Advances, Caveats And Conundrums in Diabetes

A special issue of Healthcare (ISSN 2227-9032).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (15 March 2020) | Viewed by 7804

Special Issue Editor

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Diabetes—particularly type 2 (DM2)—is prevalent worldwide, with an increasing incidence. Gestational diabetes (GDM) is also quite common. Although the pharmaceutical armamentarium for DM2 has expanded, no fundamentally new categories of drugs for it have appeared in the last decade. Monitoring of glycemia has been augmented with newer apparatuses, which are usually reimbursed—though for patients with diabetes type 1 (DM1). Despite the use of current means to deal with diabetes, a substantial percentage of patients remain with a disease which is not well-controlled and suffer from its complications. In this Special Issue, authors are invited to submit original research works as well as review articles dealing with such aspects.

Dr. Ioannis Ilias
Guest Editor

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Keywords

  • Diabetes
  • Human
  • Gestational
  • Treatment
  • Complications

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

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12 pages, 274 KiB  
Article
Knowledge, Perceptions and Concerns of Diabetes-Associated Complications among Individuals Living with Type 1 and Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus
by Clara Sanz-Nogués, Mohamad Mustafa, Helen Burke, Timothy O’Brien and Cynthia M. Coleman
Healthcare 2020, 8(1), 25; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare8010025 - 30 Jan 2020
Cited by 14 | Viewed by 4195
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to investigate the knowledge, perceptions and concerns of individuals living with diabetes mellitus regarding the disorder and its associated long-term health complications. Individuals living with type 1 (N = 110) and type 2 (N = [...] Read more.
The purpose of this study was to investigate the knowledge, perceptions and concerns of individuals living with diabetes mellitus regarding the disorder and its associated long-term health complications. Individuals living with type 1 (N = 110) and type 2 (N = 100) diabetes were surveyed at the Diabetes Centre at University Hospital Galway (Ireland). A questionnaire was used to record respondent’s perceptions and concerns about living with diabetes and developing associated long-term health complications, especially diabetes-induced osteopathy. Participants’ responses revealed a variety of perspectives. Individuals with type 1 diabetes had a deeper understanding of the aetiology of diabetes and were more concerned about its complications than individuals with type 2 diabetes. The most recognized complications identified by the participants were retinopathy (92% type 1; 83% type 2), amputations (80% type 1; 70% type 2) and nephropathy (83% type 1; 63% type 2). Diabetes-related osteopathy was under-recognized, with 37% (type 1) and 23% (type 2) of respondents identifying bone fractures as a diabetes-related complication. Enhancing the patient awareness of this under-recognized diabetes-associated complication and ensuring that preventative measures are incorporated within health care programmes may offer methodologies to address this complication clinically. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances, Caveats And Conundrums in Diabetes)

Other

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9 pages, 1434 KiB  
Brief Report
“JUMPing into Diabetes Control”: A Group-Setting Self-Empowerment Lifestyle Intervention among Diabetes Patients
by Sheena Henry, Lu Shi, Virginia Alexander, Richard O’Neal, Stephen Carey, Hugh D. Spitler, Deborah Leonard, Gail Chastain, Lauren Hassan and Meenu Jindal
Healthcare 2020, 8(2), 90; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare8020090 - 7 Apr 2020
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 3173
Abstract
We examined the impact of a group-based self-empowerment intervention among diabetes patients, which uses multidisciplinary education, collaborative learning, peer support, and development of diabetes-specific social capital to improve glycemic control and weight management. Thirty-five patients who had primary care established at the Prisma [...] Read more.
We examined the impact of a group-based self-empowerment intervention among diabetes patients, which uses multidisciplinary education, collaborative learning, peer support, and development of diabetes-specific social capital to improve glycemic control and weight management. Thirty-five patients who had primary care established at the Prisma Health Upstate, Internal Medicine Resident clinic and held the diagnosis of diabetes for longer than one year were recruited for our single-arm pilot intervention. Each group intervention session involved one to two internal medicine resident physician facilitators, a clinical diabetic educator, and 5–10 patients. Each session had a framework facilitated by the resident, with most of the discussion being patient-led, aiming to provide a collaborative learning environment and create a support group atmosphere to encourage self-empowerment. Patients’ hemoglobin A1c level and body mass index (BMI) before the intervention and 3 to 6 months after completion were collected from the laboratory results obtained in the participants’ routine clinic visits. All graduates from this three-week intervention were invited to attend monthly maintenance sessions, and we tracked the HgbA1c measures of 29 JUMP graduates one year after the intervention, even though 13 of the 29 chose not to participate in the monthly maintenance sessions. The pre-intervention HgbA1c level averaged 8.84%, whereas the post-intervention HgbA1c level averaged 7.81%. A paired t test showed that this pre–post difference of 1.03 percentage points was statistically significant (p = 0.0007). For BMI, there was an average decline of 0.78 from the pre-intervention mean value of 40.56 to the post-intervention mean value of 39.78 (p = 0.03). Among the 29 participants who agreed to participate in our follow-up measure of their HgbA1c status one year after the intervention, a paired t test showed that there was no significant difference between the post-JUMP measure and the follow-up measure (p = 0.808). There was no statistically significant difference between the HgbA1c level of those participating in the maintenance program and that of those not participating (post-intervention t test of between-group difference: p = 0.271; follow-up t test of between-group difference: p = 0.457). Our single-arm, pilot study of the three-week group intervention of self-empowerment shows promising results in glycemic control and weight loss. The short duration and small number of sessions expected could make it more feasible for implementation and dissemination as compared with popular intervention protocols that require much longer periods of attendance, if the effectiveness of this patient group-based self-empowerment approach can be further established by randomized controlled studies in the future. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances, Caveats And Conundrums in Diabetes)
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