Innovative Research in Periodontology and Implantology

A special issue of Journal of Clinical Medicine (ISSN 2077-0383). This special issue belongs to the section "Dentistry, Oral Surgery and Oral Medicine".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 25 July 2024 | Viewed by 5366

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
1. School of Medicine & Dentistry, Griffith University, Brisbane, QLD 4111, Australia
2. Division of Oral Diseases, Department of Dental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, OF Odontologi, OF Orala sjukdomar, 171 77 Stockholm, Sweden
Interests: immunology; microbiology; periodontal disease; oral disease

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Guest Editor
School of Medicine and Dentistry, Griffith University, Gold Coast Campus, Health Building G40 floor 7, Nathan, QLD 4222, Australia
Interests: orthodontics; biomaterials; dental implants; implant surface

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Guest Editor
School of Medicine and Dentistry, Griffith University, Gold Coast Campus, Nathan, QLD 4222, Australia
Interests: biomaterials; stem cells; tissue engineering; dental implants; inflammation; immune response
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

We are pleased to announce the launch of a new Special Issue entitled "Innovative Research in Periodontology and Implantology". We invite in vitro and in vivo submissions related to pathogenesis, regeneration, surface developments, and medicine-related topics in periodontology and implantology. The global prevalence of periodontal disease is high, with the severe form now higher than 10%. Although dental implants remain the preferred treatment procedure to replace missing teeth, they are often associated with early and late biological complications that can lead to implant failure. Among late failures, peri-implant diseases have become our main concern. Biomarker modulation and implant surface improvements have also been targeted to prevent irreversible tissue damage around teeth and implants. Moreover, regenerative therapies have been developed to deal with the tissue damage caused by periodontitis and peri-implantitis.  

Our main goal is to publish original research in basic and clinical periodontology and implantology. Systematic and narrative reviews will also be considered in this Special Issue. 

Prof. Dr. Carlos Marcelo da Silva Figueredo
Dr. Daniel Fernandes
Dr. Stephen Hamlet
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Journal of Clinical Medicine is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

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Keywords

  • periodontal disease
  • peri-implantitis
  • gingivitis
  • diagnosis
  • biomarkers
  • etiology
  • pathogenesis
  • systemic diseases
  • prevention
  • treatment

Published Papers (4 papers)

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11 pages, 668 KiB  
Article
Effect of Nonsurgical Periodontal Treatment on Salivary and Plasma Superoxide Dismutase Levels of Patients Suffering from Periodontitis
by Tanja Veljovic, Milanko Djuric, Jelena Mirnic, Ivana Gusic, Aleksandra Maletin, Stojan Ivic, Marija Stojilkovic and Snezana Brkic
J. Clin. Med. 2023, 12(20), 6688; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm12206688 - 23 Oct 2023
Viewed by 808
Abstract
Antioxidant capacity is frequently measured by evaluating superoxide dismutase (SOD) concentration in body fluids. The aim of this study was to compare SOD concentrations in the saliva and plasma of patients with periodontitis to those measured in a group of patients with healthy [...] Read more.
Antioxidant capacity is frequently measured by evaluating superoxide dismutase (SOD) concentration in body fluids. The aim of this study was to compare SOD concentrations in the saliva and plasma of patients with periodontitis to those measured in a group of patients with healthy periodontium, as well as to evaluate the influence of nonsurgical periodontal therapy on salivary and plasma SOD in periodontitis patients. For this purpose, 40 systemically healthy patients aged 30–70 years who had at least 20 teeth were recruited, 20 of whom had periodontitis, and 20 served as healthy periodontitis-free controls. In all participants, periodontal status was assessed via the plaque index (PI), gingival index (GI), papilla bleeding index (PIB), probing depth (PD), and clinical attachment level (CAL), and the SOD concentration in both saliva and plasma was determined by conducting a commercial immunoenzymatic ELISA test. In periodontitis patients, periodontal indices and saliva and blood samples were taken at the beginning of the study, as well as 3 months after periodontal therapy, while in the control group, these data were gathered at the beginning of the study only. SOD values in the saliva of patients with periodontitis (0.244 U/µL) were statistically significantly higher compared with patients with healthy periodontium (0.017 U/µL). Moreover, periodontal therapy led to a statistically significant decrease in this marker in the saliva of patients with periodontitis (p = 0.023), which was comparable with that measured in the control group. On the other hand, no statistically significant differences were noted in plasma SOD values either between the two groups or at follow-up compared with baseline in the group with periodontitis. These findings suggest that the elevated salivary SOD in patients with periodontal disease may represent a mechanism of tissue protection against oxidative stress that occurs in response to periodontal disease. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Innovative Research in Periodontology and Implantology)
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13 pages, 447 KiB  
Article
The Relationship between Hypertension and Periodontitis: A Cross-Sectional Study
by Rossana Abud Cabrera Rosa, João Victor Soares Rodrigues, Marina Module Cláudio, João Paulo Soares Franciscon, Gabriel Mulinari-Santos, Thamiris Cirelli, Rafael Scaf de Molon, Valdir Gouveia Garcia and Leticia Helena Theodoro
J. Clin. Med. 2023, 12(15), 5140; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm12155140 - 05 Aug 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 2024
Abstract
Recent evidence suggests an association between hypertension and periodontitis, although the pathways and implications underlying both chronic conditions are still poorly understood. Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate the relationship between hypertension and periodontitis through an observational clinical study using [...] Read more.
Recent evidence suggests an association between hypertension and periodontitis, although the pathways and implications underlying both chronic conditions are still poorly understood. Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate the relationship between hypertension and periodontitis through an observational clinical study using periodontal, physical, and biochemical analyses in hypertensive and non-hypertensive individuals with periodontitis. A total of one hundred patients were divided into two groups. The first group was hypertensive patients with periodontitis. The second group was non-hypertensive patients with periodontitis. Periodontal parameters of probing depth, bleeding on probing, and clinical attachment level were evaluated. The systolic, diastolic, mean, and differential blood pressure were measured in the physical examination. In addition, body mass index and waist–hip ratio were verified. Biochemical tests for glycated hemoglobin, fasting blood glucose, estimated blood glucose, total cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein, creatinine, glutamate pyruvate transaminase, glutamic oxaloacetic transaminase, and C-reactive protein were evaluated. The data were submitted for statistical analysis (α = 0.05%). The results of this study demonstrated that patients with cardiovascular disease did not present with worse periodontal clinical parameters in the conditions studied. However, it is important to bear in mind that this cross-sectional study has some inherent limitations to its design; therefore, to study the relationship between hypertension and periodontitis further, an interventional randomized clinical trial should be conducted. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Innovative Research in Periodontology and Implantology)
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13 pages, 9691 KiB  
Article
The Resolution of Periodontal Inflammation Promotes Changes in Cytokine Expression in the Intestine and Gingival Tissues of Aged Rats with DSS-Induced Colitis
by João Martins de Mello-Neto, Edilson Ervolino, Gayathiri Elangovan, Luan Felipe Toro, Jaehee Lee, Anders Gustafsson and Carlos Marcelo da Silva Figueredo
J. Clin. Med. 2023, 12(13), 4326; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm12134326 - 27 Jun 2023
Viewed by 999
Abstract
Our research aimed to explore how resolving periodontal inflammation impacts cytokine expression in the colons of aged Wistar rats. Research studies involving animals have been conducted to investigate the two-way relationship between periodontitis and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), where chronic inflammation in either [...] Read more.
Our research aimed to explore how resolving periodontal inflammation impacts cytokine expression in the colons of aged Wistar rats. Research studies involving animals have been conducted to investigate the two-way relationship between periodontitis and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), where chronic inflammation in either the mouth or intestines can negatively affect the other. We allocated seventeen male Wistar rats aged between 8 and 11 months to one of four groups: (1) ligature-induced periodontitis (LIP) without the resolution of periodontal inflammation (RPI) (LIP; n = 4), (2) LIP + RPI (n = 4), (3) LIP + dextran-sulphate-sodium-induced colitis (DIC) without RPI (n = 4), and LIP + DIC + RPI (n = 5). We performed histopathological and immunological analyses on periodontal and intestinal tissues and analysed cytokine expressions using a Rat Cytokine 23-Plex Immunoassay. Our findings showed that animals with and without DIC who underwent RPI showed significantly lower levels of IL-2, IL-4, IL-5, IL-10, IL-13, IL-17, IL-18, and TNF-α in the intestine compared to those without treatment. The RPI effectively reduced the number of inflammatory cells in the lamina propria and restored the epithelial barrier in the intestine in animals with DIC. The resolution of periodontal inflammation significantly reduced the levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines in the intestines of aged rats with and without DSS-induced colitis. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Innovative Research in Periodontology and Implantology)
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10 pages, 2051 KiB  
Article
A Novel Irrigation System to Reduce Heat Generation during Guided Implantology: An In Vitro Study
by Somayeh Parvizi, Andrew Cameron, Santosh Tadakamadla, Carlos Marcelo S. Figueredo and Peter Reher
J. Clin. Med. 2023, 12(12), 3944; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm12123944 - 09 Jun 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 983
Abstract
The purpose of this in vitro study is to evaluate the effectiveness of incorporating a new irrigation system into a surgical guide and monitor its effect on heat generation during implant bed preparation. A total of 48 surgically guided osteotomies were performed on [...] Read more.
The purpose of this in vitro study is to evaluate the effectiveness of incorporating a new irrigation system into a surgical guide and monitor its effect on heat generation during implant bed preparation. A total of 48 surgically guided osteotomies were performed on 12 bovine ribs divided into 4 groups, using different irrigation techniques: Group A (test) had entry and exit channels incorporated into the guide; Group B had a similar design with an entry channel only; Group C had conventional external irrigation; and Group D (control) had no irrigation. Heat generation during the osteotomies was measured using thermocouples placed at a depth of 2 mm and 6 mm. The lowest mean temperature was observed in Group A (22.1 °C at 2 mm and 21.4 °C at 6 mm), which was statistically significant when compared with Groups C and D (p < 0.001). Group A showed a lower mean temperature compared with Group B as well; however, it was statistically significant only at 6 mm depth (p < 0.05). In conclusion, the proposed surgical guide has significantly reduced heat generation during implant osteotomy compared to conventional external irrigation. The integration of an exit cooling channel can resolve limitations found in previously designed surgical guides such as debris blockage and can be easily incorporated into computer designing and 3D printing software. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Innovative Research in Periodontology and Implantology)
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