Recent Advances in Coastal Sediment Dynamics and Transport

A special issue of Journal of Marine Science and Engineering (ISSN 2077-1312). This special issue belongs to the section "Physical Oceanography".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 December 2021) | Viewed by 9236

Special Issue Editors

Department of Geosciences and Natural Resource Management, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark
Interests: physical geography; coastal geomorphology; coastal processes; sedimentology; sediment transport; hydrodynamics; sediments; coastal engineering; nearshore oceanography; beach morphodynamics
Department of Physical Geography, Faculty of Geosciences, Utrecht University, P.O. Box 80.115, 3508 TC Utrecht, The Netherlands
Interests: nearshore waves; currents; coastal geomorphology; nourishments; aeolian processes; remote sensing; climate-change impacts
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Transport of sediment is driving morphological change in coastal and marine environments, including coastal profile change, shoreline erosion, harbor siltation and/or scour phenomena, and formation of coastal barriers and spits. Within the past few years, significant progress has been made on topics relating to dynamics and transport of marine and coastal sediments, for example, boundary layer processes, turbulence effects on sediment mobilization, and sheet flow dynamics. At the same time, significant advances have been made with respect to both field and laboratory measurement and numerical modeling of sediment dynamics/transport. However, problems remain with upscaling the improved knowledge on small-scale hydrodynamic and sediment transport processes to further our understanding of coastal behavior and evolution on larger scales, and in the application to coastal engineering problems. In this Special Issue, therefore, we invite original scientific contributions on topics including those covered in the list of keywords.

Prof. Dr. Troels Aagaard
Prof. Dr. Gerben Ruessink
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • Bottom boundary layer dynamics
  • Bed- and surface-generated turbulence
  • Sediment transport
  • Sheet flow dynamics
  • Measurement of sediment dynamics
  • Numerical modeling of sediment mobilization and transport
  • Sediment transport and morphological change
  • Longshore sediment transport
  • Upscaling of sediment transport processes
  • Sediment budgets

