Special Issue "Seed Germination and Micropropagation of Ornamental Plants"

A special issue of Horticulturae (ISSN 2311-7524). This special issue belongs to the section "Floriculture, Nursery and Landscape, and Turf".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 December 2023 | Viewed by 16308

Special Issue Editors

Lab. of Floriculture and Landscape Architecture, Dept. of Crop Science, Agricultural University of Athens, Iera Odos 75, 11855 Athens, Greece
Interests: endemic ornamental and aromatic species; exploitation and introduction of Greek native plant species in floriculture; ornamental indoor and outdoor plants; phylogenetic study using molecular and morphological markers; plant propagation material in floriculture; salinity; seed ecophysiology; tissue culture study of species whose populations are threatened by human activity or other factors, contributing to their conservation; vegetative propagation; plant management; xeriscape plants
Department of Agriculture, University of Peloponnese, 24100 Kalamata, Greece
Interests: plant propagation, especially micropropagation of endemic and endangered trees; shrubs and perennials focused on anatomy, physiology and development problems on propagated plants; plant cultivation in greenhouses and in controlled environments, studies on biodiversity and conservation of endemic and endangered plants, studies on plant photoperiod, anatomy, and physiology; studies on ornamental plants; studies on garden design and landscape architecture
National Research Council of Italy (CNR), Institute of Biosciences and BioResources (IBBR), Corso Calatafimi, 414, I-90129 Palermo, Italy
Interests: plant propagation, micropropagation and regeneration of endemic and endangered trees, shrubs and perennials starting from several plant explant; physiology of plant development, focused especially on recalcitrance of rooting process; studies on biodiversity and conservation of endemic and endangered plants throw plant biotechnologies; somatic embryogenesis for sanitation, regeneration and propagation aim

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues

Ornamental plants are of high significance for human life and can help improve the environmental conditions in cities since ancient times. As such, they are used in interior and exterior landscaping as trees, shrubs, as well as annual and perennial species. They are also cultivated for cut flowers or as pot and foliage plants. New species from the wild have high research interest, and their introduction in the local horticulture industry is aiming to adapt to climate change. Sexual and asexual propagation are employed for their production; many native plant species have been introduced in the floriculture industry, greatly supporting biodiversity and local pollinators. Micropropagation is a tool used for in vitro conservation and research concerning the production of plant clones with desirable characteristics for crosses to improve wild species for potential horticultural use. Fruit trees as well as aromatic and medicinal plants are also very attractive and can be used as ornamentals. Additionally, xeriscapes could be enriched with new species selected for their water efficiency. The local rural landscape character could be enhanced by the use of wildflowers meadows. Research and review manuscripts focussed on seed germination and plant tissue culture techniques for ornamental plants in landscaping and floriculture fall within the scope of this Special Issue. 

Dr. Konstantinos Bertsouklis
Dr. Epaminondas Kartsonas
Dr. Angela Carra
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • artificial seeds
  • clonal propagation
  • dormancy
  • endangered species
  • in vitro propagation
  • micropropagation
  • ornamental plants
  • plant tissue culture
  • seed germination
  • somatic embryogenesis

Published Papers (12 papers)

