ijerph-logo

Journal Browser

Journal Browser

5th Anniversary of Section Global Health

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Global Health".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 December 2022) | Viewed by 5496

Special Issue Editors


E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Public Health and Nursing, UiT The Arctic University of Norway, 9037 Tromso, Norway
Interests: public health; epidemiology; environmental health; reproductive health; pregnancy care; climate change
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Director of Research, Postgraduate Studies and Outreach, Malawi University of Science and Technology, P.O. Box 5196 Limbe, Malawi
Interests: genetics; epidemiology; nutrition; climate change; reproductive health

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

It is a pleasure to invite you to submit a paper to the fifth-year anniversary of the Global Health Section. Having existed for five years, the Section has rapidly developed in quality and quantity. Global health is a growing scientific discipline with many different topics involved: epidemiology, clinical research, and even basic molecular research have been accepted into the frame of global health. The ongoing pandemic has also added a new dimension, integrating basic laboratory science with the implementation of clinical studies and epidemiological studies. The frame for global health research is steadily increasing, and we are proud to invite all excellent scientists at all levels of their career to submit a paper to our planned Special Issue. We have an excellent and quick review process, with the very best reviewers involved. This has lead to a fast increase in the Section’s impact, securing the very best conditions for your paper for posterity. Therefore, you are welcome to submit your paper to this anniversary Special Issue. 

Prof. Dr. Jon Øyvind Odland
Dr. Alfred Maluwa
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2500 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Published Papers (3 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Jump to: Other

13 pages, 2203 KiB  
Article
Prevalence and Disability-Adjusted Life Year Rates of Asthma in China: Findings from the GBD Study 2019 of the G20
by Mingtao Liu, Hui Gan, Yilu Lin, Runpei Lin, Mingshan Xue, Teng Zhang, Zhangkai J. Cheng and Baoqing Sun
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19(22), 14663; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph192214663 - 08 Nov 2022
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 1638
Abstract
Background: The credible materials about the burden of asthma in China when compared to other countries in the group of twenty (G20) remain unavailable. Objectives and design: Following the popular analysis strategy used in the Global Burden of Disease Study, the age-, sex-, [...] Read more.
Background: The credible materials about the burden of asthma in China when compared to other countries in the group of twenty (G20) remain unavailable. Objectives and design: Following the popular analysis strategy used in the Global Burden of Disease Study, the age-, sex-, country-specific prevalence, and disability-adjusted life years (DALYs) of asthma in China were analyzed. Meanwhile, the comparison in trends between China and other countries in the G20 was also evaluated. Results: In 2019, asthma was the 8th leading cause of the DALYs’ burden of 369 diseases in China. From 1990 to 2019, the age-standardized prevalence and DALY rates of asthma in China decreased by 14% and 51%, respectively; further, the decline rate of DALYs was much higher than the global average (−51%: −43%). It is worth noting that the overall population age-standardized DALYs rate of asthma in China was the lowest in the G20 during 2019 (102.81, 95% UI: (72.30,147.42)/100,000). Moreover, the age-standardized asthma prevalence rate peaks in both childhood (178.14, 95% UI: (90.50, 329.01)/100,000) and the elderly (541.80, 95% UI: (397.79, 679.92)/100,000). Moreover, throughout the study, subjects in the 5 to 9 years old interval were a constant focus of our attention. Conclusions: The disease burden of asthma has varied greatly by gender and age over the past 30 years. In contrast to the increasing burden in most other G20 countries, the age-standardized prevalence rate of asthma shows a significant decreasing trend in China, however, the age-standardized DALYs rate shows a fluctuating change, and has even shown a rebound trend in recent years. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue 5th Anniversary of Section Global Health)
Show Figures

Figure 1

12 pages, 840 KiB  
Article
Emergency Craniotomy and Burr-Hole Trephination in a Low-Resource Setting: Capacity Building at a Regional Hospital in Cambodia
by Jingjing Hu, Vannara Sokh, Sophy Nguon, Yang Van Heng, Hans Husum, Roar Kloster, Jon Øyvind Odland and Shanshan Xu
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19(11), 6471; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph19116471 - 26 May 2022
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 2013
Abstract
To evaluate the teaching effect of a trauma training program in emergency cranial neurosurgery in Cambodia on surgical outcomes for patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI). We analyzed the data of TBI patients who received emergency burr-hole trephination or craniotomy from a prospective, [...] Read more.
To evaluate the teaching effect of a trauma training program in emergency cranial neurosurgery in Cambodia on surgical outcomes for patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI). We analyzed the data of TBI patients who received emergency burr-hole trephination or craniotomy from a prospective, descriptive cohort study at the Military Region 5 Hospital between January 2015 and December 2016. TBI patients who underwent emergency cranial neurosurgery were primarily young men, with acute epidural hematoma (EDH) and acute subdural hematoma (SDH) as the most common diagnoses and with long transfer delay. The incidence of favorable outcomes three months after chronic intracranial hematoma, acute SDH, acute EDH, and acute intracerebral hematoma were 96.28%, 89.2%, 93%, and 97.1%, respectively. Severe traumatic brain injury was associated with long-term unfavorable outcomes (Glasgow Outcome Scale of 1–3) (OR = 23.9, 95% CI: 3.1–184.4). Surgical outcomes at 3 months appeared acceptable. This program in emergency cranial neurosurgery was successful in the study hospital, as evidenced by the fact that the relevant surgical capacity of the regional hospital increased from zero to an acceptable level. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue 5th Anniversary of Section Global Health)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Other

Jump to: Research

8 pages, 949 KiB  
Brief Report
Decision Analytic Modeling for Global Clinical Trial Planning: A Case for HIV-Positive Patients at High Risk for Mycobacterium tuberculosis Sepsis in Uganda
by Jessica Keim-Malpass, Scott K. Heysell, Tania A. Thomas, Jennifer M. Lobo, Stellah G. Mpagama, Conrad Muzoora and Christopher C. Moore
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2023, 20(6), 5041; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph20065041 - 13 Mar 2023
Viewed by 1320
Abstract
Sepsis is a significant cause of mortality among people living with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) in sub-Saharan Africa. In the planning period prior to the start of a large multi-country clinical trial studying the efficacy of the immediate empiric addition of anti-tuberculosis therapy [...] Read more.
Sepsis is a significant cause of mortality among people living with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) in sub-Saharan Africa. In the planning period prior to the start of a large multi-country clinical trial studying the efficacy of the immediate empiric addition of anti-tuberculosis therapy to standard-of-care antibiotics for sepsis in people living with HIV, we used decision analysis to assess the costs and potential health outcome impacts of the clinical trial design based on preliminary data and epidemiological parameter estimates. The purpose of this analysis was to highlight this approach as a case example where decision analysis can estimate the cost effectiveness of a proposed clinical trial design. In this case, we estimated the impact of immediate empiric anti-tuberculosis (TB) therapy versus the diagnosis-dependent standard of care using three different TB diagnostics: urine TB-LAM, sputum Xpert-MTB/RIF, and the combination of LAM/Xpert. We constructed decision analytic models comparing the two treatment strategies for each of the three diagnostic approaches. Immediate empiric-therapy demonstrated favorable cost-effectiveness compared with all three diagnosis-dependent standard of care models. In our methodological case exemplar, the proposed randomized clinical trial intervention demonstrated the most favorable outcome within this decision simulation framework. Applying the principles of decision analysis and economic evaluation can have significant impacts on study design and clinical trial planning. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue 5th Anniversary of Section Global Health)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop