Diabetic Foot and Other Complications of Diabetes: Clinical Management and Prevention

A special issue of Journal of Clinical Medicine (ISSN 2077-0383). This special issue belongs to the section "Endocrinology & Metabolism".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 25 September 2024 | Viewed by 1445

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
1. Diabetic Foot Unit, Facultad de Enfermería, Fisioterapia y Podología, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, 28040 Madrid, Spain
2. Instituto de Investigación Sanitaria del Hospital Clínico San Carlos (IdISSC), 28040 Madrid, Spain
Interests: diabetic foot; diabetic foot ulcers; diabetic foot prevention; diabetic foot ostemyelitis; biomechanics; charcot foot

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Guest Editor
1. Diabetic Foot Unit, Faculty of Nursing, Physiotherapy, and Podiatry, Complutense University of Madrid, 28040 Madrid, Spain
2. Health Research Institute of the San Carlos Clinical Hospital (IdISSC), 28040 Madrid, Spain
Interests: diabetic foot; diabetic foot osteomyelitis; diabetic neuropathy; diabetic foot care

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

In spite of the recent advancements achieved in the diagnosis and treatment of diabetes, the disease is still considered a global epidemic, and the effects of diabetic foot and other complications contribute to worse survival rates than common cancers such us prostate or breast cancer. In addition, these complications are a leading cause of disability and decreased quality of life; however, these outcomes are readily preventable with evidence-based disease care. In this Special Issue, we hope to compile up-to-date articles and reviews on aspects of the diabetic foot and other complications of diabetes, ranging from a multidisciplinary approach to the prevention and management of these serious complications.

Dr. Raúl J. Molines Barroso
Dr. Irene Sanz-Corbalan
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • diabetic foot
  • prevention
  • epidemiology
  • pathogenesis
  • complications
  • polineuropathy
  • neuropathic pain
  • vascular disease
  • charcot foot
  • diabetic foot infections
  • treatment strategies

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

10 pages, 557 KiB  
Article
Intra-Observer and Inter-Observer Reliability of Ankle Circumference Measurement in Patients with Diabetic Foot: A Prospective Observational Study
by David Montoro-Cremades, Aroa Tardáguila-García, David Navarro-Pérez, Yolanda García-Álvarez, Mateo López-Moral and José Luis Lázaro-Martínez
J. Clin. Med. 2023, 12(22), 7166; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm12227166 - 18 Nov 2023
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Abstract
Inflammation, being a typical response to vascular tissue alterations, induces variations in tissue oxygen diffusion pressure. Diabetic microangiopathy, an inflammatory process, is characterized by an increase in vascular flow at rest, reduced venous and arteriolar responses, and increased capillary permeability, resulting in oedema [...] Read more.
Inflammation, being a typical response to vascular tissue alterations, induces variations in tissue oxygen diffusion pressure. Diabetic microangiopathy, an inflammatory process, is characterized by an increase in vascular flow at rest, reduced venous and arteriolar responses, and increased capillary permeability, resulting in oedema development, decreased transcutaneous oxygen pressure, and increased transcutaneous carbon dioxide pressure. This phenomenon potentially hampers ulcer healing. Although the figure-of-eight method has proven to be a reliable, valid, quick, and efficient test for assessing foot and ankle measurements in patients with oedema and compromised skin integrity, it has not been studied in patients with diabetic foot. The aim of this study was to determine and compare the intra- and inter-observer variabilities of the figure-of-eight method in patients with diabetic foot. A prospective observational and cross-sectional study was undertaken, involving sixty-one subjects from a specialized Diabetic Foot Unit. Three investigators with varying levels of experience independently measured the subjects to assess both intra-observer and inter-observer variability. The evaluation was conducted using the Intraclass Correlation Coefficient (ICC). In the statistical analysis, an ICC of 0.93, adjusted using a 95% confidence interval (CI), was obtained for inter-observer reliability ICC, indicating excellent reliability among observers. Furthermore, an ICC of 0.98 with a 95% CI was obtained for the intra-observer reliability analysis, indicating excellent reliability. The results support using this test during the clinical management of oedema in patients with diabetic foot. The absence of an objective, fast, and readily available diagnostic method for oedema in diabetic foot patients in clinical practice might pose a limitation. Subsequent research should tackle this issue and explore the correlation between ankle perimeter measurements and other clinical outcomes in diabetic foot patients, including wound healing and quality of life. Full article
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