Global Expert Views on Alzheimer's Disease, Dementia and Rehabilitation

A special issue of Journal of Clinical Medicine (ISSN 2077-0383). This special issue belongs to the section "Clinical Neurology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 November 2024 | Viewed by 1467

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
ADOLOR Research Group, Department of Medical-Surgical Therapy, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Extremadura University, 06006 Badajoz, Spain
Interests: cognition; episodic memory; exercise; memory; physical activity; rehabilitation; non-pharmacological therapies

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Guest Editor
ADOLOR Research Group, Department of Medical-Surgical Therapy, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Extremadura University, 06006 Badajoz, Spain
Interests: cognition; episodic memory; exercise; memory; physical activity; rehabilitation; non-pharmacological therapies

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
ADOLOR Research Group, Department of Medical-Surgical Therapy, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Extremadura University, 06006 Badajoz, Spain
Interests: cognition; episodic memory; exercise; memory; physical activity; rehabilitation; non-pharmacological therapies

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Research shows that dementia and Alzheimer's are leading causes of the need for residential care in older adults. Estimates indicate that approximately 46 million people worldwide suffer from these conditions.

Medical evidence shows that both pharmacological and integrated non-pharmacological treatment, such as physical and cognitive rehabilitation, can improve the symptomatology of these patients, with a favorable impact on their quality of life.

For a forthcoming Special Issue of the Journal of Clinical Medicine (indexed in PubMed), we invite researchers to contribute original research articles (priority will be given to experimental studies) as well as review articles that stimulate continued efforts to better understand the relationship between rehabilitation and Alzheimer's disease and dementia.

Potential issues may include, but are not limited to:

  • The effects of exercise on Alzheimer's disease and dementia;
  • The effects of physical and cognitive rehabilitation on Alzheimer's disease and dementia;
  • New non-pharmacological therapies in the management of symptoms of Alzheimer's disease and dementia;
  • Multidisciplinary approaches to Alzheimer’s disease and dementia;
  • Cellular, molecular and psychological mechanisms that may influence the Alzheimer's disease and dementia process.

Dr. Juan Rodríguez-Mansilla
Dr. Cristoforo Comi
Dr. María Jiménez-Palomares
Dr. Blanca Gonzalez-Sanchez
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Journal of Clinical Medicine is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • cognition
  • dementia
  • rehabilitation
  • exercise
  • memory
  • physical activity
  • Alzheimer’s disease
  • non-pharmacological therapies

Published Papers (1 paper)

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16 pages, 3147 KiB  
Systematic Review
Benefits of Music Therapy in the Cognitive Impairments of Alzheimer’s-Type Dementia: A Systematic Review
by María Jiménez-Palomares, Elisa María Garrido-Ardila, Elena Chávez-Bravo, Silvia Teresa Torres-Piles, Blanca González-Sánchez, María Jesús Rodríguez-Mansilla, Álvaro De Toro-García and Juan Rodríguez-Mansilla
J. Clin. Med. 2024, 13(7), 2042; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm13072042 - 01 Apr 2024
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Abstract
Background/Objective: Alzheimer’s disease is a condition that can cause memory, thinking, and behaviour impairments. This type of dementia affects approximately 50 million people globally. Currently, there is no remedy for this disease, but there are different treatment approaches, both pharmacological and non-pharmacological, [...] Read more.
Background/Objective: Alzheimer’s disease is a condition that can cause memory, thinking, and behaviour impairments. This type of dementia affects approximately 50 million people globally. Currently, there is no remedy for this disease, but there are different treatment approaches, both pharmacological and non-pharmacological, that try to alleviate the symptoms. The remarkable fact about Alzheimer’s response to music is that musical abilities can be preserved even though language could be lost. The objective of this systematic review is to assess the benefits of music therapy on cognitive impairments in older adults with Alzheimer’s disease. Methods: This is a systematic review carried out following the PRISMA guidelines. The literature searches were conducted in the following databases: PubMed, SCOPUS, Cochrane Library, and Dialnet. The inclusion criteria established were as follows: randomised controlled studies and clinical trials published in English and Spanish from 2010 to 2024, patients diagnosed with dementia of the Alzheimer’s type, aged 65 years or older, who had participated in music interventions and had cognitive changes. Results: Eleven studies were included in this review. They showed that music therapy interventions mainly improved memory, language, and orientation. The results of a methodological quality analysis showed that six of the articles had good methodological quality and four had excellent methodological quality. Conclusions: The results of this review suggest that treatment with music therapy improves cognitive impairments in patients with Alzheimer’s disease. In addition, we can be sure that music creates a link between the patient and the specialist. Full article
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