The Diagnosis, Management, and Epidemiology of Plant Diseases

A special issue of Horticulturae (ISSN 2311-7524). This special issue belongs to the section "Plant Pathology and Disease Management (PPDM)".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 March 2024 | Viewed by 3160

Special Issue Editors

Faculty of Sciences, University of Porto, Rua do Campo Alegre, 4169-007 Porto, Portugal
Interests: plant pathology; sustainable control; plant diseases epidemiology; host-microorganism interaction
COMAV, Universitat Politècnica de València, Camino de Vera s/n, 46022 Valencia, Spain
Interests: plant pathology; plant biotic stress; plant genetics; plant resistance; horticulture; plant breeding; plant-microbe interaction
International Iberian Nanotechnology Laboratory, Avenida Mestre José Veiga, 4715-330 Braga, Portugal
Interests: electrochemical sensors; potentiometry; flow analysis; liquid chromatography; agrifood and environmental analysis
CIBIO-InBIO, Universidade do Porto, Campus de Vairão, Rua Monte-Crasto, 4485-661 Vairão, Portugal
Interests: environmental microbiology; genomics; plant pathology; metagenomics; genotyping of genes

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Agrifood systems are constantly challenged by a plethora of pests and invasive plant pathogens such as viruses, fungi, nematodes, mycoplasma, and bacteria. According to the last FAO report, plant pests and diseases are responsible for up to 40% of food losses and cost approximately USD 220 billion each year in direct and indirect expenses. The rapid evolution of phytopathogens, climate change, and international trade are the main drivers of the emergence of new plant diseases worldwide, which researchers estimate will become more frequent in future decades. The fast and accurate identification of plant diseases is of paramount importance for efficient disease management and has been a common goal across the entire agrifood sector, from producers to phytosanitary agencies, to academic research. Plant pathogens are known to interact with a wide range of hosts, vectors, and reservoir organisms, making management and diagnostic efforts hard to implement. Therefore, more research should focus on the development of efficient diagnosis, monitoring, and management tools.

We are pleased to invite you to submit your most recent works to our Special Issue entitled “The Diagnosis, Management, and Epidemiology of Plant Diseases” which we intend to be an outlet for authors to share their most recent findings on the epidemiology, diagnostics, and management of plant diseases.

This Special Issue aims to present state-of-the-art research on the development of diagnostic tools for plant diseases with laboratory and or field application, monitoring tools, sustainable control measures (e.g., essential oils, antagonistic organisms, antimicrobial peptides, bacteriophages, etc.), and the ecology and epidemiology of plant diseases of any etiology.

In this Special Issue, recent original research articles, mini-reviews, and reviews are welcome. We look forward to receiving your contributions.

Dr. Rafael José Carvalho Mendes
Dr. Leandro Pereira Dias
Dr. Renato Lopes Gil
Dr. Fernando Tavares
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Horticulturae is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2200 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • plant diseases
  • sustainable management
  • effective diagnosis
  • phytophatogen dissemination
  • epidemiology
  • green compounds

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

19 pages, 5723 KiB  
Article
Biological Control Mechanisms of Bacillus cabrialesii subsp. tritici TSO2T against Fusarium languescens, the Causal Agent of Wilt in Jalapeño Peppers
Horticulturae 2023, 9(9), 964; https://doi.org/10.3390/horticulturae9090964 - 24 Aug 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1012
Abstract
Jalapeño peppers (Capsicum annuum var. Jalapeño) represent one of the most important crops in Mexico. However, many plant diseases, such as wilt caused by strains of the genus Fusarium, reduce its yield. A sustainable alternative to control diseases is the use [...] Read more.
Jalapeño peppers (Capsicum annuum var. Jalapeño) represent one of the most important crops in Mexico. However, many plant diseases, such as wilt caused by strains of the genus Fusarium, reduce its yield. A sustainable alternative to control diseases is the use of biological control agents (BCAs), for example, beneficial microorganisms such as strains of the genus Bacillus. This study aims to analyze the potential use of B. cabrialesii subsp. tritici TSO2T as a BCA and elucidate its potential modes of action against Fusarium strains causing wilt in Jalapeño peppers. For this, symptomatic samples were collected in a commercial field in the Yaqui Valley, Mexico. Six Fusarium isolates were morphologically and molecularly characterized. After pathogenicity tests, F. languescens CE2 was found to be pathogenic. In screening assays for biocontrol bacteria, strain TSO2T, which was isolated from soil in a wheat commercial field under an organic production system and preserved in the Culture Collection of Native Soil and Endophytic Microorganisms (COLMENA), had the best biocontrol effect against CE2, and its cell-free filtrate reduced mycelial growth by 30.95%. Genome mining (antiSMASH) of strain TSO2T allows us to identify gene clusters associated with biocontrol, such as fengycin, surfactin, bacillibactin, bacilysin, bacillaene, subtilosin A, and sporulation killing factor, which codify to antimicrobial metabolites and are associated with swarming motility of the studied beneficial strain. These results demonstrate the effectiveness of B. cabrialesii subsp. tritici TSO2T as a potential BCA for the control of Fusarium wilt, through competition and a complex of antifungal metabolites, which still need to be validated through metabolomic analysis. This study highlights the importance of the use of integrative genomic and bioactivity-guided methodologies in understanding biocontrol pathosystems. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Diagnosis, Management, and Epidemiology of Plant Diseases)
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11 pages, 1655 KiB  
Communication
Association of Tomato Chlorosis Virus Complicates the Management of Tomato Yellow Leaf Curl Virus in Cultivated Tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) in the Southern United States
Horticulturae 2023, 9(8), 948; https://doi.org/10.3390/horticulturae9080948 - 21 Aug 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1260
Abstract
Tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.) production in the USA has been severely impacted by the tomato yellow leaf curl virus (TYLCV). Furthermore, a complex association of whitefly-transmitted TYLCV (genus, begomovirus) and tomato chlorosis virus (ToCV, genus, crinivirus) were recently identified in tomato. Several tomato [...] Read more.
Tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.) production in the USA has been severely impacted by the tomato yellow leaf curl virus (TYLCV). Furthermore, a complex association of whitefly-transmitted TYLCV (genus, begomovirus) and tomato chlorosis virus (ToCV, genus, crinivirus) were recently identified in tomato. Several tomato cultivars were developed and commercialized with intermediate resistance (IR) against TYLCV-IL (Israel), the predominant strain of TYLCV found in Georgia, USA. TYLCV-resistant cultivars were tested in open field conditions against multiple whitefly-transmitted viruses in Georgia under natural disease pressure during the fall of 2022. The area under disease progress curve (AUDPC) over time showed a steady increase in disease severity among all cultivars. Further analysis of infected samples using high throughput sequencing (HTS) and quantitative PCR (qPCR) revealed the presence of TYLCV and ToCV in symptomatic upper and lower leaves, respectively. Moreover, the presence of both viruses in upper and lower leaves was determined. A mixed infection of both viruses, TYLCV and ToCV, resulted in severe disease development which may enhance the commercial tomato plants to break resistance and lead to decreased fruit quality and marketable yields. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Diagnosis, Management, and Epidemiology of Plant Diseases)
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