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

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26 pages, 3913 KiB  
Article
A Numerical Study of Sheet Flow Driven by Skewed-Asymmetric Shoaling Waves Using SedWaveFoam
J. Mar. Sci. Eng. 2021, 9(9), 936; https://doi.org/10.3390/jmse9090936 - 28 Aug 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 2128
Abstract
SedWaveFoam, an OpenFOAM-based two-phase model that concurrently resolves the free surface wave field, and the bottom boundary layer is used to investigate sediment transport throughout the entire water column. The numerical model was validated with large-scale wave flume data for sheet flow driven [...] Read more.
SedWaveFoam, an OpenFOAM-based two-phase model that concurrently resolves the free surface wave field, and the bottom boundary layer is used to investigate sediment transport throughout the entire water column. The numerical model was validated with large-scale wave flume data for sheet flow driven by shoaling skewed-asymmetric waves with two different grain sizes. Newly obtained model results were combined with previous nonbreaking and near-breaking wave cases to develop parameterization methods for time-dependent bed shear stress and sediment transport rate under various sediment sizes and wave conditions. Gonzalez-Rodriguez and Madsen (GRM07) and quasi-steady approaches were compared for intra-wave bed shear stress. The results show that in strongly asymmetric flows, considering the separated boundary layer development processes at each half wave-cycle (i.e., GRM07) is essential to accurately estimating bed shear stress and highlights the impact of phase-lag effects on sediment transport rates. The quasi-steady approach underpredicts (∼60%) sediment transport rates, especially for fine grains under large velocity asymmetry. A modified phase-lag parameter, incorporating velocity asymmetry, sediment stirring, and settling processes is proposed to extend the Meyer-Peter and Mueller type power law formula. The extended formula accurately estimated the enhanced net onshore sediment transport rate observed under skewed-asymmetric wave conditions. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recent Advances in Coastal Sediment Dynamics and Transport)
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23 pages, 6492 KiB  
Article
Small-Scale Morpho-Sedimentary Dynamics in the Swash Zone of a Megatidal Mixed Sand–Gravel Beach
J. Mar. Sci. Eng. 2021, 9(4), 413; https://doi.org/10.3390/jmse9040413 - 13 Apr 2021
Cited by 6 | Viewed by 1726
Abstract
On mixed sand–gravel beaches, impacts from gravel- and cobble-sized grains—mobilized by the energetic shorebreak—limit the utility of in situ instrumentation for measuring the small-scale response of the beach face on wave period time scales. We present field observations of swash zone morpho-sedimentary dynamics [...] Read more.
On mixed sand–gravel beaches, impacts from gravel- and cobble-sized grains—mobilized by the energetic shorebreak—limit the utility of in situ instrumentation for measuring the small-scale response of the beach face on wave period time scales. We present field observations of swash zone morpho-sedimentary dynamics at a steep, megatidal mixed sand–gravel beach using aeroacoustic and optical remote sensing. Coincident observations of bed level and mean surficial sediment grain size in the swash zone were obtained using an array of optical cameras paired with acoustic range sensors. Lagrangian tracking of swash-transported cobbles was carried out using an additional downward-oriented camera. The principal objective of the study was to investigate linkages between sediment grain size dynamics and swash zone morphological change. In general, data from the range sensor and camera array show that increases in bed level corresponded to increases in mean grain size. Finer-scale structures in the bed level and mean grain size signals were observable over timescales of minutes, including signatures of bands of coarse-grained material that migrated shoreward with the leading edge of the swash prior to high tide berm formation. The direction and magnitude of cobble transport in the swash varied with cross-shore position, and with the composition of the underlying bed. These results demonstrate that close-range remote sensing techniques can provide valuable insights into the roles of cobble-sized versus sand-sized particle dynamics in the swash zone on mixed sand–gravel beaches. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recent Advances in Coastal Sediment Dynamics and Transport)
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16 pages, 5044 KiB  
Article
A Coupled Hydrodynamic-Equilibrium Type Beach Profile Evolution Model
J. Mar. Sci. Eng. 2021, 9(4), 353; https://doi.org/10.3390/jmse9040353 - 24 Mar 2021
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 1827
Abstract
An equilibrium beach profile model is developed and coupled with a parametric hydrodynamic model to provide feedback between the evolving morphology and the hydrodynamics. The model is compared to laboratory beach profiles evolving toward equilibrium conditions under constant forcing. The equilibrium model follows [...] Read more.
An equilibrium beach profile model is developed and coupled with a parametric hydrodynamic model to provide feedback between the evolving morphology and the hydrodynamics. The model is compared to laboratory beach profiles evolving toward equilibrium conditions under constant forcing. The equilibrium model follows the classical approach but uses the bulk sediment transport as the governing model parameter. This approach is coupled with empirically derived and normalised sediment transport functions and a parametric surf zone wave transformation model. The dissipation predicted by the surf zone model controls the cross-shore position of the maxima in the sediment transport functions and hence the cross-shore evolution of the beach profile. Realistic beach profile shapes are generated for both erosive (barred) and accretive (bermed) beach profiles, and predictions of bar and berm position are satisfactory. With more complex normalised sediment transport functions, the model can be applied to conditions with a cyclical wave climate. However, the model concept is better associated with erosive wave conditions and further work is required to improve the link between the modelled dissipation and local transport for accretive conditions. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recent Advances in Coastal Sediment Dynamics and Transport)
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Review

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27 pages, 5335 KiB  
Review
Surf Zone Turbulence and Suspended Sediment Dynamics—A Review
J. Mar. Sci. Eng. 2021, 9(11), 1300; https://doi.org/10.3390/jmse9111300 - 20 Nov 2021
Cited by 6 | Viewed by 2543
Abstract
The existence of sandy beaches relies on the onshore transport of sand by waves during post-storm conditions. Most operational sediment transport models employ wave-averaged terms, and/or the instantaneous cross-shore velocity signal, but the models often fail in predictions of the onshore-directed transport rates. [...] Read more.
The existence of sandy beaches relies on the onshore transport of sand by waves during post-storm conditions. Most operational sediment transport models employ wave-averaged terms, and/or the instantaneous cross-shore velocity signal, but the models often fail in predictions of the onshore-directed transport rates. An important reason is that they rarely consider the phase relationships between wave orbital velocity and the suspended sediment concentration. This relationship depends on the intra-wave structure of the bed shear stress and hence on the timing and magnitude of turbulence production in the water column. This paper provides an up-to-date review of recent experimental advances on intra-wave turbulence characteristics, sediment mobilization, and suspended sediment transport in laboratory and natural surf zones. Experimental results generally show that peaks in the suspended sediment concentration are shifted forward on the wave phase with increasing turbulence levels and instantaneous near-bed sediment concentration scales with instantaneous turbulent kinetic energy. The magnitude and intra-wave phase of turbulence production and sediment concentration are shown to depend on wave (breaker) type, seabed configuration, and relative wave height, which opens up the possibility of more robust predictions of transport rates for different wave and beach conditions. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recent Advances in Coastal Sediment Dynamics and Transport)
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