Metal Pollution and Marine Organisms

A special issue of Journal of Marine Science and Engineering (ISSN 2077-1312). This special issue belongs to the section "Marine Ecology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (10 October 2023) | Viewed by 2981

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
CESAM – Centre for Environmental and Marine Studies, Department of Biology, University of Aveiro, 3810-193 Aveiro, Portugal
Interests: aquatic ecology and ecotoxicology; mercury bioaccumulation; risk assessment; food webs; marine invasive species; climate changes; multiple stressors (natural and anthropogenic), predation risk

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Guest Editor
CESAM–Centre for Environmental and Marine Studies, Department of Biology, University of Aveiro, 3810-193 Aveiro, Portugal
Interests: aquatic ecology and ecotoxicology; community ecotoxicology; evolutionary ecotoxicology; aquatic macroinvertebrates; multiple stressors (natural and anthropogenic); predation risk; parasitism; invasive species
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Special Issue Information

Dear colleagues,

Marine ecosystems are under serious threat due to ongoing pollution. In particular, metal contamination is a global concern that has attracted critical attention. Trace metals (e.g., cadmium (Cd), copper (Cu), mercury (Hg), lead (Pb), etc.) occur naturally in the environment mainly through rock erosion and weathering; however, the ever-increasing human settlement in coastal areas and associated urbanization and intensification of anthropogenic activities (e.g., exploitation of natural resources, agricultural practices, industrial wastes, etc.) has increased their concentration in the marine environment in such a way that may bioaccumulate and pose toxicity to the living organisms. Moreover, they can be widely disseminated through atmospheric and oceanic currents.

These metals represent a serious concern due to their toxicity, persistence and their capacity to bioaccumulate in the marine biota as well as to biomagnify through the trophic chains, posing ecological and health risks. This may impact not only individuals but also populations, communities, species interactions and ecosystem functioning.

Thus, studies aiming to evaluate the occurrence and distribution of metal pollution in the marine environment and associated impact are essential in order to improve relevant biological understanding and better protect marine organisms and ecosystems, especially in the coastal areas.

This Species Issue invites the submission of relevant frontline articles and review papers to share recent discoveries into the causes, impacts and solutions for metal pollution in the marine environment. We are particularly eager to publish findings specifically on risk assessment, (bio)monitoring, toxicity and bioaccumulation studies in marine organisms from the different trophic levels as well as remediation processes (conventional vs. biological treatments).

Contributions to establishing background concentrations and spatial distribution of metal pollution in sediment and water compartments are also welcome, as are novel methodologies to use in risk assessment and (bio)monitoring.

Dr. Hugo C. Vieira
Dr. Maria Bordalo e Sá
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Journal of Marine Science and Engineering is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • pollution
  • marine biota
  • water and sediment compartments
  • risk assessment
  • biomonitoring
  • ecotoxicology

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

20 pages, 2873 KiB  
Article
Environmental Assessment with Cage Exposure in the Neva Estuary, Baltic Sea: Metal Bioaccumulation and Physiologic Activity of Bivalve Molluscs
by Nadezhda Berezina, Alexey Maximov, Andrey Sharov, Yulia Gubelit and Sergei Kholodkevich
J. Mar. Sci. Eng. 2023, 11(9), 1756; https://doi.org/10.3390/jmse11091756 - 8 Sep 2023
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Abstract
The rise in anthropogenic impacts on the marine environment requires new water management. The use of a triadic approach (bioaccumulation, bioassay, and physiological biomarkers) has been shown to have good applicability for the comparative assessment of the environmental state of the Neva Estuary [...] Read more.
The rise in anthropogenic impacts on the marine environment requires new water management. The use of a triadic approach (bioaccumulation, bioassay, and physiological biomarkers) has been shown to have good applicability for the comparative assessment of the environmental state of the Neva Estuary (Gulf of Finland, Baltic Sea). The novelty of the methodological approach of the study was that it involved both active and passive bio-monitoring methods for assessing the quality of estuarine environment. The classical analyses of metal concentration in bottom sediments, in field biota (fish and molluscs), and in caged molluscs were accompanied by a bioassay of sediment toxicity using amphipods. The physiological state of molluscs kept in cages was assessed according to two functional characteristics, such as cardio-tolerance and metabolic activity (oxygen consumption rate), after exposition in cages. The method of active monitoring (caging exposure with molluscs) as a measurement of parameters in clean molluscs has proven itself well in controlling the accumulation of both metals and oil products. Macroalgae that are abundant in estuarine ecosystems are also good indicators of metals, at least showing the transition from bottom sediments to the next level of food webs. Unionid molluscs were found to be a more sensitive and effective indicator of contaminant accumulation than dreissenid molluscs, characterized by a low tolerance to changeable environmental conditions in the estuarine ecosystem and rather high mortality in cages. Our results have shown that caging exposure with unionids can be a widely used methodological approach for the assessment of estuarine environmental quality through the determination of metal concentrations in molluscs and their physiological state. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Metal Pollution and Marine Organisms)
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