Advances in Disease Diagnostics and Pathogen Biocontrol of Horticulture Crops

A special issue of Horticulturae (ISSN 2311-7524). This special issue belongs to the section "Plant Pathology and Disease Management (PPDM)".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 20 June 2024 | Viewed by 4258

Special Issue Editors

Facultad de Ciencias Agrotecnológicas, Universidad Autónoma de Chihuahua, Escorza 900, Col. Centro, Chihuahua 31000, Mexico
Interests: plant pathogen detection; nanobiosensors; next-generation sequencing technology; biocontrol strategies; reprogramming of plant defense; biocontrol agents; plant pathogens; emerging pathogens; quarantined pathogens
Coordination of Food Sciences, Research Center for Food and Development (CIAD), Hermosillo 83304, Sonora, Mexico
Interests: plant biotechnology; horticulture; phytochemistry; abiotic stress; plant pathology; plant biology; plant physiology; plant genomics; plant defense; plant molecular biology

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Disease diagnosis and pathogen biocontrol are among the most important agricultural issues with regard to food safety. It is so important that the UN included zero hunger as a Sustainable Development Goal in the 2030 Agenda. The process of disease diagnosis has undergone great changes due to the use of new sensitive and precise technologies that help us identify emerging diseases in crops in a short time. The purpose of this Special Issue, "Advances in Disease Diagnostics and Pathogen Biocontrol of Horticulture Crops", is to present innovative plant disease diagnostic and biocontrol studies, tools, approaches and techniques that have been successfully applied in food production. We are looking for the most innovative, precise and rapid methods and equipment for the diagnosis of phytopathogens in the laboratory and in the field. We will also accept papers that address various biocontrol mechanisms and the most promising agents for the control of phytopathogens in order to ensure the production of high-quality, nutritious foods.

Dr. Graciela Dolores Ávila-Quezada
Prof. Dr. Irasema Vargas-Arispuro
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Horticulturae is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2200 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • plant pathogen detection
  • nanobiosensors
  • new-generation sequencing technology
  • biocontrol strategies
  • reprogramming of plant defense
  • biocontrol agents
  • plant pathogens
  • emerging pathogens, quarantined pathogens

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

25 pages, 10852 KiB  
Article
Exploring the Potential Biocontrol Isolates of Trichoderma asperellum for Management of Collar Rot Disease in Tomato
Horticulturae 2023, 9(10), 1116; https://doi.org/10.3390/horticulturae9101116 - 10 Oct 2023
Viewed by 1188
Abstract
Bio-control agents are the best alternative to chemicals for the successful management of plant diseases. Among them, Trichoderma is commonly used as a biological control agent in plant disease management due to its ability to suppress soil-borne plant pathogens. In the present study, [...] Read more.
Bio-control agents are the best alternative to chemicals for the successful management of plant diseases. Among them, Trichoderma is commonly used as a biological control agent in plant disease management due to its ability to suppress soil-borne plant pathogens. In the present study, 20 Trichoderma asperellum isolates were collected from different geographical locations and confirmed using morphological characteristics and molecular phylogenetic inferences based on combined ITS and β-tubulin sequences. All twenty isolates were screened for their antagonism against the collar rot pathogen under in vitro and in planta conditions. The isolates were evaluated through dual culture and volatile methods in an in vitro study. Isolate A10 inhibited the test pathogen Agroathelia rolfsii at 94.66% in a dual culture assay and 70.95% in a volatile assay, followed by the isolates A11 and A17, which recorded 82.64% and 81.19% in dual culture assay and 63.75% and 68.27% in the volatile assay respectively. An in planta study was conducted under greenhouse conditions in tomato var. pusa ruby by pre- and post-inoculation of T. asperellum isolates in the A. rolfsii infected soil to evaluate their antagonistic potential against the disease. The A10 isolate was found effective under both pre- and post-inoculation conditions, with a disease inhibition percent of 86.17 and 80.60, respectively, followed by the isolates A11 and A17, which exhibited inhibition of 77.80% and 75.00% in pre-inoculation and 72.22% and 69.44% in post-inoculation, respectively. Further, biochemical analysis was conducted to determine the specific activity of hydrolytic enzymes produced by T. asperellum during interaction with A. rolfsii. We found that isolate A10 produces more hydrolytic enzymes with the specific activity of 174.68 IU/mg of β-1,3 glucanase, 183.48 IU/mg of β-1, 4 glucanase, 106.06 IU/mg of protease, followed by isolate A17, A11 respectively. In GC-MS analysis, we observed maximum anti-microbial volatile organic compounds from the isolate A10, including 2H-Pyran-2-one (17.39%), which was found to be most abundant, followed by dienolactone (8.43%), α-pyrone (2.19%), and harziandione (0.24%) respective retention time of 33.48, 33.85, 33.39, and 64.23 min, respectively, compared to other isolates. In the TLC assay, we observed that a greater number of bands were produced by the A10 and A17 isolates in the Hexane: Ethyl Acetate (1:1) solvent system than in the 9:1 solvent system, which represents the presence of major metabolites in the ethyl acetate extract. Full article
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13 pages, 2108 KiB  
Article
The Isolation, Identification, and Insecticidal Activities of Indigenous Entomopathogenic Nematodes (Steinernema carpocapsae) and Their Symbiotic Bacteria (Xenorhabdus nematophila) against the Larvae of Pieris brassicae
Horticulturae 2023, 9(8), 874; https://doi.org/10.3390/horticulturae9080874 - 01 Aug 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 986
Abstract
The cabbage butterfly, Pieris brassicae Linnaeus (Lepidoptera: Pieridae), is an oligophagous and invasive insect pest of various economically important cole crops. Recently, there have been reports about an increase in the incidence and damaging activities of cabbage butterflies, signifying that the existing control [...] Read more.
The cabbage butterfly, Pieris brassicae Linnaeus (Lepidoptera: Pieridae), is an oligophagous and invasive insect pest of various economically important cole crops. Recently, there have been reports about an increase in the incidence and damaging activities of cabbage butterflies, signifying that the existing control methods fail to meet the grower’s expectations. Entomopathogenic nematodes (EPNs) and their endosymbiotic bacteria have immense potential for the control of a wide range of insect pests. In this investigation, the EPN species Steinernema carpocapsae and its associated bacterial species, Xenorhabdus nematophila, were isolated and identified through morphological and molecular techniques. The laboratory bioassay experiment was performed using S. carpocapsae and X. nematophila against the 3rd instar larvae of P. brassicae (25 ± 1 °C; RH = 60%). The efficacy of EPN suspension (30, 60, 90, 120, 150 IJs/mL) and bacterial suspension (1 × 104, 2 × 104, 3 × 104, 4 × 104, and 5 × 104 CFU/mL) via contact and oral routes showed significant mortality among the larvae. Surprisingly, 100% insect mortality within 48 h was recorded in the bacterial inoculum 5 × 104 CFU/mL. However, in the case of EPNs (S. carpocapsae), 150 IJs/mL caused the highest, 92%, larval mortality rate after 96 h. The results signify that both indigenous EPNs and their associated bacteria can provide efficient control against P. brassicae larvae and could effectively contribute to IPM programs. However, further analyses are required to authenticate their effectiveness in field conditions. Full article
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23 pages, 3782 KiB  
Article
Two Bacterial Bioagents Boost Onion Response to Stromatinia cepivora and Promote Growth and Yield via Enhancing the Antioxidant Defense System and Auxin Production
Horticulturae 2023, 9(7), 780; https://doi.org/10.3390/horticulturae9070780 - 08 Jul 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 944
Abstract
White rot, caused by Stromatinia cepivora (Anamorph: Sclerotium cepivorum Berk), is a serious soil-borne disease of the onion that restricts its cultivation and production worldwide. Herein, we isolated and characterized a plant growth-promoting rhizobacterium Stenotrophomonas maltophilia from healthy onion roots and an endophytic [...] Read more.
White rot, caused by Stromatinia cepivora (Anamorph: Sclerotium cepivorum Berk), is a serious soil-borne disease of the onion that restricts its cultivation and production worldwide. Herein, we isolated and characterized a plant growth-promoting rhizobacterium Stenotrophomonas maltophilia from healthy onion roots and an endophytic bacterium Serratia liquefaciens from healthy bean leaves. Both isolates showed strong fungistatic activity against S. cepivora using the dual culture and culture filtrate methods. This effect might be due to the presence of several volatile compounds, especially menthol in both culture filtrates as shown with a GC-MS analysis. Additionally, the root drench application of cell-free culture filtrates of S. maltophilia and S. liquefaciens significantly reduced the incidence and severity of white rot disease on treated onion plants, which was associated with the activation of both enzymatic (POX and PPO) and non-enzymatic (phenolics and flavonoids) antioxidant defense machineries of S. cepivora-infected onion plants. Moreover, the culture filtrates of both bacterial bioagents remarkably enhanced the growth (as expressed by root length, plant height, and number of leaves) and yield parameters (as indicated by bulb circumference, fresh weight of the bulb, and bulb yield per plot) of treated onion plants under field conditions during two successive seasons (2020/2021 and 2021/2022). This might be because of a reduced disease severity and/or the accumulation of the main auxin, indole-3-acetic acid (IAA), and its precursor, the amino acid tryptophan. Our findings suggest that both bioagents might be utilized as eco-friendly alternative control measures to reduce the utilization of chemical fungicides entirely or partially for the safer production of onion in S. cepivora-infested soils. Full article
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