Clinical Management of Patients with Cognitive Disorders

A special issue of Journal of Clinical Medicine (ISSN 2077-0383). This special issue belongs to the section "Clinical Neurology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 10 April 2024 | Viewed by 339

Special Issue Editor

IRCCS Centro Neurolesi Bonino-Pulejo, S.S. 113 Via Palermo, C.da Casazza, 98124 Messina, Italy
Interests: neuropsychology; neurodegenerative disorders; cognitive rehabilitation

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Cognitive disorders are common symptoms of neurodegenerative and other neurological diseases, such as trauma and stroke. They have a substantial impact on daily life functioning and represent a growing public health concern with significant social and economic implications.

Appropriate management includes the recognition of cognitive deficit presentations and timing throughout the disease course, and the incorporation of different therapeutic strategies (pharmacological and non-pharmacological) to focus on improving quality of life, promoting functional status, limiting residual defects, and on reducing the caregiver's burden. Unfortunately, the therapeutic options for these conditions remain limited and often ineffective.

The goal of this Special Issue is to provide scientific evidence for the latest and most advanced research on management of cognitive disorders, including the potential contribution of new approaches for brain training. We encourage authors to submit original research articles, critical reviews, in-depth reviews.

Dr. Viviana Lo Buono
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Journal of Clinical Medicine is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • cognitive Disorders
  • clinical Management
  • cognition
  • rehabilitation
  • digital Therapeutics
  • quality of life
  • physical exercise training

Published Papers (1 paper)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Other

11 pages, 1754 KiB  
Systematic Review
Cognitive Enhancement Strategies for Older Adults: An Evaluation of Different Training Modalities to Improve Executive Function—A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis
J. Clin. Med. 2024, 13(5), 1301; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm13051301 - 25 Feb 2024
Viewed by 180
Abstract
(1) Background: The aging population is expected to triple by 2050. Executive functions decline with age, impacting daily tasks, and this is associated with neurodegenerative diseases. Aerobic and resistance exercises positively affect cognitive function in older adults by influencing growth markers. However, [...] Read more.
(1) Background: The aging population is expected to triple by 2050. Executive functions decline with age, impacting daily tasks, and this is associated with neurodegenerative diseases. Aerobic and resistance exercises positively affect cognitive function in older adults by influencing growth markers. However, the modalities of exercise and the optimal parameters for maximum cognitive benefits remain unclear. (2) Methods: A meta-analysis of randomized clinical trials (RCTs) was conducted. The systematic search was on slowing cognitive decline and performed in the PubMed/MEDLINE and Cochrane Library databases. Articles were included if participants were ≥65 years, healthy, and performing resistance or aerobic exercise, and they were excluded if there was a combination of training and if they have neurological disease or cognitive impairment. (3) Results: The search strategy found a total of 1635 studies. After removing duplicates and assessing the inclusion and exclusion criteria, eight articles were included in the meta-analysis, with a total of 463 healthy older adults analyzed. No significant differences between the intervention groups and the control groups after the aerobic or resistance programs were found. (4) Conclusions: Aerobic exercise interventions improved executive function more than resistance training in older adults, but without statistically significant differences. This can serve as a guide to see, with caution, whether we need a multidisciplinary approach to be more effective in improving the cortical health of older adults. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Clinical Management of Patients with Cognitive Disorders)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop