Risk, Safety and Reliability Assessment in the Maritime and Offshore Industries

A special issue of Journal of Marine Science and Engineering (ISSN 2077-1312). This special issue belongs to the section "Marine Hazards".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (15 February 2024) | Viewed by 6749

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Centre for Seafaring and Maritime Operations, Australian Maritime College, University of Tasmania, Launceston, Australia
Interests: risk, safety, and reliability assessment; human error assessment; decarbonization; risk and safety management; marine and offshore engineering; human factor and safety engineering

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Guest Editor
School of Ocean Technology, Fisheries and Marine Institute, Memorial University of Newfoundland, St. John's, NL, Canada
Interests: maritime safety and risk analysis; accident modeling; program and project ‎management; human factor engineering; offshore renewable energy; risk ‎intelligence; marine operations and asset integrity management
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Historically, numerous accidents happened in the maritime and offshore industries. The consequences of these accidents are loss of life, financial loss, infrastructure damage/cargo damage, and environmental pollution. In order to address this concern in recent years, interest in risk, safety, and reliability assessment techniques for maritime and offshore industries has increased to the point where international organizations have made recommendations for the usage of particular assessment and management technologies. This Special Issue is dedicated to ‎papers focusing on the risk, safety, and reliability assessment in the marine and offshore industries. The purpose of the invited ‎papers is to publish the most exciting research ‎with respect to the above subjects. High-quality papers are encouraged for publication, related to various aspects, as mentioned below.

  • ‎Risk, safety, and reliability assessment and management;
  • Risk models for flooding, fire, and evacuation;
  • Engine room fires;
  • Safety consideration for LNG, LPG, methanol, hydrogen, and dual fuel system;
  • Artificial Intelligence applications for maritime and offshore safety;
  • ‎Risk and accident analysis and modeling;
  • ‎Impact of seafarers’/operator's training, experience and fatigue on human error;
  • Risk-based and reliability-centered maintenance;
  • Safety education and training;
  • ‎Pipeline failure;
  • ‎Arctic shipping;

Contributions from disciplines outside of, but related to, risk, safety, and reliability assessment are ‎encouraged.‎

Dr. Rabiul Islam
Dr. Sidum Adumene
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Journal of Marine Science and Engineering is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • risk, safety, and reliability assessment
  • human error assessment and management
  • maritime
  • offshore
  • human factor and human-centered design
  • accident analysis and modeling, risk-based and reliability-centered maintenance

