Maternal, Fetal and Neonatal Health

A special issue of Healthcare (ISSN 2227-9032). This special issue belongs to the section "Perinatal and Neonatal Medicine".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 December 2022) | Viewed by 23902

Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
Department of Neonatology, Canberra Hospital, Australian National University, Canberra, Australia
Interests: neonatal and perinatal medicine; epidemiology of prematurity; quality of care in neonatal intensive care units; neurodevelopmental outcome of premature infants; neonatal abstinence syndrome
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Healthcare (ISSN 2227-9032; Impact Factor: 2.645; https://www.mdpi.com/journal/healthcare/about) is an international, peer-reviewed, open access journal that publishes original theoretical and empirical work in the interdisciplinary area of all aspects of medicine and healthcare research.

Healthcare intends to initiate a Special Issue. Under the Section “Perinatal and Neonatal Medicine”, this Special Issue aims to collect a set of high-quality papers that highlight the most recent advances in the field of maternal, fetal and neonatal health.

This Special Issue will publish a thematic series of high-quality articles on key topics in maternal, fetal and neonatal health. It will emphasize new possibilities for perinatal and neonatal medicine, to translate research into recommendations for best practices in the real world, and to promote discussion in the perinatal and neonatal medicine community.

We kindly encourage all research groups covering relevant areas within the Section’s scope to contribute up-to-date, full-length comprehensive manuscripts, highlighting the latest developments in their research field, or to invite relevant experts and colleagues to do so.

Distinguished researchers from all over the world are invited to contribute to this Issue. Potential contributors/invited authors are kindly requested to submit a tentative title and a short abstract to our editorial office for pre-evaluation. Please note that selected full papers will still be subjected to a thorough and rigorous peer-review. All papers will be published on an ongoing basis.

Prof. Dr. Abdel-Latif Mohamed
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Healthcare is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2700 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Maternal
  • Neonate
  • Fetal
  • Infant
  • Perinatal
  • In-utero
  • Morbidity
  • Mortality
  • Neurosensory
  • Outcome
  • Intensive care
  • Special care

Published Papers (12 papers)

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Editorial

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2 pages, 186 KiB  
Editorial
Editorial for Special Issue “Maternal, Fetal and Neonatal Health”
by Mohamed E. Abdel-Latif
Healthcare 2023, 11(17), 2461; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare11172461 - 04 Sep 2023
Viewed by 653
Abstract
The maternal, foetal, and neonatal health field has witnessed remarkable advancements in recent years, driven by cutting-edge research and innovative technologies [...] Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Maternal, Fetal and Neonatal Health)

Research

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17 pages, 1883 KiB  
Article
Development and Validation of a Risk Scoring Tool for Bronchopulmonary Dysplasia in Preterm Infants Based on a Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis
by Zhumei Yu, Lili Wang, Yang Wang, Min Zhang, Yanqin Xu and Annuo Liu
Healthcare 2023, 11(5), 778; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare11050778 - 06 Mar 2023
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1748
Abstract
Background: Bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) is the most common serious pulmonary morbidity in preterm infants with high disability and mortality rates. Early identification and treatment of BPD is critical. Objective: This study aimed to develop and validate a risk scoring tool for early identification [...] Read more.
Background: Bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) is the most common serious pulmonary morbidity in preterm infants with high disability and mortality rates. Early identification and treatment of BPD is critical. Objective: This study aimed to develop and validate a risk scoring tool for early identification of preterm infants that are at high-risk for developing BPD. Methods: The derivation cohort was derived from a systematic review and meta-analysis of risk factors for BPD. The statistically significant risk factors with their corresponding odds ratios were utilized to construct a logistic regression risk prediction model. By scoring the weights of each risk factor, a risk scoring tool was established and the risk stratification was divided. External verification was carried out by a validation cohort from China. Results: Approximately 83,034 preterm infants with gestational age < 32 weeks and/or birth weight < 1500 g were screened in this meta-analysis, and the cumulative incidence of BPD was about 30.37%. The nine predictors of this model were Chorioamnionitis, Gestational age, Birth weight, Sex, Small for gestational age, 5 min Apgar score, Delivery room intubation, and Surfactant and Respiratory distress syndrome. Based on the weight of each risk factor, we translated it into a simple clinical scoring tool with a total score ranging from 0 to 64. External validation showed that the tool had good discrimination, the area under the curve was 0.907, and that the Hosmer–Lemeshow test showed a good fit (p = 0.3572). In addition, the results of the calibration curve and decision curve analysis suggested that the tool showed significant conformity and net benefit. When the optimal cut-off value was 25.5, the sensitivity and specificity were 0.897 and 0.873, respectively. The resulting risk scoring tool classified the population of preterm infants into low-risk, low-intermediate, high-intermediate, and high-risk groups. This BPD risk scoring tool is suitable for preterm infants with gestational age < 32 weeks and/or birth weight < 1500 g. Conclusions: An effective risk prediction scoring tool based on a systematic review and meta-analysis was developed and validated. This simple tool may play an important role in establishing a screening strategy for BPD in preterm infants and potentially guide early intervention. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Maternal, Fetal and Neonatal Health)
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10 pages, 1605 KiB  
Article
Mobilizing the World Café Method for Adequate Development of Non-Technical Skills of Midwives in Morocco: A Pilot Experiment
by Asmaa Ghafili, Widad Azzouzi, Meryem Hamdoune, Abdellah Gantare, Claire Lobet-Maris and Maximilien Gourdin
Healthcare 2023, 11(4), 519; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare11040519 - 09 Feb 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1074
Abstract
This article explores the development of the most critical soft skills in midwifery through the use of a participatory method called the World Café in the context of continuing education at the Formation and Simulation Center (FORSim) in Settat, Morocco. Non-technical skills include [...] Read more.
This article explores the development of the most critical soft skills in midwifery through the use of a participatory method called the World Café in the context of continuing education at the Formation and Simulation Center (FORSim) in Settat, Morocco. Non-technical skills include a set of metacognitive abilities that complement technical skills to ensure the safe execution of technical activities and the parturient’s satisfaction. In order to develop these midwifery skills through the World Café method, we invited nine midwives from two maternity units in the Casablanca-Settat region, with whom we elaborated our psychological, organizational, cognitive, and interactional (POCI) model. The study took place over a full day, structured into three distinct steps: a self-assessment of the level of mastery of the eight soft skills in the POCI model, four cycles of the World Café and, finally, a discussion of and feedback about the method. The use of the World Café method allowed for a dialogue on the possibilities of managing and addressing issues related to non-technical skills among midwives from various hospital settings. Based on the results, we found that the participants enjoyed the non-stressful atmosphere of the World Café and were very productive. The assessments and feedback from the midwives participating in this study suggest that managers can adopt the World Café approach to develop non-technical skills and enhance midwives’ interactions and soft skills as part of their continuing education. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Maternal, Fetal and Neonatal Health)
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9 pages, 576 KiB  
Article
Evaluation of Midwives’ Practises on Herpetic Infections during Pregnancy: A French Vignette-Based Study
by Adrian Mrozik, Yann Sellier, Déborah Lemaitre and Laurent Gaucher
Healthcare 2023, 11(3), 364; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare11030364 - 28 Jan 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1395
Abstract
(1) Background: One out of two pregnant women has a history of herpes infection. Initial infections have a high risk of neonatal transmission. Our objective was to analyse the professional practises of midwives regarding the management of herpes infections during pregnancy in France; [...] Read more.
(1) Background: One out of two pregnant women has a history of herpes infection. Initial infections have a high risk of neonatal transmission. Our objective was to analyse the professional practises of midwives regarding the management of herpes infections during pregnancy in France; (2) Methods: A national survey conducted via an online self-questionnaire, including clinical vignettes for which the midwives proposed a diagnosis, a drug treatment, a mode of birth, and a prognosis. These responses were used to evaluate the conformity of the responses to the guidelines, as well as the influence of certain criteria, such as mode of practise and experience; (3) Results: Of 728 responses, only 26.1% of the midwives reported being aware of the 2017 clinical practise guidelines. The midwives proposed taking the appropriate actions in 56.1% of the responses in the case of a recurrence, and in 95.1% of the responses in the case of a primary infection. For the specific, high-risk case of a nonprimary initial infection at 38 weeks of gestation, reporting knowledge of the recommendations improved the compliance of the proposed care by 40% (p = 0.02). However, 33.8% of the midwives underestimated the neonatal risk at term after a primary initial infection, and 43% underestimated the risk after a primary initial infection at term; (4) Conclusions: The majority of reported practises were compliant despite a low level of knowledge of the guidelines. The dissemination of guidelines may be important to improve information and adherence to appropriate therapeutic practise. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Maternal, Fetal and Neonatal Health)
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12 pages, 278 KiB  
Article
Physical Violence during Pregnancy and Its Implications at Birth: Analysis of a Population Survey, 2019
by Laura Virginia Periche Medrano, María Alejandra Guerrero Loarte, Fabriccio J. Visconti-Lopez, Diego Azañedo and Rodrigo Vargas-Fernández
Healthcare 2023, 11(1), 33; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare11010033 - 22 Dec 2022
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1373
Abstract
Physical partner violence is widely recognized as a global health problem, especially in pregnant women. This study determines the association between physical violence during pregnancy in Peruvian women aged 15 to 49 years with low birth weight and abortion according to the Demographic [...] Read more.
Physical partner violence is widely recognized as a global health problem, especially in pregnant women. This study determines the association between physical violence during pregnancy in Peruvian women aged 15 to 49 years with low birth weight and abortion according to the Demographic and Family Health Survey (ENDES) 2019. An analytical cross-sectional observational study was carried out based on the data from the ENDES 2019. Two dependent variables referring to birth outcomes were included: abortion and low birth weight. The independent variable was physical violence during pregnancy by her current or former husband/partner. A total of 15,305 women were included in the study. The prevalence of physical violence during pregnancy was 6.43%. Regarding the adverse outcomes of pregnancy, the prevalences of abortion and low birth weight were 20.84% and 6.01%, respectively. Women suffering physical violence during pregnancy were more likely to have an abortion but not low birth weight. In conclusion, it was found that 6 in 100 Peruvian women of childbearing age were victims of violence during pregnancy. Likewise, it was observed that women who were victims of violence during pregnancy had a higher probability of having an abortion but not low birth weight. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Maternal, Fetal and Neonatal Health)
14 pages, 3401 KiB  
Article
Vibroacoustic Study in the Neonatal Ward
by Jose Miguel Sequí-Canet, Romina del Rey-Tormos, Jesús Alba-Fernández and Gema González-Mazarías
Healthcare 2022, 10(7), 1180; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare10071180 - 24 Jun 2022
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1815
Abstract
Neonatal wards are often subject to excessive noise pollution. Noise pollution encompasses two concepts, noise and vibration; their main difference being that a noise is heard and a vibration is felt in the body. The latter is what can be transmitted within the [...] Read more.
Neonatal wards are often subject to excessive noise pollution. Noise pollution encompasses two concepts, noise and vibration; their main difference being that a noise is heard and a vibration is felt in the body. The latter is what can be transmitted within the incubators of neonatal inpatients. This fact needs to be explored in depth. This work shows the results of the diagnosis of vibrations transmitted within the incubators that could affect neonates admitted to the neonatal unit of the Francesc de Borja University Hospital (Gandía, Spain). For this purpose, the vibrations reaching the neonate head resting area were recorded, taking into account different points, scenarios, days, and time slots. It could be observed that due to the incubator’s motor position, the levels obtained in some scenarios measured in this study exceeded the regulation-specified levels. The conclusion is that the greatest influence on vibrations is the incubator’s own motor, with other possible sources of vibrations, such as the room’s air conditioning, having less influence. Further studies are needed to determine whether this vibration is harmful or beneficial to the neonate. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Maternal, Fetal and Neonatal Health)
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9 pages, 954 KiB  
Article
Perinatal Exposure to HIV Infection: The Experience of Craiova Regional Centre, Romania
by Eugenia-Andreea Marcu, Sorin-Nicolae Dinescu, Vlad Pădureanu, Florentina Dumitrescu and Radu Diaconu
Healthcare 2022, 10(2), 308; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare10020308 - 06 Feb 2022
Cited by 9 | Viewed by 1781
Abstract
Background and objectives: HIV infection in pregnant women can be responsible for a number of consequences during pregnancy, such as: maternal anaemia, miscarriage, low birth weight, and preterm birth. The objectives of this study were to determine the maternal–foetal transmission rate of HIV [...] Read more.
