Current Practice and Future Perspectives of Neurological Conditions Caused by Neurodegeneration

A special issue of Journal of Clinical Medicine (ISSN 2077-0383). This special issue belongs to the section "Clinical Neurology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 25 March 2024 | Viewed by 1561

Special Issue Editor

IRCCS Centro Neurolesi Bonino Pulejo, 98124 Messina, Italy
Interests: neurodegenerative diseases; amyotrophic lateral sclerosis; multiple sclerosis; Parkinson's disease; Alzheimer's disease; Huntington's disease; multiple system atrophy; prion diseases
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

In recent decades researchers have been trying to enhance the development of reliable biomarkers for neurodegenerative diseases, while medical practice has been moving toward precision medicine. However, there is still an urgent need to identify disease-specific biomarkers to improve the early diagnostic workup, favor clinical classification and prognostic models, and facilitate the development of effective disease-modifying therapies. Most neurodegenerative disorders, including Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, multiple sclerosis and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, are late onset, meaning there is some factor that changes as a person ages for each disease. One constant factor is that in each disease, neurons gradually lose function as the disease progresses with age. About 20–40% of healthy people between 60 and 78 years old experience discernable decrements in cognitive performance in several domains, including working, spatial, episodic memory, and processing speed.

This Special Issue aims to highlight the current knowledge regarding neurodegeneration pathogenic mechanisms and underline possible current practices and future perspectives in neurodegenerative diseases.

In this Special Issue, original articles and reviews are welcome. We look forward to receiving your contributions.

Dr. Lilla Bonanno
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Journal of Clinical Medicine is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • neurodegenerative diseases
  • amyotrophic lateral sclerosis
  • multiple sclerosis
  • Parkinson's disease
  • Alzheimer's disease
  • Huntington's disease
  • multiple system atrophy
  • prion diseases

Published Papers (2 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Jump to: Other

19 pages, 1108 KiB  
Article
Unlocking the Protective Potential of Upper Respiratory Infection Treatment Histories against Alzheimer’s Disease: A Korean Adult Population Study
J. Clin. Med. 2024, 13(1), 260; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm13010260 - 02 Jan 2024
Viewed by 549
Abstract
With increasing interest in the inflammation-pathogen infection hypothesis and its potential links to Alzheimer’s disease (AD) development, there is growing consideration of using upper respiratory infection (URI) treatments as interventions for AD. This nested case–control study explored the potential association between prior URI [...] Read more.
With increasing interest in the inflammation-pathogen infection hypothesis and its potential links to Alzheimer’s disease (AD) development, there is growing consideration of using upper respiratory infection (URI) treatments as interventions for AD. This nested case–control study explored the potential association between prior URI histories and AD development in a Korean adult population using the national health screening cohort data (2002–2019). The study included 26,920 AD patients and 107,680 matched control individuals, focusing on those seeking respiratory treatment. Logistic regression analyses assessed the impact of URI histories and treatment on AD risk while adjusting for covariates. Our results revealed that over a 1-year period, individuals with URI histories (≥1, ≥2, or ≥3 instances) exhibited decreasing probabilities of developing AD, with risk reductions of 19%, 15%, and 12%, respectively. Expanding our investigation to a 2-year period consistently showed a 17% reduction in AD risk. This effect remained robust across diverse demographic groups and after adjusting for covariates, encompassing comorbidities, hypertension, hyperlipidemia, blood glucose levels, and lifestyle factors. Subgroup analyses further substantiated this association. In conclusion, our findings cautiously suggest a potential protective role of prior URI treatment histories in mitigating the risk of AD development. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Other

Jump to: Research

11 pages, 487 KiB  
Systematic Review
REM Sleep Behavior Disorder and Cognitive Functions in Parkinson’s Patients: A Systematic Review
J. Clin. Med. 2023, 12(23), 7397; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm12237397 - 29 Nov 2023
Viewed by 814
Abstract
Sleep disorders, such as REM sleep behavior disorder (RBD) and excessive daytime sleepiness, are among the most common non-motor symptoms in subjects with Parkinson’s disease (PD). Sleep disorders have a major negative impact on the quality of life of patients and their caregivers. [...] Read more.
Sleep disorders, such as REM sleep behavior disorder (RBD) and excessive daytime sleepiness, are among the most common non-motor symptoms in subjects with Parkinson’s disease (PD). Sleep disorders have a major negative impact on the quality of life of patients and their caregivers. In addition, REM sleep behavior disorder is an important risk factor for cognitive impairment in PD. This systematic review was conducted on studies investigating the influence of RBD on cognitive performance in PD subjects. We searched the PubMed and Scopus databases, screened the references of the studies included, and reviewed articles for additional citations. From the first 244 publications, we included only 11 studies that met the search criteria. The results showed that sleep disorders in PD were associated with impaired executive functions, visual-constructive abilities, reduced attention, and episodic verbal memory, and could predict the possible risk of developing dementia. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop