Recent Advancements and Challenges in Vascular Surgery

A special issue of Journal of Clinical Medicine (ISSN 2077-0383). This special issue belongs to the section "Vascular Medicine".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 20 November 2024 | Viewed by 833

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Department of Surgery, University of Auckland, Auckland, New Zealand
Interests: aortic disease; rare vascular diseases; peripheral artery disease; outcome based research

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Guest Editor
Department of Surgical Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden
Interests: aortic aneurysm; aortic dissection; surgical outcome research

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

There is perhaps no specialty that has seen more rapid progression and advancements in delivering care than vascular surgery. Training for vascular surgery has parted from the traditional general or cardiac surgery model, into dedicated vascular training in endovascular and open surgery in many parts of the world. With a wide range of procedures performed in different anatomical locations, vascular surgery has formed strong links with multiple medical and surgical specialties. In addition, this advancement could not be possible without improvements in medical imaging and strong collaboration with radiology.

With this technology, major challenges are seen with workforces and delivering vascular services, particularly in remote areas, training surgeons in both endovascular and open surgical skills, and an older cohort of patients that have improved life expectancy but which might still have risk factors. The shift from aortic diseases to an older population and the challenges of a younger population with a higher prevalence of diabetes, obesity and renal disease pose a potential area of unmet need.

Aim and the Scope of the Special Issue:

This Special Issue aims to report recent advancements in vascular surgery including epidemiological, treatment, and outcome data. It will also highlight some of the challenges facing vascular surgery to help the future delivery of high-quality care to vascular patients.

Dr. Manar Khashram
Dr. Kevin Mani
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Journal of Clinical Medicine is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • vascular diseases
  • vascular imaging
  • training
  • data monitoring

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

10 pages, 605 KiB  
Article
Effect of EVAR on International Ruptured AAA Mortality—Sex and Geographic Disparities
by C. Y. Maximilian Png, A. Alaska Pendleton, Martin Altreuther, Jacob W. Budtz-Lilly, Kim Gunnarsson, Chung-Dann Kan, Manar Khashram, Matti T. Laine, Kevin Mani, Christian C. Pederson, Sunita D. Srivastava and Matthew J. Eagleton
J. Clin. Med. 2024, 13(9), 2464; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm13092464 - 23 Apr 2024
Viewed by 526
Abstract
Background: We sought to investigate the differential impact of EVAR (endovascular aneurysm repair) vis-à-vis OSR (open surgical repair) on ruptured AAA (abdominal aortic aneurysm) mortality by sex and geographically. Methods: We performed a retrospective study of administrative data on EVAR from [...] Read more.
Background: We sought to investigate the differential impact of EVAR (endovascular aneurysm repair) vis-à-vis OSR (open surgical repair) on ruptured AAA (abdominal aortic aneurysm) mortality by sex and geographically. Methods: We performed a retrospective study of administrative data on EVAR from state statistical agencies, vascular registries, and academic publications, as well as ruptured AAA mortality rates from the World Health Organization for 14 14 states across Australasia, East Asia, Europe, and North America. Results: Between 2011–2016, the proportion of treatment of ruptured AAAs by EVAR increased from 26.1 to 43.8 percent among females, and from 25.7 to 41.2 percent among males, and age-adjusted ruptured AAA mortality rates fell from 12.62 to 9.50 per million among females, and from 34.14 to 26.54 per million among males. The association of EVAR with reduced mortality was more than three times larger (2.2 vis-à-vis 0.6 percent of prevalence per 10 percentage point increase in EVAR) among females than males. The association of EVAR with reduced mortality was substantially larger (1.7 vis-à-vis 1.1 percent of prevalence per 10 percentage point increase in EVAR) among East Asian states than European+ states. Conclusions: The increasing adoption of EVAR coincided with a decrease in ruptured AAA mortality. The relationship between EVAR and mortality was more pronounced among females than males, and in East Asian than European+ states. Sex and ethnic heterogeneity should be further investigated. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recent Advancements and Challenges in Vascular Surgery)
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