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Research

Jump to: Review

Article
Asexual Propagation of Greek Salvia officinalis L. Populations Selected for Ornamental Use
Horticulturae 2023, 9(7), 847; https://doi.org/10.3390/horticulturae9070847 - 24 Jul 2023
Viewed by 529
Abstract
Salvia officinalis, commonly known as sage, is highly valued for its medicinal and ornamental properties. In the present work, 12 native sage populations of north-west Greece were evaluated for eight ornamental traits. Populations from the locations of Aristi, Kefalovryso and Igoumenitsa were [...] Read more.
Salvia officinalis, commonly known as sage, is highly valued for its medicinal and ornamental properties. In the present work, 12 native sage populations of north-west Greece were evaluated for eight ornamental traits. Populations from the locations of Aristi, Kefalovryso and Igoumenitsa were selected as the best performing and for their preservation and availability in the market, their asexual propagation was investigated by (a) shoot cutting and (b) in vitro techniques. Propagation by cuttings was investigated during the four seasons. Aristi exhibited the highest rooting (65%) in spring with a well-developed root system (4.7 root number and 5.0 cm length) by applying 0.5 g·L−1 Indole-3-butyric acid, potassium salt (K-IBA), established on perlite under a fog system. However, the rooting performance of Aristi spring cuttings was not affected by different substrates of peat:perlite (0:1, 1:1, 1:2 v/v) or rooting systems (mist, fog) tested. Furthermore, the in vitro propagation of the selected sage populations was investigated using shoot tips as explants. After successful disinfection, the effect of Murashige and Skoog (MS) medium in ten different combinations of Indole-3-acetic acid (IAA), 6-Benzylaminopurine (BAP) and Thidiazuron (TDZ) were tested on shoot multiplication. Aristi presented the highest number of newly formed shoots on MS9 (0.1 mg·L−1 IAA and 0.8 mg·L−1 TDZ) and MS5 (0.1 mg·L−1 IAA and 0.8 mg·L−1 BAP) (3.35 and 3.21 new shoots/explant, respectively) with the highest shoot length (2.23 cm and 3.2 cm) and unexpected spontaneous root formation (64%) at MS5. The rooting ability of Aristi microshoots was further investigated in order to enhance their response. Of the three rooting variants tested, optimal rooting formation (100%) was observed on 0.9 mg·L−1 IAA (R3) combined with successful acclimatization (100%). Aristi exceeded the other populations in both the tested propagation systems, thus holding a strong potential for its introduction in the market as a competitive ornamental variety. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Seed Germination and Micropropagation of Ornamental Plants)
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Article
The Dormancy Types and Germination Characteristics of the Seeds of Berberis koreana Palibin, an Endemic Species of Korea
Horticulturae 2023, 9(5), 547; https://doi.org/10.3390/horticulturae9050547 - 01 May 2023
Viewed by 968
Abstract
Berberis koreana Palibin is an endemic plant native to Korea. In this study, we aimed to study the seed germination of this species using a water imbibition experiment, gibberellic acid (GA3) treatment (0, 10, 100, or 1000 mg·L−1), cold [...] Read more.
Berberis koreana Palibin is an endemic plant native to Korea. In this study, we aimed to study the seed germination of this species using a water imbibition experiment, gibberellic acid (GA3) treatment (0, 10, 100, or 1000 mg·L−1), cold stratification (0, 2, 4, 8, or 12 weeks at 4 °C), move-along experiment, and phenology studies. In the water imbibition experiment, the weight of the seeds increased by more than 120% in 24 h. An analysis of the internal and external morphological characteristics of the seed revealed that the embryo was already fully grown from the fruit and did not grow thereafter. The final germination percentages for the cold stratification at 0, 2, 4, 8, and 12 weeks at 4 °C were 12 ± 3.65, 32 ± 9.09, 59 ± 1.00, 59 ± 9.59, and 71 ± 1.91%, respectively. In the move-along experiment and phenology studies, a longer low-temperature treatment period resulted in a higher germination percentage. However, the GA3 treatment had little effect on the seed germination. Our results indicate that B. koreana exhibits an intermediate physiological seed dormancy. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Seed Germination and Micropropagation of Ornamental Plants)
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Article
Mycorrhization Enhances Vegetative Growth, Leaf Gas Exchange, and Root Development of Micropropagated Philodendron bipinnatifidum Schott ex Endl. Plantlets during Acclimatization
Horticulturae 2023, 9(2), 276; https://doi.org/10.3390/horticulturae9020276 - 17 Feb 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1154
Abstract
Philodendron bipinnatifidum Schott ex Endl. is a popular ornamental plant that is normally propagated by tissue culture methods. However, the growth and acclimatization of micropropagated plants are tarrying processes. Therefore, in the present study we examined the effect of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) [...] Read more.
Philodendron bipinnatifidum Schott ex Endl. is a popular ornamental plant that is normally propagated by tissue culture methods. However, the growth and acclimatization of micropropagated plants are tarrying processes. Therefore, in the present study we examined the effect of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) Gigaspora albida and G. marginata on the success in the establishment, growth, and development of P. bipinnatifidum plantlets during the acclimatization phase. AMF plants had significantly more leaves (10.67 per plant), leaf area (75.63 cm2), plant height (14.17 cm), shoot fresh weight (3.30 g) and shoot dry weight (0.31 g), according to an analysis of growth characteristics. In comparison, non-AMF plants had lower values for these metrics. In addition, AMF plants had significantly longer main roots (23 cm), total length roots per plantlet (485.73 cm), average root diameter (4.58 mm) per plantlet, number of root tips (236) per plant, total root surface area (697.76 cm2), total root volume (79.98 cm3), roots fresh weight (1.51 g), roots dry weight (0.16 g) than non-AMF plants. AMF-treated plants showed better performance in leaf gas exchange, chlorophyll, and carotenoid content. These results emphasize the need for mycorrhization of micropropagated plants to promote vegetative growth, especially during the acclimatization stage. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Seed Germination and Micropropagation of Ornamental Plants)
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Article
Somatic Embryogenesis and Flow Cytometric Assessment of Nuclear Genetic Stability for Sansevieria spp.: An Approach for In Vitro Regeneration of Ornamental Plants
Horticulturae 2023, 9(2), 138; https://doi.org/10.3390/horticulturae9020138 - 19 Jan 2023
Viewed by 992
Abstract
Sansevieria Thunb. species are traditionally known as succulent ornamental plants worldwide. They are also cultivated for medicinal, fodder, soil conservation and fiber uses, and for their capacity to reduce environmental pollution. Sansevieria sexual propagation is limited by the lack of viable seeds, and [...] Read more.
Sansevieria Thunb. species are traditionally known as succulent ornamental plants worldwide. They are also cultivated for medicinal, fodder, soil conservation and fiber uses, and for their capacity to reduce environmental pollution. Sansevieria sexual propagation is limited by the lack of viable seeds, and reproduction is largely made via vegetative propagation by suckers or cuttings. For these reasons, genetic improvement by conventional breeding is limited. To overcome this problem and to address the increasing demand from customers for novel Sansevieria varieties, many commercial companies regularly use in vitro propagation, as is the case in the breeding process of several ornamental plants. In this paper, for the first time, we report a procedure for in vitro somatic embryogenesis and plant regeneration starting from three flower explants for seven different Sansevieria genotypes. Regeneration was attempted using stigmas/styles, anther/filament, and ovary which were cultured on a Murashige and Skoog solidified medium under three different plant growth regulator combinations. A good regeneration rate was obtained with all genotypes used under all culture conditions tested from every explant type, with percentages ranging from 0 to 73.3%. “Genetic stability” assessment of regenerated plants in respect to their mother plants was verified through flow cytometry analysis showing a high degree of uniformity, with only S. parva exhibiting a different level of DNA fluorescence among in vitro regenerated plants. This is an interesting achievement in the aim to produce true-to-type plants and new variants with desirable characteristics, both of which are desired features in ornamentals improvement. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Seed Germination and Micropropagation of Ornamental Plants)
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Article
In Vitro Propagation of the Mount Parnitha Endangered Species Sideritis raeseri subsp. Attica
Horticulturae 2022, 8(12), 1114; https://doi.org/10.3390/horticulturae8121114 - 27 Nov 2022
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 1272
Abstract
Over the past few decades, both wildfires and human-sparked fires have ravaged Mount Parnitha, destroying the mountain’s unique natural ecosystem, applying pressure to its flora, and subjecting the vulnerable populations of Sideritis raeseri subsp. attica to excessive stress. The present study aims to [...] Read more.
Over the past few decades, both wildfires and human-sparked fires have ravaged Mount Parnitha, destroying the mountain’s unique natural ecosystem, applying pressure to its flora, and subjecting the vulnerable populations of Sideritis raeseri subsp. attica to excessive stress. The present study aims to establish an efficient micropropagation method starting from in vitro-grown seedlings. The in vitro germination study carried out during the production of seedlings revealed a higher germination rate (34.0% and 37.0%, respectively) at 20.0 °C and 25.0 °C. The in vitro-derived seedlings studied were used as the starting material for the establishment of various media. Murashige and Skoog (MS) media, hormone-free and containing 0.5 mg L−1 6-benzyladenine (BA), led to the satisfactory (84.0–89.0%) establishment of plantlets. During the multiplication phase, the study used BA in conjunction with α-naphthaleneacetic acetic acid and four different cytocinins (BA; kinetin (KIN); 6-(γ-γ-dimethylallylamino) purine; zeatin) at low concentrations (0.5 mg L−1). During the second subculture, a high multiplication index (7.3 and 6.4, respectively) was found for the hormone-free MS medium and the MS medium containing KIN at 0.5 mg L−1. Hyperhydricity took place on the media supplemented with hormones. Rooting occurred on the half-strength MS medium (51.0%). After two months, the plants’ survival rate stood at 100.0%, as did their ex vitro acclimatisation rate, which also registered at 100.0%. The present results could encourage not only the introduction of S. raeseri subsp. attica into the industry of floriculture as a new ornamental plant but also its ex vitro conservation. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Seed Germination and Micropropagation of Ornamental Plants)
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Article
Chitosan Soaking Improves Seed Germination of Platycodon Grandiflorus and Enhances Its Growth, Photosynthesis, Resistance, Yield, and Quality
Horticulturae 2022, 8(10), 943; https://doi.org/10.3390/horticulturae8100943 - 14 Oct 2022
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 1246
Abstract
Platycodon grandiflorus is a medical, ornamental, and edible traditional Chinese medicine whose seed germination and plant growth are frequently restricted by dormancy and stresses. In this study, we investigated how chitosan soaking affected seed germination, growth, photosynthesis, resistance, yield, and quality of P. [...] Read more.
Platycodon grandiflorus is a medical, ornamental, and edible traditional Chinese medicine whose seed germination and plant growth are frequently restricted by dormancy and stresses. In this study, we investigated how chitosan soaking affected seed germination, growth, photosynthesis, resistance, yield, and quality of P. grandiflorus. The results indicated that chitosan soaking had a preferable enhancing effect on seed germination of P. grandiflorus, which significantly (p < 0.05) promoted its germination rate, energy, and index, as well as cotyl and radicle length. Furthermore, 0.15–0.20% chitosan soaking effectively enhanced the leaf growth, height, stem diameter, and overground part dry weight of P. grandiflorus and reliably improved their leaves’ chlorophyll, photosynthetic rate, transpiration rate, and water use efficiency. Moreover, 0.15–0.20% chitosan soaking effectively enhanced the stress resistance and adaptability of P. grandiflorus via increasing its resistance substances and triggering its defense enzyme activity. Meanwhile, 0.15–0.20% chitosan soaking effectively improved the underground part growth and medical quality of P. grandiflorus. This study highlights that chitosan can be used as a favorable, efficient, and economical candidate or promoter for enhancing seed germination of P. grandiflorus and improving its growth, photosynthesis, resistance, yield, and quality; it also highlights that 0.15–0.20% chitosan is a suitable concentration. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Seed Germination and Micropropagation of Ornamental Plants)
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Article
Effects of Brief UV-C Irradiation Treatments on Rooting Performance of Pelargonium × hortorum (L.H. Bailey) Stem Cuttings
Horticulturae 2022, 8(10), 897; https://doi.org/10.3390/horticulturae8100897 - 29 Sep 2022
Viewed by 823
Abstract
Pelargonium × hortorum (L.H. Bailey), is a South African native ornamental plant with worldwide commercial recognition used in gardens and terraces. In the present study, we evaluated the effects of low doses of UV-C irradiation on rooting performance of P. × hortorum stem [...] Read more.
Pelargonium × hortorum (L.H. Bailey), is a South African native ornamental plant with worldwide commercial recognition used in gardens and terraces. In the present study, we evaluated the effects of low doses of UV-C irradiation on rooting performance of P. × hortorum stem cuttings. We also tested the hypothesis that UV-C-induced ethylene production directly interacted with rooting process. Over a 40 d evaluation period, the ethylene production of the UV-C-treated stem cuttings was significantly increased. UV-C irradiation positively affected rooting performance. Rooting percentage was increased in the UV-C-irradiated stem cuttings by up to 17%, time to rooting was decreased by 15% (e.g., 5 d) and root weight increased by 17% compared to the nonirradiated controls. UV-C irradiation did not affect net CO2 assimilation (As), but it induced transpiration (E) on the 14, 20, 22 and 24 d of the evaluation period. Positive correlations were found between ethylene production and As, E, stomatal conductance (gs) and root weight, while a negative correlation was recorded between days to rooting and ethylene. UV-C hastened flower production of the cuttings, but it did not affect colour parameters. We suggest that low doses of UV-C may induce endogenous ethylene production, which at low levels, interact with other hormonal mechanisms to activate root development. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Seed Germination and Micropropagation of Ornamental Plants)
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Article
In Vitro Studies on Seed Germination of the Mediterranean Species Anthyllis barba-jovis to Facilitate Its Introduction into the Floriculture Industry
Horticulturae 2022, 8(10), 889; https://doi.org/10.3390/horticulturae8100889 - 29 Sep 2022
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1806
Abstract
Anthyllis barba-jovis is a salt and drought tolerant evergreen shrub, native of the western-central Mediterranean coasts, with ornamental characteristics that make it worthy to be exploited for commercial use as an ornamental and landscape plant. Therefore, the present study aimed to determine germination [...] Read more.
Anthyllis barba-jovis is a salt and drought tolerant evergreen shrub, native of the western-central Mediterranean coasts, with ornamental characteristics that make it worthy to be exploited for commercial use as an ornamental and landscape plant. Therefore, the present study aimed to determine germination as affected by seed-coat, temperature, photoperiod, and seed storage period, as a first approach to introduce the species into the floriculture industry. Seeds scarified or non-scarified, recently harvested or after storage at room temperature in the dark for 12, 24, or 36 months were placed for germination in vitro on Murashige and Skoog (MS) medium, under 16 h photoperiod (LD) or continuous darkness, at 5–35 °C, at 5 °C intervals. Seed pre-treatment by mechanical scarification with sandpaper highly promoted their germinability. Seeds germinated in all treatments at varying percentages. Photoperiod had no significant effect on germination. Cardinal temperatures for germination were defined at 35 °C and 5 °C (possibly even lower, particularly for up to 1-year-old seeds, which germinated at 30–58% at 5 °C when scarified). Temperatures from 15 to 25 °C were optimal for germination of recently harvested or 1-year-old seeds (82–98% when scarified), whereas older seeds germinated at higher percentages at 20 °C (65–97% when scarified), thus long storage affected both the range of optimal temperatures for germination and the germination percentage. Storage reduced germination mostly of non-scarified seeds. Three years after harvesting A. barba-jovis seeds germinated at high percentages (77%) at 20 °C and LD when scarified, while without scarification germination was less than 10% in all treatments. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Seed Germination and Micropropagation of Ornamental Plants)
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Communication
Effect of Parental Components and Pollination Frequency on the Setting and Germination of Chrysanthemum Seeds
Horticulturae 2022, 8(9), 827; https://doi.org/10.3390/horticulturae8090827 - 08 Sep 2022
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1708
Abstract
The chrysanthemum is one of the most economically important ornamental plants in the Asteraceae family. Unfortunately, the efficacy of breeding through the traditional crossing in this species is highly limited due to inefficient seed setting. Therefore, this study aimed to investigate the effect [...] Read more.
The chrysanthemum is one of the most economically important ornamental plants in the Asteraceae family. Unfortunately, the efficacy of breeding through the traditional crossing in this species is highly limited due to inefficient seed setting. Therefore, this study aimed to investigate the effect of parental components and crossing frequency on the set and germination of chrysanthemum seeds. For this purpose, seven chrysanthemum cultivars were used as parental components in 10 crossing combinations. The crossing was performed either once or twice a week, for three successive weeks, starting from November. Next, the obtained chrysanthemum seeds were collected, sown in pots in a greenhouse, and seedling growth was observed. The efficacy of the seed set, germination rate, and plant development was evaluated. The plants of the F1 generation were brought to flowering and evaluated phenotypically in the three successive vegetative propagation cycles. Both the arrangement of parental components and pollination frequency affected the production of seeds. More seeds were obtained if pollination was performed twice a week and if the ‘Wda’ cultivar was used as the maternal component. Approximately 50–100% of the seeds were able to germinate in the greenhouse, depending on the parental components, which also affected the developmental pace of the seedlings. Nearly all of the seedlings (80–100%) developed into properly growing plants. Out of 10 parental combinations tested, 7 produced the F1 offspring. The obtained plants varied in the shape, size, and color of their flowers. A total of eight new phenotypes were found, among which six new cultivars granted plant breeders’ rights, so far. The present research expands knowledge on how effective crossing should be performed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Seed Germination and Micropropagation of Ornamental Plants)
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Article
In Vitro Germination and Propagation of Dyckia brevifolia, An Ornamental and Endangered Bromeliad
Horticulturae 2022, 8(5), 390; https://doi.org/10.3390/horticulturae8050390 - 28 Apr 2022
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 2003
Abstract
Dyckia brevifolia is an endangered plant used for ornamental purposes. As no references to the in vitro propagation of the species exist, the present study aims at investigating the possibility of an efficient micropropagation protocol. Seeds collected from mother plants were germinated at [...] Read more.
Dyckia brevifolia is an endangered plant used for ornamental purposes. As no references to the in vitro propagation of the species exist, the present study aims at investigating the possibility of an efficient micropropagation protocol. Seeds collected from mother plants were germinated at high percentages (84–86%) at a range of 15–25 °C, without any pre-treatment, and demonstrated their highest germination speed index (191.51) at 25 °C. In vitro-grown seedlings were used as the starting material for micropropagation on solid, or liquid, MS medium, supplemented with a variety of concentrations of cytokinins (BA, KIN or 2IP). Shoots and leaves were used as starting explants. Liquid media supplemented with BA or 2IP at 1.0 mg L−1 led to high multiplication rate and 2.7, or 2.3, lateral shoots were regenerated while on 2IP a high percentage (77.5%) of rooting occurred at the same time. Rooted microshoots were acclimatised ex vitro at 100% and acclimatised plants were transplanted in pots where they grew with a survival rate of 100% after two months. The in vitro propagation protocol presented in this study could enhance the large-scale propagation use of D. brevifolia as an ornamental plant and, simultaneously, contribute to the ex-situ conservation of the species. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Seed Germination and Micropropagation of Ornamental Plants)
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Article
Thidiazuron Induced In Vitro Clonal Propagation of Lagerstroemia speciosa (L.) Pers.—An Important Avenue Tree
Horticulturae 2022, 8(5), 359; https://doi.org/10.3390/horticulturae8050359 - 20 Apr 2022
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1701
Abstract
A high throughput regeneration protocol has been developed for Lagerstroemia speciosa through node explants under the regime of various plant growth regulators (PGRs). This protocol can provide an alternative mode to seed-grown plants and minimize the cost–time of regeneration, significantly. Murashige and Skoog [...] Read more.
A high throughput regeneration protocol has been developed for Lagerstroemia speciosa through node explants under the regime of various plant growth regulators (PGRs). This protocol can provide an alternative mode to seed-grown plants and minimize the cost–time of regeneration, significantly. Murashige and Skoog (MS) medium containing various combinations of PGRs exhibited a marked stimulatory effect on morphogenesis. Of the various combinations tried, node explant pretreated with thidiazuron (TDZ; 5.0 µM) for 4 weeks and followed with transfer into MS medium containing 1.0 μM 6-benzyladenine (BA) and 0.25 μM α-naphthalene acetic acid (NAA) was reported to be the best treatment as it resulted in a maximum number of 24.5 shoots with an average shoot length of 7.1 cm per explant in 90% of cultures after 12 weeks of incubation. The in vitro-generated shoots rooted satisfactorily in the adopted ex vitro method of rooting, which saves time and cost. Among the different treatments, the greatest rooting percentage (85%) was observed in the 200 μM IBA-treated shoots, with the highest root number (8.7) and length (3.4 cm) occurring after 4 weeks. Four months after being transferred to ex vitro, some of the physiological attributes of the in vitro-propagated plants were examined and compared to the ex vitro plants. Further, analysis of the genetic integrity in tissue culture-raised plantlets along with the parental tree was accomplished through DNA-based RAPD technique. The monomorphic banding pattern obtained by the RAPD primers resulted in a high level of genetic uniformity in regenerated plants. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Seed Germination and Micropropagation of Ornamental Plants)
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Review

Jump to: Research

Review
Seed Germination within Genus Rosa: The Complexity of the Process and Influencing Factors
Horticulturae 2023, 9(8), 914; https://doi.org/10.3390/horticulturae9080914 - 10 Aug 2023
Viewed by 609
Abstract
Seed germination is a crucial stage in the life cycle of plants, and understanding the factors influencing germination is essential for successful cultivation, plant breeding, and conservation efforts. The genus Rosa, commonly known as roses, encompasses a diverse group of flowering plants [...] Read more.
Seed germination is a crucial stage in the life cycle of plants, and understanding the factors influencing germination is essential for successful cultivation, plant breeding, and conservation efforts. The genus Rosa, commonly known as roses, encompasses a diverse group of flowering plants renowned for their beauty and fragrance. Rosa germination is influenced by a variety of factors, including seed dormancy, environmental conditions, and seed treatments. Many Rosa species exhibit different types of seed dormancy, such as physical dormancy caused by hard seed coats and physiological dormancy due to internal mechanisms. Overcoming seed dormancy often requires specific treatments, including cold stratification, scarification, or chemical treatments, to promote germination. Environmental factors, including temperature, moisture, light, and substrate, play vital roles in Rosa germination. Temperatures ranging from 15 to 25 °C, moisture, and exposure to light or darkness, depending on the species, constitute suitable conditions for seed germination. Many studies have been conducted to investigate the germination requirements of different Rosa species, thereby expanding our understanding of their propagation and conservation. Additionally, advancements in techniques such as in vitro germination and molecular approaches have further enhanced our understanding of Rosa germination biology. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Seed Germination and Micropropagation of Ornamental Plants)
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Planned Papers

The below list represents only planned manuscripts. Some of these manuscripts have not been received by the Editorial Office yet. Papers submitted to MDPI journals are subject to peer-review.

 

 

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