Detection and Prevention of Fungal Pathogens in Horticultural Products

A special issue of Horticulturae (ISSN 2311-7524). This special issue belongs to the section "Plant Pathology and Disease Management (PPDM)".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 16 June 2024 | Viewed by 3326

Special Issue Editor

College of Science, Gansu Agricultural University, Lanzhou 730070, China
Interests: fruits and vegetables; mycotoxins; postharvest disease
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The decay of horticultural products, including fruit, vegetables, flowers, spice plants and medicinal plants, is an important factor leading to severe postharvest product decay and huge economic losses, as well as mycotoxins contamination. Horticultural products are susceptible to pathogenic fungi during the growth and storage period. Various pathogens that adapt to the local environment can infect different horticultural products, and these can vary greatly. Therefore, the isolation and identification of pathogens causing disease in horticultural products are highly necessary to control plant disease and develop specific fungicides. In addition, chemical fungicides are the main strategy to manage disease in horticultural products; however, a series of problems, such as environmental pollution, fungicide residue, and pathogens developing resistance to fungicide, are becoming increasingly prominent.

Therefore, we encourage the submission of manuscripts on the following topics:

  • The isolation and identification of pathogenic fungi in pre-harvest or post-harvest horticultural products;
  • New diagnosis and detection technologies of pathogenic fungi in horticultural products;
  • Prevention and control methods of pathogenic fungi in horticultural products;
  • Detection and control technologies related to the pathogenic mycotoxins of horticultural products;
  • The pathogenic mechanism of pathogenic fungi on horticultural products.

Prof. Dr. Huali Xue
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Horticulturae is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2200 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • horticultural product
  • pathogenic fungi
  • isolation and identification
  • prevention
  • control

Published Papers (4 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

14 pages, 2607 KiB  
Article
Piriformospora indica Enhances Resistance to Fusarium wilt in Strawberry by Increasing the Activity of Superoxide Dismutase, Peroxidase, and Catalase, While Reducing the Content of Malondialdehyde in the Roots
Horticulturae 2024, 10(3), 240; https://doi.org/10.3390/horticulturae10030240 - 29 Feb 2024
Viewed by 227
Abstract
Strawberry Fusarium wilt, mainly caused by Fusarium oxysoporum f. sp. Fragariae (Fof), seriously threatens the yield and quality of strawberry. Piriformospora indica is an endophytic fungus that can colonise the roots of a wide range of plants, promoting plant growth and [...] Read more.
Strawberry Fusarium wilt, mainly caused by Fusarium oxysoporum f. sp. Fragariae (Fof), seriously threatens the yield and quality of strawberry. Piriformospora indica is an endophytic fungus that can colonise the roots of a wide range of plants, promoting plant growth and enhancing plant resistance. Against this background, the positive effects of P. indica on the growth of the daughter plants of ‘Benihoppe’ strawberry (Fragaria × ananassa Duch.) under Fof stress were investigated in this study. The study began by examining the inhibitory effect of P. indica on Fof growth through dual culture on agar plates. Subsequently, a symbiotic system between P. indica and strawberry plantlets was established, and the impact of P. indica on Fusarium wilt resistance and related physiological and biochemical indexes of the plantlets were evaluated. The results indicate that fungus colonization with P. indica significantly enhances the growth indices of strawberries, including plant height, petiole length, petiole diameter, and leaf area. Additionally, the activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), peroxidase (POD), and catalase (CAT) in the leaves of P. indica were increased, and the content of malondialdehyde (MDA) was decreased compared to those without colonization. Under the stress from Fof, the growth indexes of plant height, stem diameter, leaf area, petiole diameter, and root length of strawberry plants colonization with P. indica were significantly higher than those without colonization and the symptoms of wilting were relatively mild. The activities of SOD, POD, and CAT in roots and leaves of plants colonized with P. indica were significantly increased compared to those without colonization. Furthermore, the content of MDA in roots was decreased. These results suggested that P. indica could increase resistance to Fusarium wilt in strawberry by increasing the activity of antioxidant enzymes and reducing the content of MDA. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

13 pages, 1897 KiB  
Article
Chip Digital PCR (cdPCR) to Identify and Quantify Botrytis cinerea Infection in Tomatoes
Horticulturae 2024, 10(1), 91; https://doi.org/10.3390/horticulturae10010091 - 18 Jan 2024
Viewed by 687
Abstract
Botrytis cinerea is a fungal pathogen present in almost any environment, able to cause a severe postharvest disease on a wide range of crops, resulting in significant economic losses. Furthermore, B. cinerea is frequently found in plant tissues as a latent, asymptomatic infection [...] Read more.
Botrytis cinerea is a fungal pathogen present in almost any environment, able to cause a severe postharvest disease on a wide range of crops, resulting in significant economic losses. Furthermore, B. cinerea is frequently found in plant tissues as a latent, asymptomatic infection that, when stimulated by favorable alterations in the environment or the physiology of the host, can swiftly develop into a significant symptomatic infection. In greenhouses, fields, and on propagation materials, the principal strategy adopted to control infection is the use of chemical fungicides or eco-friendly alternative methods. For the optimal success of conventional and biocontrol treatments, it is crucial to monitor the disease development and the fungal infection entity. The aim of this work was to develop a fast new method based on chip digital PCR (cdPCR) to estimate the extent of the B. cinerea infection in tomatoes. To better evaluate the amount of plant infection, a duplex assay able to co-amplify both fungal and host plant DNA was fine-tuned. The cdPCR assays were applied to quantify B. cinerea in tomato seedling samples, both naturally and artificially contaminated. The developed method offers sensitive detection, reliable identification, and precise pathogen quantification. The method can be used for B. cinerea diagnostics along the tomato production chain, starting from the seeds and transplanting seedlings to plants and crop residues in open fields and greenhouses. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study directed at applying cdPCR to B. cinerea diagnosis in tomatoes. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

18 pages, 4479 KiB  
Article
Isolating, Identifying, and Analyzing the Biological Characteristics of Pathogens Causing Postharvest Disease in Fresh Radix Astragali
Horticulturae 2023, 9(9), 1019; https://doi.org/10.3390/horticulturae9091019 - 09 Sep 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 500
Abstract
Radix Astragali (RA) is the root of Astragalus membranaceus var. mongholicus (Bunge) P.K. Hsiao. In order to determine targeted and effective methods for treating mold infections in fresh RA, pathogenic fungi were isolated and identified using morphology and molecular biology techniques, and factors [...] Read more.
Radix Astragali (RA) is the root of Astragalus membranaceus var. mongholicus (Bunge) P.K. Hsiao. In order to determine targeted and effective methods for treating mold infections in fresh RA, pathogenic fungi were isolated and identified using morphology and molecular biology techniques, and factors affecting the growth of the pathogenic fungi, such as temperature, pH, light, and carbon and nitrogen sources, were analyzed. Changes in the main active ingredients of RA, such as carbohydrates, flavonoids, and saponins, were detected before and after infection with pathogenic fungi. The results showed that Penicillium polonicum, Trichothecium roseum, and Fusarium equiseti were the main pathogens causing postharvest disease in fresh RA. The optimum growth temperature for the three pathogens was 25 °C; P. polonicum was able to grow at an alkaline pH of 8–9, while T. roseum and F. equiseti grew better and had higher levels of sporulation under acidic conditions with pH values of 5–6. Different carbon and nitrogen sources had different effects on mycelium growth and sporulation. Darkness was favorable for the growth and sporulation of the three pathogens. Compared with healthy RA, the total carbohydrate, flavonoid, and saponin contents of the RA samples infected with the three fungi decreased. This study provides a theoretical basis for the scientific and precise control of RA postharvest disease during storage by targeting different pathogens and their growth conditions. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

17 pages, 4313 KiB  
Article
Reactive Oxygen Species Metabolism Modulation on the Quality of Apple Fruits Inoculated with Penicillium expansum under Different Ambient pHs
Horticulturae 2023, 9(5), 538; https://doi.org/10.3390/horticulturae9050538 - 28 Apr 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1044
Abstract
Apple blue mold is a significant postharvest disease caused by Penicillium expansum. pH modification in colonized tissues leads to the production of organic substances, the modulation of enzymes, and then increases fungal pathogenicity. This study evaluated Penicillium expansum-inoculated apple fruits’ quality [...] Read more.
Apple blue mold is a significant postharvest disease caused by Penicillium expansum. pH modification in colonized tissues leads to the production of organic substances, the modulation of enzymes, and then increases fungal pathogenicity. This study evaluated Penicillium expansum-inoculated apple fruits’ quality responding to pH treatments ranging from 2.5 to 8.5 and analyzed the reactive oxygen species (ROS) metabolism modulation in inoculated apple fruits at the same pH. The results showed that the fruit quality of the firmness, total soluble solids, and titratable acid displayed a quick loss at pHs 5.0 and 7.0, compared with 2.5 and 8.5. Similarly, higher disease incidence was observed at pHs 5.0 and 7.0. Apple fruits infected with P. expansum at pHs 2.5 and 8.5 had less content of O2•−, H2O2, and malondialdehyde (MDA); lower enzymatic activity of NADPH oxidase (NOX); and greater cell membrane integrity than those at pHs 5.0 and 7.0. The analysis of the antioxidant enzymatic activities showed upregulation of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), peroxidase (POD), ascorbate peroxidase (APX), monodehydroascorbate reductase (MDHAR), dehydroascorbate reductase (DHAR), and glutathione reductase (GR) at pHs 2.5 and 8.5 compared with those at pHs 5.0 and 7.0. Similar trends were shown in ascorbic acid and glutathione. These results support the hypothesis that inoculated apple fruits at pHs 2.5 and 8.5 improve resistance to P. expansum by modulating ROS metabolism, compared with pHs 5.0 and 7.0. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop