Clinical Updates in Reproductive Endocrinology

A special issue of Journal of Clinical Medicine (ISSN 2077-0383). This special issue belongs to the section "Obstetrics & Gynecology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 25 March 2024 | Viewed by 2222

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Iwona Bojar
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Women’s Health, Institute of Rural Health in Lublin, Lublin, Poland
Interests: endocrine gynecology; reproductive endocrinology; endocrine diseases in pregnancy; infertility; menopause; antiaging medicine
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
1. Department of Medical Statistics, School of Public Health, Center of Postgraduate Medical Education, 01-826 Warsaw, Poland
2. Department of Demography, Institute of Statistics and Demography, Collegium of Economic Analyses, SGH Warsaw School of Economics, 02-554 Warsaw, Poland
Interests: public health; health promotion and biostatistics; infertility and endocrinology problems; mental health and quality of life
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Several problems in reproductive endocrinology still represent a challenge. This is mainly due to the continued search for better diagnostic and therapeutic methods that enable having healthy children. We have observed increasing problems with fertility, especially in highly developed countries. One of the reasons for this is that reproductive endocrinology is still not sufficiently researched. There are a number of endocrine disorders that make it difficult to get pregnant and complicate the course of pregnancy. Furthermore, an underestimated number of patients with endocrine disorders suffer from mental problems that affect their reproduction ability. An equally important issue is the improvement in the quality of life of people struggling with endocrine problems while trying to conceive and the late consequences (metabolic and psychological) of the treatment of endocrine disorders during the reproductive period. Despite international guidelines and consensus updates around the world, gaps in the literature persist in all the abovementioned areas. This Special Issue aims to present a comprehensive review of advances in the diagnosis and treatment of reproductive endocrine disorders, with a particular emphasis on the clinical application of the latest findings in the treatment of infertility and the subsequent consequences of endocrine diseases. Researchers in the field of reproductive endocrinology are encouraged to contribute their research findings in the form of original articles, meta-analyses or reviews to this Special Issue.

Prof. Dr. Iwona Bojar
Prof. Dr. Dorota Raczkiewicz
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • reproductive endocrinology
  • endocrine diseases in pregnancy
  • infertility
  • endocrine diagnostics in infertility
  • long-term consequences of endocrine disorders
  • therapy of endocrine disorders

Published Papers (2 papers)

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15 pages, 617 KiB  
Article
Aberrant HPO Axis Alterations and Autoimmune Abnormalities in PCOS Patients with DOR: A Retrospective Analysis
J. Clin. Med. 2023, 12(16), 5212; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm12165212 - 10 Aug 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 838
Abstract
Background: There is a group of polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) patients in clinic who have diminished ovarian reserve (DOR) in combination. This study was designed to evaluate the differences in glucolipid metabolism, hypothalamic–pituitary–ovarian (HPO) axis-related parameters, and autoimmune antibodies in PCOS patients with [...] Read more.
Background: There is a group of polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) patients in clinic who have diminished ovarian reserve (DOR) in combination. This study was designed to evaluate the differences in glucolipid metabolism, hypothalamic–pituitary–ovarian (HPO) axis-related parameters, and autoimmune antibodies in PCOS patients with and without DOR. Methods: A total of 2307 PCOS patients, including 1757 patients with PCOS alone and 550 patients who have both PCOS and DOR, were enrolled in this retrospective study. Parameters of glucolipid metabolism, HPO axis-related parameters, and autoimmune antibodies were measured and analyzed. Results: The prevalence of DOR among all patients with PCOS was 23.84%. Many HPO axis-related parameters, such as follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), luteinizing hormone (LH), estradiol (E2), and prolactin (PRL) were significantly different in PCOS with DOR compared with PCOS without DOR. The FSH levels were positively correlated with LH, testosterone (T), and androstenedione (AD) levels, but had no association with glucolipid metabolism after adjusting for body mass index (BMI). Moreover, anti-ovarian antibody (AOAb) and anti-21-OH antibody (21-OHAb) levels were significantly elevated in PCOS patients with DOR. Conclusions: PCOS patients with DOR showed more chaotic HPO axis hormone levels and elevated autoimmune antibodies, suggesting that autoimmune factors may be the cause of DOR in women with PCOS. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Clinical Updates in Reproductive Endocrinology)
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16 pages, 2308 KiB  
Systematic Review
Depression in Polycystic Ovary Syndrome: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis
J. Clin. Med. 2023, 12(20), 6446; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm12206446 - 10 Oct 2023
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1101
Abstract
Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is an endocrine disorder with a broad spectrum of clinical symptoms. Some of the serious complications of PCOS are mental disorders including depression. Therefore, the aim of the meta-analysis was to determine the prevalence, mean level, standardized mean difference [...] Read more.
Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is an endocrine disorder with a broad spectrum of clinical symptoms. Some of the serious complications of PCOS are mental disorders including depression. Therefore, the aim of the meta-analysis was to determine the prevalence, mean level, standardized mean difference and probability of depression based on the research conducted with the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS). A systematic literature search was performed using the following databases: PubMed, EMBASE, Scopus, ClinicalTrials.gov and Google for research published until January 2023. The meta-analysis was conducted on a group of 4002 patients obtained from 19 studies, which met the inclusion criteria (adult pre-menopausal women diagnosed with PCOS, papers on the prevalence of depression or the HADS scoring). According to the research performed, the mean prevalence of depression was 31% (I2 = 93%; p < 0.001), whereas the mean HADS depression score in patients with PCOS was 6.31 (I2 = 93%; p < 0.001). The standardized difference of mean depression scores was SMD = 0.421 (95% confidence interval = 0.17–0.68, I2 = 67%). The overall probability of depression in PCOS patients was more than 2.5-fold higher than in healthy women ((RR: 2.58), confidence interval [1.38–4.85]; I2 = 90%, p < 0.001). The research results imply an increased risk of depressive symptoms in women with PCOS. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Clinical Updates in Reproductive Endocrinology)
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