Lumbar Spine Surgery: Causes, Complications, and Management 2nd Edition

A special issue of Journal of Clinical Medicine (ISSN 2077-0383). This special issue belongs to the section "Orthopedics".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (29 March 2024) | Viewed by 2467

Special Issue Editors

Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toyama, Toyama 930-0194, Japan
Interests: intervertebral disc; spinal deformity; degenerative lumbar scoliosis
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Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Mie University Graduate School of Medicine, Mie 514-8507, Japan
Interests: adult spinal deformity; lateral lumbar interbody fusion (LLIF); minimally invasive spinal treatment (MIST); degenerative disc diseases; intervertebral disc therapy
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Guest Editor
Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka 565-0871, Japan
Interests: spinal cord; spinal fusion; spine; cervical spine; bone regeneration
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Guest Editor
Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Faculty of Medicine, University of Yamanashi, Yamanashi 409-3898, Japan
Interests: spine surgery; minimally invasive spine surgery
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues

The lumbar spine plays a very important role for humans, who walk on two legs, such as acquiring spinal support, protecting cauda equina nerves, and maintaining mobility. Lumbar spinal diseases are common and lead to substantial morbidity as well as a loss of productivity in society. Despite progress in the investigation of the causes of lumbar spinal disease, it is still unclear. We feel the need to go one step further from past research. Further research would be desirable to establish breakthrough discoveries and treatments for lumbar spinal disorders. Firstly, we would like to expect many reports from various fields, such as image analysis research using AI (artificial intelligence), tractgraphy, CT/MRI fusion imaging, and whole-body bone X-rays. Next, we are looking forward to submissions on surgeries using new techniques, minimally invasive surgery, robotic surgeries, and treatment methods for rare lumbar spinal diseases, which have been developed in recent years. Studies to prevent postoperative complications in the lumbar spine are also recommended.

In this Special Issue, we invite submissions that focus on basic analyses of lumbar spinal diseases, lumbar scoliosis, the treatment of intervertebral disc diseases, various image analyses, the strategy of lumbar spine surgery, the management of complications, and minimum invasive surgery. Submissions can be in the form of literature reviews providing insights into current knowledge and technical know-how, as well as original research that addresses key questions in spine care. Spinal diseases are diverse in their presentation, treatment, and outcomes; thus, any submission relating to spinal diseases will be considered.

We look forward to receiving your submission.

Dr. Shoji Seki
Dr. Koji Akeda
Dr. Takashi Kaito
Dr. Tetsuro Ohba
Guest Editors

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Keywords

  • minimum invasive lumbar surgery
  • lumbar scoliosis
  • lumbar disc herniation
  • treatment of intervertebral disc diseases
  • minimum invasive surgery
  • fusion or decompression
  • management of complications
  • computer-assisted lumbar spinal surgery

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

11 pages, 1026 KiB  
Article
Evaluation of the Fusion Rate and Safety of Escherichia coli-Derived rhBMP-2 in Transforaminal Lumbar Interbody Fusion for Patients with Degenerative Lumbar Disease: A Prospective, Multicenter, Single-Arm Trial
by Ji-Won Kwon, Jae Hwan Cho, Jong Beom Lee and Jae Hong Kim
J. Clin. Med. 2024, 13(6), 1733; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm13061733 - 17 Mar 2024
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Abstract
Background: Few studies have documented the viability of E. coli-derived recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 (rhBMP-2) in transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF). This study aimed to assess the safety and fusion rate of rhBMP-2 in TLIF. Methods: The study was conducted as [...] Read more.
Background: Few studies have documented the viability of E. coli-derived recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 (rhBMP-2) in transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF). This study aimed to assess the safety and fusion rate of rhBMP-2 in TLIF. Methods: The study was conducted as a prospective, multicenter, single-arm trial, and 30 patients needing one- or two-level TLIF were enrolled. Fusion rate was assessed using the 12-month interbody fusion rate on CT. Postoperative problems, including seroma, radiculitis, and ectopic bone formation, which have been documented as risks associated with rhBMP-2 in prior studies, were recorded. Results: The study demonstrated fusion outcomes in all instances at 52 and 104 weeks post-surgery. Significant improvements were observed in clinical outcomes, with ODI, SF-36, and VAS scores, all achieving statistical significance (p < 0.0001). No perioperative adverse events requiring reoperation were reported, and there were no incidences of seroma, radiculitis, cage migration, grafted bone extrusion, postoperative neurologic deficit, or deep wound infection. Conclusions: The study demonstrates the high safety and efficacy in inducing bone fusion of E. coli-derived rhBMP-2 in TLIF, with a notable absence of adverse postoperative complications. Trial registration: This study protocol was registered at Korea Clinical Research Information Service (number identifier: KCT0004738) on July 2020. Full article
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12 pages, 3640 KiB  
Article
Quantitative Analysis of Lumbar Disc Bulging in Patients with Lumbar Spinal Stenosis: Implication for Surgical Outcomes of Decompression Surgery
by Koji Akeda, Takahiro Hasegawa, Yusuke Togo, Kento Watanabe, Koki Kawaguchi, Junichi Yamada, Norihiko Takegami, Tatsuhiko Fujiwara and Akihiro Sudo
J. Clin. Med. 2023, 12(19), 6172; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm12196172 - 24 Sep 2023
Viewed by 896
Abstract
This study aimed to quantitatively assess disc bulging using computed tomography (CT) in patients with lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS) and to examine whether disc bulging affects the surgical outcomes of patients with LSS after posterior decompression surgery. Sixty-three patients who underwent posterior decompression [...] Read more.
This study aimed to quantitatively assess disc bulging using computed tomography (CT) in patients with lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS) and to examine whether disc bulging affects the surgical outcomes of patients with LSS after posterior decompression surgery. Sixty-three patients who underwent posterior decompression surgery for LSS were included. The extent of disc bulging was evaluated as the percentage of the extended area of the disc against the endplate area (%EAD) on axial CT images. The participants completed the following clinical outcome assessments (COAs) preoperatively and 12 months postoperatively: the JOA Back Pain Evaluation Questionnaire (JOABPEQ), Oswestry Disability Index (ODI), and Roland–Morris Disability Questionnaire (RDQ). The mean %EAD of 315 intervertebral discs was 18.9 ± 8.0. The %EAD was highest at L4/L5, followed by L3/L4, L2/L3, L1/L2, and L5/S1. The %EAD of the surgical level showed no significant correlation with all the preoperative COAs, but it had significant correlation with lumbar function, walking ability, social function domains of the JOABPEQ, ODI score, and RDQ score 12 months postoperatively. %EAD was significantly associated with the postoperative score in the walking ability domain of the JOABPEQ. %EAD affects postoperative clinical outcomes, including low back pain-related quality of life after decompression surgery. Full article
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