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

17 pages, 5600 KiB  
Article
Reliability Assessment for Integrated Seaport Energy System Considering Multiple Thermal Inertia
by Tiankai Yang, Zhenzhong Sun, Yongliang Liang and Lichuan Liu
J. Mar. Sci. Eng. 2024, 12(4), 606; https://doi.org/10.3390/jmse12040606 - 31 Mar 2024
Viewed by 473
Abstract
With the rapid development of global trade, a large number of goods and resources are imported and exported via seaports. Multiple thermal loads and renewable energy merge into seaports, making the energy supply and demand structure increasingly complex. The traditional seaport becomes an [...] Read more.
With the rapid development of global trade, a large number of goods and resources are imported and exported via seaports. Multiple thermal loads and renewable energy merge into seaports, making the energy supply and demand structure increasingly complex. The traditional seaport becomes an integrated seaport energy system (ISES). Due to the complicated energy interaction of cooling, heating, electricity, and gas subsystems, the ISES urgently require reliable and secure operation. Hence, this paper proposes a new reliability assessment method for the ISES that considers thermal inertia. Firstly, the operational structure of the ISES is established considering multi-energy coupling relationships. Then, a two-stage optimal load curtailment model is constructed with multiple thermal inertias. In addition, the reliability assessment method for the ISES is proposed based on the sequential Monte Carlo simulation method. Simulations are presented to verify the effectiveness of the proposed method. Full article
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22 pages, 7570 KiB  
Article
A Prescriptive Model for Failure Analysis in Ship Machinery Monitoring Using Generative Adversarial Networks
by Baris Yigin and Metin Celik
J. Mar. Sci. Eng. 2024, 12(3), 493; https://doi.org/10.3390/jmse12030493 - 15 Mar 2024
Viewed by 639
Abstract
In recent years, advanced methods and smart solutions have been investigated for the safe, secure, and environmentally friendly operation of ships. Since data acquisition capabilities have improved, data processing has become of great importance for ship operators. In this study, we introduce a [...] Read more.
In recent years, advanced methods and smart solutions have been investigated for the safe, secure, and environmentally friendly operation of ships. Since data acquisition capabilities have improved, data processing has become of great importance for ship operators. In this study, we introduce a novel approach to ship machinery monitoring, employing generative adversarial networks (GANs) augmented with failure mode and effect analysis (FMEA), to address a spectrum of failure modes in diesel generators. GANs are emerging unsupervised deep learning models known for their ability to generate realistic samples that are used to amplify a number of failures within training datasets. Our model specifically targets critical failure modes, such as mechanical wear and tear on turbochargers and fuel injection system failures, which can have environmental effects, providing a comprehensive framework for anomaly detection. By integrating FMEA into our GAN model, we do not stop at detecting these failures; we also enable timely interventions and improvements in operational efficiency in the maritime industry. This methodology not only boosts the reliability of diesel generators, but also sets a precedent for prescriptive maintenance approaches in the maritime industry. The model was demonstrated with real-time data, including 33 features, gathered from a diesel generator installed on a 310,000 DWT oil tanker. The developed algorithm provides high-accuracy results, achieving 83.13% accuracy. The final model demonstrates a precision score of 36.91%, a recall score of 83.47%, and an F1 score of 51.18%. The model strikes a balance between precision and recall in order to eliminate operational drift and enables potential early action in identified positive cases. This study contributes to managing operational excellence in tanker ship fleets. Furthermore, this study could be expanded to enhance the current functionalities of engine health management software products. Full article
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23 pages, 2568 KiB  
Article
Analyzing Port State Control Data to Explore Future Improvements to GMDSS Training
by Raquel Esther Rey-Charlo, Jose Luis Cueto and Francisco Piniella
J. Mar. Sci. Eng. 2023, 11(12), 2379; https://doi.org/10.3390/jmse11122379 - 17 Dec 2023
Viewed by 982
Abstract
This article uses data generated by Port State Control (PSC) inspections of ships in national ports (Paris MoU) to assess their compliance with radio-communications safety regulations. By mainly applying binary logistic regression methods, the aim is to examine and understand the relationship between [...] Read more.
This article uses data generated by Port State Control (PSC) inspections of ships in national ports (Paris MoU) to assess their compliance with radio-communications safety regulations. By mainly applying binary logistic regression methods, the aim is to examine and understand the relationship between the severity of deficiencies in maritime communications and some characteristics of inspected ships. The raw data from the PSC detention database from 2005 to 2022 undergoes post-processing before being analyzed to explore patterns and coincidences with the rest of the potential risk areas. To do so, 23,725 PSC inspections were used. Several classification criteria have been proposed that can better gauge the risk related to distress communications at sea from the dataset. The results connect the probability of detention with the ship age at the inspection date, the flag of the registry, the type of ship, and the location of the port within the countries adhering to the Paris MoU. Another achievement is that the number of PSC inspections of maritime communications in a given period is a better indicator of the risk to safety than the total number of deficiencies detected in these inspections during the same period. This study also explores inspection deficiencies related to competency gaps identified in the Global Maritime Distress Safety System (GMDSS) operators, and precisely using the number of PSC inspections as a criterion of risk for safety is consistent with the recommendations of the Maritime Safety Committee Circular (2006), MSC.1/Circ.1208. Another finding from the time series is that a greater rate of decrease is identified for GMDSS equipment-related deficiencies compared to GMDSS training-related deficiencies. This alone poses a review of the refreshing courses and methods to maintain the General Operator Certificate (GOC) qualification to operate maritime radio communications facilities belonging to the (current and future) GMDSS. Full article
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20 pages, 4838 KiB  
Article
Safe Design of a Hydrogen-Powered Ship: CFD Simulation on Hydrogen Leakage in the Fuel Cell Room
by Wenfeng Guan, Ju Chen, Lijian Chen, Jiaolong Cao and Hongjun Fan
J. Mar. Sci. Eng. 2023, 11(3), 651; https://doi.org/10.3390/jmse11030651 - 20 Mar 2023
Cited by 9 | Viewed by 2917
Abstract
Adopting proton exchange membrane fuel cells fuelled by hydrogen presents a promising solution for the shipping industry’s deep decarbonisation. However, the potential safety risks associated with hydrogen leakage pose a significant challenge to the development of hydrogen-powered ships. This study examines the safe [...] Read more.
Adopting proton exchange membrane fuel cells fuelled by hydrogen presents a promising solution for the shipping industry’s deep decarbonisation. However, the potential safety risks associated with hydrogen leakage pose a significant challenge to the development of hydrogen-powered ships. This study examines the safe design principles and leakage risks of the hydrogen gas supply system of China’s first newbuilt hydrogen-powered ship. This study utilises the computational fluid dynamics tool FLACS to analyse the hydrogen dispersion behaviour and concentration distributions in the hydrogen fuel cell room based on the ship’s parameters. This study predicts the flammable gas cloud and time points when gas monitoring points first reach the hydrogen volume concentrations of 0.8% and 1.6% in various leakage scenarios, including four different diameters (1, 3, 5, and 10 mm) and five different directions. This study’s findings indicate that smaller hydrogen pipeline diameters contribute to increased hydrogen safety. Specifically, in the hydrogen fuel cell room, a single-point leakage in a hydrogen pipeline with an inner diameter not exceeding 3 mm eliminates the possibility of flammable gas cloud explosions. Following a 10 mm leakage diameter, the hydrogen concentration in nearly all room positions reaches 4.0% within 6 s of leakage. While the leakage diameter does not impact the location of the monitoring point that first activates the hydrogen leak alarm and triggers an emergency hydrogen supply shutdown, the presence of obstructions near hydrogen detectors and the leakage direction can affect it. These insights provide guidance on the optimal locations for hydrogen detectors in the fuel cell room and the pipeline diameters on hydrogen gas supply systems, which can facilitate the safe design of hydrogen-powered ships. Full article
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