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Recent Advances in Herbicide Applications

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Environmental Science and Engineering".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (28 February 2019) | Viewed by 10080

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Faculty of Chemical Technology, Poznan University of Technology, Berdychowo 4, 60-965 Poznań, Poland
Interests: environmental microbiology; biodegradation of hydrocarbons, (bio)surfactants, herbicides and pharmaceuticals in aqueous and terrestrial environments; mechanisms of microbial adaptation to xenobiotics; environmental impact of ionic liquids
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E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Faculty of Chemical Technology, Poznan University of Technology, Berdychowo 4, 60-965 Poznań, Poland
Interests: environmental impact of organic compounds; biodegradation of emulsified systems; treatment of industrial pollutants; production and application of biosurfactants
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

As Guest Editor, it is my pleasure to invite you to participate in the upcoming Special Issue of the International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (IF = 2.101) entitled “Recent Advances in Herbicide Applications”.

The aim of this Special Issue is to provide up-to-date research and recent advances in environmental aspects associated with the use of herbicides, including:

  • Assessment of herbicide toxicity,
  • Development of methods for monitoring of herbicides,
  • Strategies employed for effective (bio)removal of herbicides from aqueous and terrestrial environments,
  • Accumulation of herbicides in (a)biotic elements of the environment,
  • Investigation of “key players” participating in the biodegradation of herbicides,
  • Tools for analysis of shifts in community dynamics in the presence of herbicides,
  • Risk and impact assessment of novel herbicidal agents, e.g., herbicidal ionic liquids.

Herbicides are a fundamental component of current agricultural practice. However, depending on their chemical structure, herbicides exhibit toxic effects towards soil organisms. Further, they can be resistant to biodegradation process or undergo biotransformation, which may lead to the formation of more toxic metabolites which may be accumulated in the components of our food chain and pose threat to human health. Environmental fate herbicides may depend on environmental conditions. Thus, there is a need for experimental and model evaluation of environmental fate and behaviour of herbicides, including their life cycle performance, in order to reduce of negative impact on the environment of current herbicides and find more environmentally benign alternatives.

Dr. Łukasz Chrzanowski
Dr. Łukasz Ławniczak
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2500 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • accumulation
  • analytical methods
  • bioremedation
  • degradation
  • herbicides
  • herbicidal ionic liquids
  • toxicity

