Feature Papers for Land Planning and Landscape Architecture Section

A special issue of Land (ISSN 2073-445X). This special issue belongs to the section "Land Planning and Landscape Architecture".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 April 2024 | Viewed by 1666

Special Issue Editor

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Landscape is an important part of the quality of life of people in urban and rural contexts. Taking into consideration the fact that sustainable development is based on a harmonious relationship between social needs, economic activity, and the environment, the landscape constitutes a resource favorable to economic activity and whose protection, management, and planning can contribute to job creation. Acknowledging that the quality and diversity of landscapes constitute a common resource and a basic component of the natural and cultural heritage that contribute to human well-being, it is important to develop research towards their protection, management, and planning.

In this Special Issue, we invite papers focusing on, but not limited to, the following topics:

  • Landscape protection/management/restoration;
  • Multi-scale planning and design;
  • Landscape as infrastructure;
  • Land planning and landscape architecture as they pertain to the following:
    • Smart cities;
    • Ecosystem services;
    • Human health and well-being;
    • Biodiversity;
    • Education;
    • GIS, remote sensing, big data, AI, VR, BIM, the IoT, and other advanced technologies;
    • Social/spatial/environmental/distributional/procedural justice;
    • Transport;
    • Heritage;
    • Real estate;
    • Energy transition.

We look forward to receiving your submissions.

Prof. Dr. Thomas Panagopoulos
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Land is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • land planning
  • landscape management
  • landscape protection
  • landscape architecture
  • landscape urbanism
  • environmental design
  • landscape perception

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

27 pages, 4976 KiB  
Article
Roadside Vegetation Functions, Woody Plant Values, and Ecosystem Services in Rural Streetscapes: A Qualitative Study on Rural Settlements in Western Slovakia
by Gabriel Kuczman, Denis Bechera, Zdenka Rózová and Attila Tóth
Land 2024, 13(3), 272; https://doi.org/10.3390/land13030272 - 21 Feb 2024
Viewed by 566
Abstract
Woody plants in roadside green spaces of rural settlements provide a wide range of ecosystem functions and services. The study presented in this paper was conducted in three rural settlements in Western Slovakia, representing three different rural landscape types—lowland, basin, and mountainous landscapes. [...] Read more.
Woody plants in roadside green spaces of rural settlements provide a wide range of ecosystem functions and services. The study presented in this paper was conducted in three rural settlements in Western Slovakia, representing three different rural landscape types—lowland, basin, and mountainous landscapes. The assessed woody vegetation is situated in diverse settlement structures, with various spatial patterns. A comprehensive woody plant assessment was conducted in selected central streetscapes of three model settlements, examining spatial, compositional, visual, aesthetic, and other values, as well as the characteristics of woody plants. These attributes were clustered according to five main functions and fourteen value parameters and the results were assigned to three quality categories, to objectivise a qualitative woody plant assessment in roadside vegetation structures in the countryside. The findings show the level of suitability of woody plants based on how they fulfil aesthetic, compositional, climate, safety, cultural, and historical functions. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Feature Papers for Land Planning and Landscape Architecture Section)
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29 pages, 9853 KiB  
Article
Regional Policies, Practices, Tools, and Strategies to Implement Polycentric Development: Comparative Case Studies of Portland, Seattle, and Denver
by Reid Ewing, Torrey Lyons, Seyed Hassan Ameli, John Hersey and Justyna Kaniewska
Land 2024, 13(2), 238; https://doi.org/10.3390/land13020238 - 15 Feb 2024
Viewed by 769
Abstract
Many of the larger US metropolitan regions promote polycentric development as a way of fostering livability, accessibility, and sustainability. Polycentric urban structures can increase transit ridership, promote active transportation, and decrease vehicle miles traveled (VMT) and CO2 emissions. Although many regions include [...] Read more.
Many of the larger US metropolitan regions promote polycentric development as a way of fostering livability, accessibility, and sustainability. Polycentric urban structures can increase transit ridership, promote active transportation, and decrease vehicle miles traveled (VMT) and CO2 emissions. Although many regions include ambitious polycentric aspirations in their plans, only a few follow up with rigorous implementation and see their efforts come to fruition. The topic of implementation is also widely omitted from scholarly inquiry. This research aims to explore three examples of successful implementation of urban polycentricity: Portland, Oregon; Seattle, Washington; and Denver, Colorado. Each region employs a very distinct polycentric development model, but each relies heavily on its regional governance organization for direction, guidance, and even command in the implementation process. To understand specific strategies and methods used by each region, the authors conducted interviews with metropolitan planning organizations, central cities, and transit agencies in the three regions and used qualitative techniques to analyze the interview transcripts and collected documents. As regional governance organizations play a crucial role in implementing regional plans, their policies and practices were also investigated by the authors. Based on collected data and insights, we conclude that the three regions are great examples of an advanced implementation of polycentric development. This research can be helpful to other US metropolitan regions that wish to promote polycentric development. The lessons learned from the three case studies can provide guidance and possible paths to successful implementation. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Feature Papers for Land Planning and Landscape Architecture Section)
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