Editorial Board Members’ Collection Series: Inflammatory Bowel Disease

A special issue of Journal of Clinical Medicine (ISSN 2077-0383). This special issue belongs to the section "Gastroenterology & Hepatopancreatobiliary Medicine".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 May 2024 | Viewed by 1559

Special Issue Editors

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Inflammatory Bowel Disease: looking to new horizons

Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) are characterised by active chronic inflammation in the gastrointestinal tract with huge morbidity for patients and large healthcare costs. IBD can be classified as Crohn’s disease (CD), ulcerative colitis (UC), or IBD unclassified (IBDU). Now seen as a global condition, prevalence of this incurable condition continues to increase. Whilst much is known about IBD, there remain many gaps in our understanding of the pathogenesis of IBD, variable approaches to the management of IBD, and inconsistent outcomes. This Collection Series aims to draw together articles focusing on current aspects of IBD and key aspects looming on the horizon. These might include therapeutic agents, such as the use of small molecules (JAK kinase inhibitors and S1P receptor modulators), and therapeutic approaches, such as treat-to-target or combination trials. Additional articles could focus on aspects of the pathogenesis of IBD (with regard to environmental factors, host immune responses, or the intestinal microbiome) and outcomes.

Prof. Dr. Laurent Peyrin-biroulet
Prof. Dr. Andrew Day
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • inflammatory bowel diseases
  • Crohn’s disease
  • ulcerative colitis
  • JAK kinase inhibitors
  • SIP receptor modulators
  • therapeutic approaches

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Review

16 pages, 355 KiB  
Review
Evolution of a Pathogenic Microbiome
by Pui Yin Wong, Carmen Yip, Daniel A. Lemberg, Andrew S. Day and Steven T. Leach
J. Clin. Med. 2023, 12(22), 7184; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm12227184 - 20 Nov 2023
Viewed by 1083
Abstract
The process of microbiome development arguably begins before birth. Vertical transmission of bacteria from the mother to the infant is a keystone event in microbiome development. Subsequent to birth, the developing microbiome is vulnerable to influence from a wide range of factors. Additionally, [...] Read more.
The process of microbiome development arguably begins before birth. Vertical transmission of bacteria from the mother to the infant is a keystone event in microbiome development. Subsequent to birth, the developing microbiome is vulnerable to influence from a wide range of factors. Additionally, the microbiome can influence the health and development of the host infant. This intricate interaction of the gastrointestinal microbiome and the host has been described as both symbiotic and dysbiotic. Defining these terms, a symbiotic microbiome is where the microbiome and host provide mutual benefit to each other. A pathogenic microbiome, or more precisely a gastrointestinal microbiome associated with disease, is increasing described as dysbiotic. This review seeks to investigate the factors that contribute to evolving a disease-causing or ‘dysbiotic’ microbiome. This review covers the development of the gastrointestinal microbiome in infants, the interaction of the microbiome with the host, and its contribution to host immunity and investigates specific features of the gastrointestinal microbiome that are associated with disease. Full article
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