Cell Therapies in Hematology: Current Updates and Perspectives

A special issue of Hematology Reports (ISSN 2038-8330).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 15 May 2024 | Viewed by 1754

Special Issue Editor

Dana Farber Cancer Institute, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA
Interests: hematopoiesis; leukemia; stem cells; immune responses

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Cell therapy and transfusion medicine have been the most common treatment option for hematological problems such as sickle cell anemia, thalassemia, hemophilia and bleeding disorders. Lately, with the technological advances, once seemingly challenging stem cell transplantation is now becoming more and more approachable with a widespread applicability including, but not restricted, to the primary immune deficiencies, hemoglobinopathies and heme neoplasms. For many primary immune deficiency diseases such as Wiskott Aldrich Syndrome, and SCID, hematopoietic stem cell transplantation remains the most curative treatment option. With significant graft versus leukemia response, allogeneic stem cell transplant is now becoming a routine practice for leukemia treatment. At the same time, improved gene engineering, viral vectors, and cell manipulation techniques, have enabled engineered stem cell transplants to be a lucrative treatment strategy for primary immune deficiencies and hemoglobinopathies. Cell therapies based on engineered T cells in the form of CAR-T, TCR-T and TIL, are showing their promise in several neoplasms.   This special issue will be an update on cell therapies in hematology including recent developments, new ideas, and basic concepts, pre-clinical and clinical reports on advances and challenges in the field. We would like to invite basic and translational research manuscripts with an emphasis on cell therapies, specifically, novel vector designs, new gene therapy and bioassays for hematological problems, advanced cell preparation, transduction, and proliferation methods. Review articles covering the advances in cell therapies in benign or malignant hematological problem and chronological reports are welcome. Single case reports are also welcome if they present a sufficiently novel approach. We look forward to preparing a gripping special issue for clinicians, basic research scientists and interested audience.    

Dr. Swati Garg
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Hematology Reports is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • cell therapy
  • hematopoietic stem cell transplant
  • engineered T cells
  • hemoglobinopathies,
  • primary immune deficiencies
  • leukemia
  • bone marrow failure

Published Papers (1 paper)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Review

19 pages, 2791 KiB  
Review
Chimeric Antigen Receptor T Cell Therapy in Acute Myeloid Leukemia: Trials and Tribulations
by Swati Garg, Wei Ni, James D. Griffin and Martin Sattler
Hematol. Rep. 2023, 15(4), 608-626; https://doi.org/10.3390/hematolrep15040063 - 12 Nov 2023
Viewed by 1409
Abstract
Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a heterogeneous hematological malignancy that is often associated with relapse and drug resistance after standard chemotherapy or targeted therapy, particularly in older patients. Hematopoietic stem cell transplants are looked upon as the ultimate salvage option with curative intent. [...] Read more.
Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a heterogeneous hematological malignancy that is often associated with relapse and drug resistance after standard chemotherapy or targeted therapy, particularly in older patients. Hematopoietic stem cell transplants are looked upon as the ultimate salvage option with curative intent. Adoptive cell therapy using chimeric antigen receptors (CAR) has shown promise in B cell malignancies and is now being investigated in AML. Initial clinical trials have been disappointing in AML, and we review current strategies to improve efficacy for CAR approaches. The extensive number of clinical trials targeting different antigens likely reflects the genetic heterogeneity of AML. The limited number of patients reported in multiple early clinical studies makes it difficult to draw conclusions about CAR safety, but it does suggest that the efficacy of this approach in AML lags behind the success observed in B cell malignancies. There is a clear need not only to improve CAR design but also to identify targets in AML that show limited expression in normal myeloid lineage cells. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Cell Therapies in Hematology: Current Updates and Perspectives)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop