Synthesis and Application of Luminescent Materials

A special issue of Inorganics (ISSN 2304-6740). This special issue belongs to the section "Inorganic Materials".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 20 September 2024 | Viewed by 5412

Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
1. Key Laboratory for Advanced Materials, Shanghai Key Laboratory of Functional Materials Chemistry, Frontiers Science Center for Materiobiology and Dynamic Chemistry, School of Chemistry and Molecular Engineering, East China University of Science and Technology, Shanghai 200237, China
2. School of Science and Engineering, Shenzhen Institute of Aggregate Science and Technology, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shenzhen 2001 Longxiang Boulevard, Longgang District, Shenzhen 518172, China
Interests: the design of luminescent materials including fluorescent and phosphorescent materials and their applications in chemical sensing, biological analysis, catalysis, and light emitting devices

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Luminescent materials including fluorescent and phosphorescent materials have generated significant interest and have been thoroughly studied in a variety of fields, including light-emitting diodes, cellular imaging, chemo/biosensing and photodetectors. This Special Issue will provide a collection of the latest research activities in the field of luminescent materials such as carbon dots, aggregation-induced emission luminogens, quantum dots, room-temperature phosphorescence materials, and nanoclusters. We focus on the development of new preparation strategies of luminescent materials with a controlled structure and the current development of luminescent materials in chemo/biosensing, imaging, light-emitting diodes, cancer therapy, and information encryption, etc. Moreover, the investigation of the optical mechanism of luminescent materials is also of interest.

In this Special Issue, original research articles and reviews are welcome. Research areas may include (but are not limited to) the following:

  • The new concepts of synthesizing new type of luminescent materials;
  • The design of luminescent materials for various applications such as sensing, imaging, light-emitting diodes and anti-counterfeiting;
  • State-of-the-art technologies to improve the performance of luminescent materials;
  • Study on the optical mechanism of luminescent materials;
  • The development of luminescent materials-based devices for various applications.

I look forward to receiving your contributions.

Dr. Binbin Chen
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • luminescent materials
  • fluorescent materials
  • phosphorescent materials
  • optical mechanism
  • device design
  • chemo/biosensing
  • imaging
  • light-emitting diodes
  • anti-counterfeiting

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Research

14 pages, 3205 KiB  
Article
Lanthanide-Containing Polyoxometalate Crystallized with Bolaamphiphile Surfactants as Inorganic–Organic Hybrid Phosphors
by Rieko Ishibashi, Ruka Koike, Yoriko Suda, Tatsuhiro Kojima, Toshiyuki Sumi, Toshiyuki Misawa, Kotaro Kizu, Yosuke Okamura and Takeru Ito
Inorganics 2024, 12(6), 146; https://doi.org/10.3390/inorganics12060146 - 23 May 2024
Viewed by 317
Abstract
Lanthanide elements such as europium exhibit distinctive emissions due to the transitions of inner-shell 4f electrons. Inorganic materials containing lanthanide elements have been widely used as phosphors in conventional displays. The hybridization of lanthanide ions with organic components enables to control of the [...] Read more.
Lanthanide elements such as europium exhibit distinctive emissions due to the transitions of inner-shell 4f electrons. Inorganic materials containing lanthanide elements have been widely used as phosphors in conventional displays. The hybridization of lanthanide ions with organic components enables to control of the material’s shapes and properties and broadens the possibility of lanthanide compounds as inorganic–organic materials. Lanthanide ion-containing polyoxometalate anions (Ln-POM) are a promising category as an inorganic component to design and synthesize inorganic–organic hybrids. Several inorganic–organic Ln-POM systems have been reported by hybridizing with cationic surfactants as luminescent materials. However, single-crystalline ordering has not been achieved in most cases. Here, we report syntheses and structures of inorganic–organic hybrid crystals of lanthanide-based POM and bolaamphiphile surfactants with two hydrophilic heads in one molecule. An emissive decatungstoeuropate ([EuW10O36]9−, EuW10) anion was employed as a lanthanide source. The bolaamphiphile counterparts are 1,8-octamethylenediammonium ([H3N(CH2)8NH3]2+, C8N2) and 1,10-decamethylenediammonium ([H3N(CH2)10NH3]2+, C10N2). Both hybrid crystals of C8N2-EuW10 and C10N2-EuW10 were successfully obtained as single crystals, and their crystal structures were unambiguously determined using X-ray diffraction measurements. The photoluminescence properties of C8N2-EuW10 and C10N2-EuW10 were investigated by means of steady-state and time-resolved spectroscopy. The characteristic emission derived from the EuW10 anion was retained after the hybridization process. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Synthesis and Application of Luminescent Materials)
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16 pages, 3280 KiB  
Article
Synthesis, Spectroscopic Characterization, and Photophysical Studies of Heteroleptic Silver Complexes Bearing 2,9-Bis(styryl)-1,10-phenanthroline Ligands and Bis[(2-diphenylphosphino)phenyl] Ether
by Dimitrios Glykos, Athanassios C. Tsipis, John C. Plakatouras and Gerasimos Malandrinos
Inorganics 2024, 12(5), 131; https://doi.org/10.3390/inorganics12050131 - 2 May 2024
Viewed by 534
Abstract
Three new heteroleptic Ag(I) complexes, labeled as [AgL(POP)]BF4 (13), were successfully synthesized and comprehensively characterized. Here, L represents 2,9-bis((E)-4-methoxystyryl)-1,10-phenanthroline (L1), 2,9-bis((E)-4-methylthiostyryl) -1,10-phenanthroline (L2), and 2,9-bis((E)-4-diethylaminostyryl)-1,10-phenanthroline (L3), while POP stands for Bis[(2-diphenylphosphino)phenyl] ether. [...] Read more.
Three new heteroleptic Ag(I) complexes, labeled as [AgL(POP)]BF4 (13), were successfully synthesized and comprehensively characterized. Here, L represents 2,9-bis((E)-4-methoxystyryl)-1,10-phenanthroline (L1), 2,9-bis((E)-4-methylthiostyryl) -1,10-phenanthroline (L2), and 2,9-bis((E)-4-diethylaminostyryl)-1,10-phenanthroline (L3), while POP stands for Bis[(2-diphenylphosphino)phenyl] ether. The stability of these compounds in solution was confirmed through multinuclear 1D (1H, 13C, 31P) and 2D NMR (COSY, NOESY, HMBC, HSQC) spectroscopies. Additionally, their molecular structure was elucidated via X-ray crystallography. The photophysical properties of the complexes were assessed both in the solid state and in solution (dichloromethane). Compounds 13 demonstrated moderate emissions in solution, with quantum yields ranging from 11–23%. Interestingly, their solid-state luminescent behavior differed. Large bathochromic shifts (42–75 nm) of the emission maxima and a decrease in quantum yields (2.5–9.5%) were evident, possibly due to the presence of excimers. Compound 3 stands out as a rare example of an Ag(I) red-color emitter. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Synthesis and Application of Luminescent Materials)
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12 pages, 2960 KiB  
Article
Quantum Yield Enhancement of Carbon Quantum Dots Using Chemical-Free Precursors for Sensing Cr (VI) Ions
by Karthiga Anpalagan, Hong Yin, Ivan Cole, Tian Zhang and Daniel T. H. Lai
Inorganics 2024, 12(4), 96; https://doi.org/10.3390/inorganics12040096 - 28 Mar 2024
Viewed by 845
Abstract
Quantum yield illustrates the efficiency that a fluorophore converts the excitation light into fluorescence emission. The quantum yield of carbon quantum dots (CQDs) can be altered via precursors, fabrication conditions, chemical doping, and surface modifications. In this study, CQDs were first fabricated from [...] Read more.
Quantum yield illustrates the efficiency that a fluorophore converts the excitation light into fluorescence emission. The quantum yield of carbon quantum dots (CQDs) can be altered via precursors, fabrication conditions, chemical doping, and surface modifications. In this study, CQDs were first fabricated from whole-meal bread using a chemical-free hydrothermal route, and a low quantum yield (0.81%) was obtained. The combination of whole-meal bread, soybean flour, and lemon juice generated CQDs with almost four folds of enhancement in quantum yield. Detailed characterization suggested that these CQDs were subjected to more complete hydrothermal reactions and had zwitterionic surfaces. The CQDs could selectively detect Cr (VI) ions with a limit of detection (LOD) of 8 ppm. This study shows that the enhancement of the quantum yield of CQDs does not need chemicals, and it is achievable with food precursors. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Synthesis and Application of Luminescent Materials)
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11 pages, 2461 KiB  
Article
The Effect of Organic Spacer Cations with Different Chain Lengths on Quasi-Two-Dimensional Perovskite Properties
by Lei Zhang, Mingze Xia, Yuan Zhang, Li Song, Xiwei Guo, Yong Zhang, Yulei Wang and Yuanqin Xia
Inorganics 2024, 12(1), 12; https://doi.org/10.3390/inorganics12010012 - 27 Dec 2023
Viewed by 1466
Abstract
In the past 20 years, perovskite-related research has attracted wide attention. The related research into two-dimensional/quasi-two-dimensional perovskite has propelled the research of perovskite materials to a new height. To improve the properties of quasi-2D perovskite, improve the stability of materials, and achieve specific [...] Read more.
In the past 20 years, perovskite-related research has attracted wide attention. The related research into two-dimensional/quasi-two-dimensional perovskite has propelled the research of perovskite materials to a new height. To improve the properties of quasi-2D perovskite, improve the stability of materials, and achieve specific functions, using different types, volumes, and lengths of organic spacers is an essential method. In this paper, quasi-2D perovskites with EDA (ethylene diammonium), PDA (1,3-propanediammonium), and BDA (1,4-butanediammonium) (m = 2–4) as organic spacers were prepared, and the effects of different organic spacers on the 2D perovskite were investigated. The results show that the length of the organic spacer significantly impacts the perovskite’s properties. A shorter organic spacer can effectively reduce the quantum confinement and dielectric confinement in perovskite. It should be noted that if the organic spacer is too short, the stability of the quasi-2D perovskite will be greatly reduced. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Synthesis and Application of Luminescent Materials)
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10 pages, 4195 KiB  
Article
Dual-Exciting Central Carbon Nanoclusters for the Dual-Channel Detection of Hemin
by Ya-Ting Gao, Shuai Chang, Bin-Bin Chen and Da-Wei Li
Inorganics 2023, 11(6), 226; https://doi.org/10.3390/inorganics11060226 - 25 May 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1193
Abstract
Constructing optical nanoprobes with superior performance is highly desirable for sensitive and accurate assays. Herein, we develop a facile room-temperature strategy for the fabrication of green emissive carbon nanoclusters (CNCs) with dual-exciting centers for the dual-channel sensing of hemin. The formation of the [...] Read more.
Constructing optical nanoprobes with superior performance is highly desirable for sensitive and accurate assays. Herein, we develop a facile room-temperature strategy for the fabrication of green emissive carbon nanoclusters (CNCs) with dual-exciting centers for the dual-channel sensing of hemin. The formation of the CNCs is attributed to the crosslinking polymerization of the precursors driven by the Schiff base reaction between ethylenediamine and 2,3-dichloro-5,6-dicyano-1,4-benzoquinone. Most importantly, the proposed CNCs have a unique excitation-independent green emission (518 nm) with two excitation centers at 260 nm (channel 1) and 410 nm (channel 2). The dual-exciting central emission can serve as dual-channel fluorescence (FL) signals for highly sensitive and reliable detection of hemin based on the inner filter effect. Because of the great spectral overlap difference between the absorption spectrum of hemin and the excitation lights of the CNCs in the two channels, hemin has a different quenching effect on FL emission from different channels. The dual-channel signals of the CNCs can detect hemin in the range of 0.075–10 μM (channel 1) and 0.25–10 μM (channel 2), respectively. These findings not only offer new guidance for the facile synthesis of dual-exciting central CNCs but also establish a reliable sensing platform for the analysis of hemin in complex matrixes. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Synthesis and Application of Luminescent Materials)
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