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

15 pages, 2209 KiB  
Article
The Toxic Effect of Herbicidal Ionic Liquids on Biogas-Producing Microbial Community
by Jakub Czarny, Agnieszka Piotrowska-Cyplik, Andrzej Lewicki, Agnieszka Zgoła-Grześkowiak, Łukasz Wolko, Natalia Galant, Anna Syguda and Paweł Cyplik
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(6), 916; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16060916 - 14 Mar 2019
Cited by 7 | Viewed by 2653
Abstract
The aim of the study was to evaluate the effect of herbicidal ionic liquids on the population changes of microorganisms used in a batch anaerobic digester. The influence of the following ionic liquids: benzalkonium (2,4-dichlorophenoxy)acetate (BA)(2,4-D), benzalkonium (4-chloro-2-methylphenoxy)acetate (BA)(MCPA), didecyldimethylammonium (2,4-dichlorophenoxy)acetate (DDA)(2,4-D), didecyldimethylammonium [...] Read more.
The aim of the study was to evaluate the effect of herbicidal ionic liquids on the population changes of microorganisms used in a batch anaerobic digester. The influence of the following ionic liquids: benzalkonium (2,4-dichlorophenoxy)acetate (BA)(2,4-D), benzalkonium (4-chloro-2-methylphenoxy)acetate (BA)(MCPA), didecyldimethylammonium (2,4-dichlorophenoxy)acetate (DDA)(2,4-D), didecyldimethylammonium (4-chloro-2-methylphenoxy)acetate (DDA)(MCPA), as well as reference herbicides (4-chloro-2-methylphenoxy)acetic acid (MCPA) and (2,4-dichlorophenoxy)acetic acid (2,4-D) in the form of sodium salts on biogas production efficiency was investigated. The effective concentration (EC50) values were determined for all tested compounds. (MCPA) was the most toxic, with an EC50 value of 38.6–41.2 mg/L. The EC50 for 2,4-D was 55.7–59.8 mg/L. The addition of the test substances resulted in changes of the population structure of the microbiota which formed the fermentation pulp. The research was based on 16S rDNA analysis with the use of the Next Generation Sequencing method and the MiSeq platform (Illumina, San Diego, CA, USA). There was a significant decrease in bacteria belonging to Firmicutes and Archaea belonging to Euryarchaeota. A significant decrease of the biodiversity of the methane fermentation microbiota was also established, which was expressed by the decrease of the operational taxonomic units (OTUs) and the value of Shannon’s entropy. In order to determine the functional potential of bacterial metapopulations based on the 16SrDNAprofile, the PICRUSt(Phylogenetic Investigation of Communities by Reconstruction of Unobserved States)tool was used, which allowed to determine the gene potency of microorganisms and their ability to biodegrade the herbicides. In the framework of the conducted analysis, no key genes related to the biodegradation of MCPA or 2,4-D were found, and the observed decrease of their content in the supernatant liquid was caused by their sorption on bacterial biomass. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recent Advances in Herbicide Applications)
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16 pages, 953 KiB  
Article
Sediment Facilitates Microbial Degradation of the Herbicides Endothall Monoamine Salt and Endothall Dipotassium Salt in an Aquatic Environment
by Md. Shahidul Islam, Trevor D. Hunt, Zhiqian Liu, Kym L. Butler and Tony M. Dugdale
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2018, 15(10), 2255; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph15102255 - 15 Oct 2018
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 2859
Abstract
Endothall dipotassium salt and monoamine salt are herbicide formulations used for controlling submerged aquatic macrophytes and algae in aquatic ecosystems. Microbial activity is the primary degradation pathway for endothall. To better understand what influences endothall degradation, we conducted a mesocosm experiment to (1) [...] Read more.
Endothall dipotassium salt and monoamine salt are herbicide formulations used for controlling submerged aquatic macrophytes and algae in aquatic ecosystems. Microbial activity is the primary degradation pathway for endothall. To better understand what influences endothall degradation, we conducted a mesocosm experiment to (1) evaluate the effects of different water and sediment sources on degradation, and (2) determine if degradation was faster in the presence of a microbial community previously exposed to endothall. Endothall residues were determined with LC-MS at intervals to 21 days after endothall application. Two endothall isomers were detected. Isomer-1 was abundant in both endothall formulations, while isomer-2 was only abundant in the monoamine endothall formulation and was more persistent. Degradation did not occur in the absence of sediment. In the presence of sediment, degradation of isomer-1 began after a lag phase of 5–11 days and was almost complete by 14 days. Onset of degradation occurred 2–4 days sooner when the microbial population was previously exposed to endothall. We provide direct evidence that the presence and characteristics of sediment are of key importance in the degradation of endothall in an aquatic environment, and that monoamine endothall has two separate isomers that have different degradation characteristics. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recent Advances in Herbicide Applications)
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10 pages, 1056 KiB  
Article
Dissipation Dynamic and Final Residues of Oxadiargyl in Paddy Fields Using High-Performance Liquid Chromatography-Tandem Mass Spectrometry Coupled with Modified QuEChERS Method
by Xile Deng, Yong Zhou, Wenna Zheng, Lianyang Bai and Xiaomao Zhou
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2018, 15(8), 1680; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph15081680 - 07 Aug 2018
Cited by 12 | Viewed by 3833
Abstract
Oxadiargyl, which binds to the protoporphyrinogen oxidase IX to exhibit herbicide activity, is mainly used in the prevention of certain perennial broadleaved and grass weeds during the preemergence of rice in paddy fields. However, oxadiargyl affects the germination and seedling growth of rice, [...] Read more.
Oxadiargyl, which binds to the protoporphyrinogen oxidase IX to exhibit herbicide activity, is mainly used in the prevention of certain perennial broadleaved and grass weeds during the preemergence of rice in paddy fields. However, oxadiargyl affects the germination and seedling growth of rice, causing damage to the plant and reducing rice yield. Hence, monitoring fate and behaviour of oxadiargyl in rice paddy fields is of great significance. A modified quick, easy, cheap, effective, rugged, and safe (QuEChERS) sample preparation method coupled with high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS/MS) was established in paddy water, paddy soil, rice straw, paddy hull, and brown rice. We validated this method for the first time in the analysis of the dissipation dynamic and residues of oxadiargyl over two years (2015–2016) at three sites in China. The average recoveries of oxadiargyl ranged from 76.0 to 98.8%, with relative standard deviations of 3.5–14.0%. The dissipation curves for paddy soil fit to a first-order kinetic equation, revealing that oxadiargyl degraded rapidly in paddy soil with half-lives (t1/2) of 4.5–7.6 days. The final oxadiargyl residues in all samples remained below the detection limit and the maximum residue limit in China (0.02 mg kg−1) and Japan (0.05 mg kg−1) during the harvesting dates and were not detected in rice straw. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recent Advances in Herbicide Applications)
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