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Interprofessional Education in Pharmacogenomics, Public Health and Healthcare Delivery

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Health Care Sciences & Services".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 April 2024 | Viewed by 3121

Special Issue Editors

Department of Pharmaceutical, Social and Administrative Sciences, McWhorter School of Pharmacy, Samford University, Birmingham, AL 35229, USA
Interests: pharmacogenomics; pharmacokinetics; genetic epidemiology; health disparity; prostate cancer; breast cancer; interprofessional education
Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, School of Pharmacy and Health Sciences, Fairleigh Dickinson University, Florham Park, NJ 07932, USA
Interests: pharmacogenomics; pharmacokinetics; interprofessional education; team dynamics; substance use disorders; clinical pharmacogenomics implementation

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Within public health and individualized or precision medicine, there remains a knowledge deficit for pharmacists as well as other healthcare professionals in pharmacogenomics and its clinical applications. Interprofessional education (IPE) is defined by the World Health Organization as “when students from two or more professions learn about, from, and with each other to enable effective collaboration and improve health outcomes.” IPE is an important aspect in current health education and is necessary to train our students for the collaborative practice environment. Interprofessional research and educational experiences focused on collaborative approaches to the teaching and delivery of individualized medicine would work towards narrowing the knowledge gap and improve patient care.

The purpose of this special issue of IJPREH is to collect and publish thoughtful and well-written manuscripts on topics including but not limited to pharmaceutical research and interprofessional education and practice, particularly related to pharmacogenomics. All submitted manuscripts will go through a rigorous peer review process.

Dr. Cheryl D. Cropp
Dr. Otito Frances Iwuchukwu
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2500 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • interprofessional education
  • pharmaceutical education
  • health sciences education
  • health disparities
  • pharmacogenomics
  • pharmacokinetics
  • simulation
  • asynchronous learning
  • virtual learning
  • student feedback

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

14 pages, 711 KiB  
Article
Integrated-Based Curriculum of Pharmaceutical Dosage Forms (ICPDF): What Factors Affect the Learning Outcome Attainment?
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2023, 20(5), 4272; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph20054272 - 28 Feb 2023
Viewed by 1074
Abstract
This study aimed to evaluate pharmacy students’ perceptions regarding the correlations among the quality of faculty members, institutional resources, an integrated-based curriculum of pharmaceutical dosage forms (ICPDF), and learning outcome attainment. The current study participants have attended courses (semesters 2 to 6) through [...] Read more.
This study aimed to evaluate pharmacy students’ perceptions regarding the correlations among the quality of faculty members, institutional resources, an integrated-based curriculum of pharmaceutical dosage forms (ICPDF), and learning outcome attainment. The current study participants have attended courses (semesters 2 to 6) through the ICPDF in the Department of Pharmaceutics and Pharmaceutical Technology, Faculty of Pharmacy, Universitas Padjadjaran, Indonesia. We distributed survey instruments to 212 pharmacy undergraduate students after one year of the curriculum implementation. We asked the students to fill in the instrument in which the indicators consist of a 7-point Likert scale. The data were analyzed using SmartPLS, which included measurement and structural models through PLS-SEM. The findings informed that the quality of faculty members and institutional resources significantly predict ICPDF. Similarly, ICPDF plays a significant role in affecting learning outcome attainment. The quality of faculty members and institutional resources were not related to learning outcome attainment. Significances of differences were informed among students’ years in university regarding learning outcome attainment and ICPDF. However, insignificant differences emerged based on gender. The findings demonstrate the benefits of using the PLS-SEM approach to create a valid and reliable model, assessing the correlations between independent variables with the ICPDF and learning outcome attainment as two dependent variables. Full article
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12 pages, 868 KiB  
Article
Pharmacists’ Knowledge, and Insights in Implementing Pharmacogenomics in Saudi Arabia
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19(16), 10073; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph191610073 - 15 Aug 2022
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1466
Abstract
Background: Pharmacogenomics (PGx) and personalized medicine embrace the potential to optimize drug treatment and improve the patient’s quality of life. Pharmacists’ roles include contributing to genetic testing, patient counseling, and pharmacotherapies selection for superior treatment outcomes. The aim of this study is to [...] Read more.
Background: Pharmacogenomics (PGx) and personalized medicine embrace the potential to optimize drug treatment and improve the patient’s quality of life. Pharmacists’ roles include contributing to genetic testing, patient counseling, and pharmacotherapies selection for superior treatment outcomes. The aim of this study is to assess the pharmacists’ knowledge, insight, and self-confidence toward PGx testing, identify their future preferred education patterns, and determine the barriers to pharmacogenomic testing implementation. Method: A cross-sectional study was conducted using a previously validated questionnaire among pharmacists working in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (KSA). The questionnaire was designed in seven major categories, consisting of 26 questions. Results: A total of 671 pharmacists participated in this survey. As for knowledge, only 29.8% of pharmacists had good knowledge regarding PGx, while 42.9% had poor knowledge levels. Respectable PGx knowledge was significantly higher among outpatient dispensing pharmacists (33.6%; p = 0.049) and among pharmacists who had completed PGx testing-related training or education (40.3%; p = 0.001). Considering perception, it was positive among 50% of pharmacists and negative among 19.8%. With regard to self-confidence, it was high among 39.2% of male pharmacists (p = 0.042), among 43% of clinical pharmacists (p = 0.006), and among 44.8% of pharmacists who had extra credentials (p = 0.001). The utmost favored continuing-education learning approaches were workshops or seminars. The barriers to the implementation of PGx testing included a lack of testing devices, clinical guidelines, training or education, and personnel. Conclusion: The present study revealed that pharmacists in KSA had inadequate knowledge and understanding of PGx. Nevertheless, the majority established that PGx is a valuable tool for augmenting drug efficacy and safety. Full article
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