Urolithiasis: Recent Advances in Therapeutic Approaches

A special issue of Journal of Clinical Medicine (ISSN 2077-0383). This special issue belongs to the section "Nephrology & Urology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (25 September 2023) | Viewed by 2570

Special Issue Editor


E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
The First Affiliated Hospital of Guangzhou Medical University, Guangzhou, China
Interests: Kidney stones; urolithiasis; endourology; PCNL

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Urolithiasis, also known as kidney stones, is a common urologic condition. The stones form in the urinary tract, including the kidneys, ureters, bladder, and urethra. It can cause renal colic accompanied by nausea, vomiting, hematuria, urinary urgency, frequent urination, and painful urination. Over the past 10 years, its incidence and prevalence have remained high and are now increasing steadily worldwide.

Through the development and application of various advanced therapeutic approaches, the clinical efficacy of urolithiasis treatment has significantly improved. The treatment course depends on the type, size, and location of the stone. A small stone may pass through the urinary tract by itself without any treatment. Some medications can help improve the chances of passing the stone. For the larger stones, surgical treatments such as shock wave lithotripsy (SWL), ureteroscopy, and percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PCNL) may be needed.

This Special Issue aims to collate cutting-edge research on Urolithiasis. Original articles, reviews, and communications are welcome. We look forward to receiving your contributions.

Prof. Dr. Guohua Zeng
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Journal of Clinical Medicine is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • kidney stone
  • urolithiasis
  • endourology
  • PCNL
  • ureteroscopy
  • SWL
  • metabolic evaluation
  • basic research

Published Papers (3 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

12 pages, 2054 KiB  
Article
Efficacy of Robot-Assisted Ureteroureterostomy in Patients with Complex Ureteral Stricture after Ureteroscopic Lithotripsy
by Shuzo Hamamoto, Kazumi Taguchi, Kengo Kawase, Rei Unno, Masahiko Isogai, Koei Torii, Shoichiro Iwatsuki, Toshiki Etani, Taku Naiki, Atsushi Okada and Takahiro Yasui
J. Clin. Med. 2023, 12(24), 7726; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm12247726 - 16 Dec 2023
Viewed by 608
Abstract
Background: Ureteral stricture (US) postureteroscopic lithotripsy (URSL) has emerged as a severe complication with the widespread use of laser technology. Furthermore, managing a complex US is challenging. Therefore, this study evaluated the efficacy of robot-assisted ureteroureterostomy (RAUU) in addressing US post-URSL and analyzed [...] Read more.
Background: Ureteral stricture (US) postureteroscopic lithotripsy (URSL) has emerged as a severe complication with the widespread use of laser technology. Furthermore, managing a complex US is challenging. Therefore, this study evaluated the efficacy of robot-assisted ureteroureterostomy (RAUU) in addressing US post-URSL and analyzed the pathology of transected ureteral tissues to identify the risk factors for US. Methods: we conducted a prospective cohort study on patients who underwent RAUU for URSL-induced US from April 2021 to May 2023. Results: A total of 14 patients with a mean age of 49.8 years were included in this study. The mean stricture length on radiography was 22.66 ± 7.38 mm. Nine (64.2%) patients had experienced failure with previous interventions. The overall success rate was 92.9%, both clinically and radiographically, without major complications, at a mean follow-up of 12.8 months. The pathological findings revealed microcalcifications and a loss of ureteral mucosa in 57.1% and 28.6% of patients, respectively. Conclusions: The RAUU technique shows promise as a viable option for US post-URSL in appropriately selected patients despite severe pathological changes in the ureter. Therefore, the migration of microcalcifications to the site of ureteral perforation may be a significant factor contributing to US development. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Urolithiasis: Recent Advances in Therapeutic Approaches)
Show Figures

Figure 1

14 pages, 3303 KiB  
Article
Relationship between Urinary Parameters and Double-J Stent Encrustation
by Jose Luis Bauzá, Paula Calvó, Francesca Julià, Jorge Guimerà, Ana Isabel Martínez, Antonio Tienza, Antonia Costa-Bauzá, Pilar Sanchís, Félix Grases and Enrique Pieras
J. Clin. Med. 2023, 12(15), 5149; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm12155149 - 06 Aug 2023
Viewed by 1021
Abstract
(1) Background: This study aimed to determine the relationship between metabolic urine conditions and the formation, severity, and composition of encrustations in ureteral stents. (2) Methods: Ninety stone-former patients requiring a double-J stent were prospectively enrolled. We collected 24 h metabolic urine samples [...] Read more.
(1) Background: This study aimed to determine the relationship between metabolic urine conditions and the formation, severity, and composition of encrustations in ureteral stents. (2) Methods: Ninety stone-former patients requiring a double-J stent were prospectively enrolled. We collected 24 h metabolic urine samples and demographic data, including indwelling time and previous stone composition. The total deposit weight was obtained, and a macroscopic classification according to the degree of encrustation (null, low, moderate, and high) was created, allowing for intergroup comparisons. Stereoscopic and scanning electron microscopy were performed to identify the type of embedded deposits (calcium oxalate, uric acid, and infectious and non-infectious phosphates). (3) Results: In total, 70% of stents were encrusted; thereof, 42% had a moderate degree of encrustation. The most common encrustation type was calcium oxalate, but infectious phosphates were predominant in the high-encrustation group (p < 0.05). A direct correlation was observed between the purpose-built macroscopic classification and the encrustation weights (p < 0.001). Greater calciuria, uricosuria, indwelling time, and decreased diuresis were observed in stents with a higher degree of encrustation (p < 0.05). The urinary pH values were lower in patients with uric acid encrustations and higher in those with infectious phosphate encrustations (p < 0.05). When compared to non-encrusted stents, patients with calcium-oxalate-encrusted stent showed greater calciuria, phosphaturia, indwelling time, and reduced diuresis; patients with uric-acid-encrusted stent showed greater uricosuria; and patients with infectious and non-infectious phosphate encrustation showed greater urinary pH (p < 0.05). (4) Conclusions: Metabolic urine conditions play a critical role in the formation, composition, and severity of double-J stent encrustation. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Urolithiasis: Recent Advances in Therapeutic Approaches)
Show Figures

Figure 1

9 pages, 496 KiB  
Article
Urinary Calcium Is Associated with Serum Sclerostin among Stone Formers
by Fernanda Guedes Rodrigues, Milene Subtil Ormanji, Igor Gouveia Pietrobom, Ana Cristina Carvalho de Matos, Martin H. De Borst and Ita Pfeferman Heilberg
J. Clin. Med. 2023, 12(15), 5027; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm12155027 - 31 Jul 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 674
Abstract
Background: Sclerostin plays an important role in bone metabolism and adipose tissue. Animal studies suggest that sclerostin influences urinary calcium (UCa), but this relationship has not been evaluated in stone formers (SFs). We aimed to investigate the association of UCa with serum sclerostin, [...] Read more.
Background: Sclerostin plays an important role in bone metabolism and adipose tissue. Animal studies suggest that sclerostin influences urinary calcium (UCa), but this relationship has not been evaluated in stone formers (SFs). We aimed to investigate the association of UCa with serum sclerostin, bone mineral density (BMD), and body composition among SFs. Methods: Clinical and laboratorial data were retrieved from medical records. Determinants of UCa were studied using linear regression. Results: A total of 107 SFs (35.8 ± 9.3 years, 54% male) with eGFR 99.8 ± 14.5 mL/min/1.73 were studied. Subjects were split by sex and grouped into tertiles of UCa levels. Men in the highest UCa tertile had higher body mass index (BMI) and serum sclerostin, lower lean mass, and a trend towards higher fat mass. Women in the highest tertile had higher BMI and a trend towards higher serum sclerostin. Hypertension and metabolic syndrome, but not lower BMD, were more prevalent in the highest UCa tertile for both sexes. Sclerostin was positively correlated with fat mass and inversely correlated with lean mass among men, but not among women. BMD corrected for BMI at lumbar spine was inversely associated with UCa in a univariate analysis, but only serum sclerostin, hypertension, and NaCl intake were independent determinants of UCa in the multivariate model. Conclusion: The present findings disclose that in addition to hypertension and salt intake, serum sclerostin is associated with urinary calcium in stone formers, suggesting that in addition to the hormones traditionally thought to alter calcium reabsorption in the kidney, sclerostin may play a significant additional role, warranting further investigation. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Urolithiasis: Recent Advances in Therapeutic Approaches)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop