Physiotherapy Update in the Management of Musculoskeletal Pain

A special issue of Journal of Clinical Medicine (ISSN 2077-0383). This special issue belongs to the section "Anesthesiology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 1 August 2024 | Viewed by 1714

Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
Physiotherapy and Pain Research Group, University of Alcalá, Department of Physical Therapy, 28805 Alcalá de Henares, Spain
Interests: musculoskeletal pain; shoulder musculoskeletal disorders; oncology pain management; manual therapy, dry needling; therapeutic exercises; pain neuroscience education
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

According to the International Society for the Study of Pain (IASP), musculoskeletal pain is a serious problem affecting millions of people around the world, encompassing many types of pain such as neck pain, low back pain, temporomandibular pain, shoulder pain, chronic widespread pain, etc.

Although musculoskeletal pain can affect bones, tendons, muscles, nerves and ligaments, it is complex and its source is often difficult to identify.  Musculoskeletal pain is a diagnostic and therapeutic problem.

In recent years, Physiotherapy is a discipline that has developed significantly in the field of pain in an attempt to provide an adequate response to the musculoskeletal alterations proposed by patients in clinical practice.

Musculoskeletal ultrasound, manual therapy, invasive procedures and therapeutic exercise or pain education are tools that have been developed from scientific evidence for the management of musculoskeletal pain.

This special issue aims to bring together the latest advances in the assessment and treatment of musculoskeletal pain from the perspective of physiotherapy. This includes reviews, meta-analyses, original works on the assessment and treatment of musculoskeletal pain.

Prof. Dr. Daniel Pecos-Martín
Guest Editor

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Keywords

  • musculoskeletal pain
  • diagnosis
  • musculoskeletal ultrasound
  • dry needling
  • manual therapy
  • therapeutic exercise
  • pain education

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

12 pages, 660 KiB  
Article
Efficacy of Transcutaneous 4.4 MHz Radiofrequency Diathermy versus Therapeutic Ultrasound for Pain Relief and Functional Recovery in Patients with Knee Osteoarthritis: A Randomized Controlled Study
by Yookyung Jang, Lee Gyeong Je, Sunhee Lee, Donghyun Na, Hyekyung Shin, Jong Bum Choi and Jae Chul Koh
J. Clin. Med. 2023, 12(18), 6040; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm12186040 - 18 Sep 2023
Viewed by 1338
Abstract
Knee osteoarthritis (KOA) is a prevalent common cause of disability and pain among adults. Transcutaneous radiofrequency (RF) diathermy and therapeutic ultrasound (US) are commonly employed treatments for addressing musculoskeletal conditions. This study aims to evaluate and compare the clinical effectiveness of transcutaneous 4.4 [...] Read more.
Knee osteoarthritis (KOA) is a prevalent common cause of disability and pain among adults. Transcutaneous radiofrequency (RF) diathermy and therapeutic ultrasound (US) are commonly employed treatments for addressing musculoskeletal conditions. This study aims to evaluate and compare the clinical effectiveness of transcutaneous 4.4 MHz RF diathermy and therapeutic US therapy in individuals diagnosed with KOA. A total of 108 patients with KOA were randomly assigned to either the RF or US groups. Each participant underwent a series of 10 treatment sessions over four weeks and was evaluated at different time points. The assessments included physical evaluations, vital sign measurements, the Numeric Rating Scale (NRS) for pain, Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) scores, the Lequesne index, gait analysis, the 36-Item Short Form Health Survey (SF-36), and analysis of adverse responses. Both groups showed significant differences in NRS, WOMAC scores, and Lequesne index compared to baseline values at both the 10th treatment session and the one-month follow-up assessment. However, no significant disparities were observed between the two groups at each assessment point. In the gait analysis, following the 10th treatment, the RF group showed significant changes in stride length and stride velocity compared to baseline. Four weeks after the completion of treatment, both groups exhibited significant alterations in stride length and stride velocity when compared to baseline measurements. However, regarding cadence, only the RF group exhibited a significant difference compared to baseline. The findings suggest that transcutaneous 4.4 MHz RF diathermy displays a comparable effectiveness to therapeutic US in reducing pain and enhancing functional capacity among individuals with KOA. Further research endeavors are warranted to advance the efficacy of noninvasive treatments for KOA. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Physiotherapy Update in the Management of Musculoskeletal Pain)
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