Smart Biomaterials

A special issue of Journal of Functional Biomaterials (ISSN 2079-4983).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 March 2020) | Viewed by 17264

Special Issue Editor

Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Memphis, Memphis, TN, USA
Interests: chitosan; biopolymers; biofilm; local drug delivery; infection; orthopedics; wound healing
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Recent advances in biomaterials have led to the development of biomaterials that have the ability to sense and respond to stimuli to enhance functionality. Smart biomaterials include those that use biological or externally-applied signals to perform a task, such as release a drug, and degrade or change conformation. Smart biomaterial systems may incorporate polymers, metals, ceramics, or composites of multiple types of materials. Composite local drug delivery system can be engineered to release drugs at controlled times in response to electromagnetic, mechanical, or biological cues. Injectable drug delivery systems may be designed to bind to particular types of tissue in order to detect and/or treat diseased states, performing “theranostic” functions. Structural scaffolds incorporating enzyme-responsive elements allow for cellular control over degradation and drug release. Thermoreversible and shape memory materials change physical conformation upon stimulus, such as change in temperature or pH, which may be used to guide implantation, release therapeutics, or provide mechanical cues to cells or tissue. Progress in additive manufacturing, nanofabrication, and imaging have enabled advancements in smart biomaterial technology. This Special Issue invites original research and reviews that relate to the interdisciplinary field of smart biomaterials, including applications, fabrication, evaluation, regulatory issues, and future directions.

Prof. Jessica Amber D. Jennings
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Journal of Functional Biomaterials is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2700 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • stimuli-responsive
  • drug release
  • degradation
  • tissue engineering
  • drug delivery
  • shape-memory materials
  • thermoresponsive materials
  • pH-responsive materials

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

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16 pages, 2711 KiB  
Article
Temperature-Dependent Rheological and Viscoelastic Investigation of a Poly(2-methyl-2-oxazoline)-b-poly(2-iso-butyl-2-oxazoline)-b-poly(2-methyl-2-oxazoline)-Based Thermogelling Hydrogel
J. Funct. Biomater. 2019, 10(3), 36; https://doi.org/10.3390/jfb10030036 - 07 Aug 2019
Cited by 35 | Viewed by 6578
Abstract
The synthesis and characterization of an ABA triblock copolymer based on hydrophilic poly(2-methyl-2-oxazoline) (pMeOx) blocks A and a modestly hydrophobic poly(2-iso-butyl-2-oxazoline) (piBuOx) block B is described. Aqueous polymer solutions were prepared at different concentrations (1–20 wt %) and their [...] Read more.
The synthesis and characterization of an ABA triblock copolymer based on hydrophilic poly(2-methyl-2-oxazoline) (pMeOx) blocks A and a modestly hydrophobic poly(2-iso-butyl-2-oxazoline) (piBuOx) block B is described. Aqueous polymer solutions were prepared at different concentrations (1–20 wt %) and their thermogelling capability using visual observation was investigated at different temperatures ranging from 5 to 80 °C. As only a 20 wt % solution was found to undergo thermogelation, this concentration was investigated in more detail regarding its temperature-dependent viscoelastic profile utilizing various modes (strain or temperature sweep). The prepared hydrogels from this particular ABA triblock copolymer have interesting rheological and viscoelastic properties, such as reversible thermogelling and shear thinning, and may be used as bioink, which was supported by its very low cytotoxicity and initial printing experiments using the hydrogels. However, the soft character and low yield stress of the gels do not allow real 3D printing at this point. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Smart Biomaterials)
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Review

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20 pages, 1901 KiB  
Review
Stimuli-Responsive Drug Release from Smart Polymers
J. Funct. Biomater. 2019, 10(3), 34; https://doi.org/10.3390/jfb10030034 - 31 Jul 2019
Cited by 153 | Viewed by 10154
Abstract
Over the past 10 years, stimuli-responsive polymeric biomaterials have emerged as effective systems for the delivery of therapeutics. Persistent with ongoing efforts to minimize adverse effects, stimuli-responsive biomaterials are designed to release in response to either chemical, physical, or biological triggers. The stimuli-responsiveness [...] Read more.
Over the past 10 years, stimuli-responsive polymeric biomaterials have emerged as effective systems for the delivery of therapeutics. Persistent with ongoing efforts to minimize adverse effects, stimuli-responsive biomaterials are designed to release in response to either chemical, physical, or biological triggers. The stimuli-responsiveness of smart biomaterials may improve spatiotemporal specificity of release. The material design may be used to tailor smart polymers to release a drug when particular stimuli are present. Smart biomaterials may use internal or external stimuli as triggering mechanisms. Internal stimuli-responsive smart biomaterials include those that respond to specific enzymes or changes in microenvironment pH; external stimuli can consist of electromagnetic, light, or acoustic energy; with some smart biomaterials responding to multiple stimuli. This review looks at current and evolving stimuli-responsive polymeric biomaterials in their proposed applications. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Smart Biomaterials)
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