article
A Modeling Approach for Analyzing the Hydrological Impacts of the Agribusiness Land-Use Scenarios in an Amazon Basin
by Zandra A. Cunha, Carlos R. Mello, Samuel Beskow, Marcelle M. Vargas, Jorge A. Guzman and Maíra M. Moura
Land 2023, 12(7), 1422; https://doi.org/10.3390/land12071422 - 16 Jul 2023
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 936
Abstract
The Xingu River Basin (XRB) in the Brazilian Amazon region has a great relevance to the development of northern Brazil because of the Belo Monte hydropower plant and its crescent agribusiness expansion. This study aimed to evaluate the potential of the Lavras Simulation [...] Read more.
The Xingu River Basin (XRB) in the Brazilian Amazon region has a great relevance to the development of northern Brazil because of the Belo Monte hydropower plant and its crescent agribusiness expansion. This study aimed to evaluate the potential of the Lavras Simulation of the Hydrology (LASH) model to represent the main hydrological processes in the XRB and simulate the hydrological impacts in the face of land-use change scenarios. Following the trend of the most relevant agribusiness evolution in the XRB, four agribusiness scenarios (S) were structured considering the increase in grasslands (S1: 50% over the native forest; S2: 100% over the native forest) and soybean plantations (S3: 50% over the native forest; S4: 100% over native forest). Average hydrographs were simulated, and the frequency duration curves (FDC) and average annual values of the main hydrological components for each scenario were compared. The results showed that, in general, changes in land use based on deforestation in the XRB would lead to an increase in flood streamflow and a reduction in baseflow. The increases in direct surface runoff varied from 4.4% for S1 to 29.8% for S4 scenarios. The reduction in baseflow varied from −1.6% for S1 to −4.9% for S2. These changes were reduced when the entire XRB was analyzed, but notable for the sub-basins in its headwater region, where the scenarios were more effective. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Hydro-Sedimentological Modeling for Simulating LULC)
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