Background and objectives: HIV infection in pregnant women can be responsible for a number of consequences during pregnancy, such as: maternal anaemia, miscarriage, low birth weight, and preterm birth. The objectives of this study were to determine the maternal–foetal transmission rate of HIV among pregnant women living with HIV from Craiova Regional Centre in order to assess the risk factors for mother-to-child transmission of HIV and to identify the characteristics of newborns perinatally exposed to HIV. Materials and methods: A retrospective study was conducted between 1 January 2011 and 31 December 2020, including children born to HIV-positive mothers. Results: The studied group included 138 newborns and was divided into two subgroups: group A, which included 10 HIV-infected infants; and group B, which included 128 uninfected infants. The mother-to-child transmission rate was 3.5% for women to whom all prophylaxis standards were applied. We found a statistically significant correlation between the level of maternal HIV viremia and perinatal HIV transmission (p = 0.01). Preterm birth and low birth weight were associated with perinatal transmission of the infection. Conclusions: Perinatal transmission of HIV infection during our study was associated with inconsistent application of screening for HIV infection among pregnant women, lack of antiretroviral therapy, poor adherence to treatment, and detectable HIV viral load during pregnancy. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Maternal, Fetal and Neonatal Health)
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12 pages, 219 KiB  
Article
Assessment of Pregnant Women’s Satisfaction with Model of Care Initiative: Antenatal Care Service at Primary Health Care in Cluster One in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia
by Saad M. Alhaqbani and Amen A. Bawazir
Healthcare 2022, 10(1), 151; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare10010151 - 13 Jan 2022
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 2793
Abstract
The current study assessed pregnant women’s satisfaction with antenatal care (ANC) services at primary health care centers (PHCs) in Riyadh Cluster One. The study was conducted at 11 PHCs where the ANC initiative has been implemented. A total of 646 pregnant women were [...] Read more.
The current study assessed pregnant women’s satisfaction with antenatal care (ANC) services at primary health care centers (PHCs) in Riyadh Cluster One. The study was conducted at 11 PHCs where the ANC initiative has been implemented. A total of 646 pregnant women were enrolled. A questionnaire was completed by participants to measure the level of satisfaction with the provided services, care, and consultation. Subsequently, the data were analyzed to determine the significant differences and conduct regression analysis. The overall satisfaction with initial triage assessment, provided services, consultation, and examination was 93.7%, 87.8%, 71.8%, and 53.9%, respectively. Regarding ANC services, education was the only statistically significant variable that influenced patient satisfaction (p < 0.05). In contrast, satisfaction with the provided care was significantly related to all the variables studied. For consultation, education (p < 0.001) and monthly income (p < 0.05) were the statistically significant role players. In the regression analysis, secondary education was statistically significantly related to the provided services, consultation, and examination. Despite the satisfactory level of ANC at the selected PHCs, higher patient satisfaction could be achieved in the future by improving the consultation and examination practices. Overall satisfaction with the health care workers at PHCs is high. Incorporating implied ameliorations would enhance the quality of services and patient satisfaction. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Maternal, Fetal and Neonatal Health)
8 pages, 260 KiB  
Article
The Birth Plan Experience—A Pilot Qualitative Study in Southern Spain
by Raquel Alba-Rodríguez, María Pilar Coronado-Carvajal and Pedro Hidalgo-Lopezosa
Healthcare 2022, 10(1), 95; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare10010095 - 04 Jan 2022
Cited by 6 | Viewed by 3179
Abstract
Background: Healthcare systems advocate for quality care and humanized relations in routine birth care, and have therefore created the Birth Plan, a document available to pregnant women to state their preferences in relation to the birth process. Methods: This qualitative research with a [...] Read more.
Background: Healthcare systems advocate for quality care and humanized relations in routine birth care, and have therefore created the Birth Plan, a document available to pregnant women to state their preferences in relation to the birth process. Methods: This qualitative research with a phenomenological design was carried out to record the experiences of women who presented a Birth Plan. Sample selection was carried out using non-probabilistic, intentional and convenience sampling, selecting seven participants who were willing to participate and share their experiences. Results: After analyzing the content of the interviews, four categories emerged: “respecting the woman’s wishes: humanizing the birth process”, “information and primary Care”, “expectations regarding the care received” and “results of using the birth plan”, with their corresponding subcategories. Conclusion: Women consider it beneficial to present a Birth Plan, because it informs them about the process and gives them the opportunity to have a better experience, which takes into account their preferences for making the delivery less instrumental. In addition, they state the importance of having trained professionals involved, and call for more attention to be paid to the birth process in general. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Maternal, Fetal and Neonatal Health)

Review

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21 pages, 742 KiB  
Review
The Current Concept of Paternal Bonding: A Systematic Scoping Review
by Daichi Suzuki, Yukiko Ohashi, Eriko Shinohara, Yuriko Usui, Fukiko Yamada, Noyuri Yamaji, Kiriko Sasayama, Hitomi Suzuki, Romulo Fernandez Nieva, Jr., Katharina da Silva Lopes, Junko Miyazawa, Michiko Hase, Minoru Kabashima and Erika Ota
Healthcare 2022, 10(11), 2265; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare10112265 - 11 Nov 2022
Cited by 6 | Viewed by 2962
Abstract
Bonding is crucial to perinatal mental health. Despite an extensive body of literature on maternal bonding, few studies have focused on paternal bonding. This scoping review aimed to clarify the current state of the concept of paternal–infant/fetus bonding. The eligibility criteria were drawn [...] Read more.
Bonding is crucial to perinatal mental health. Despite an extensive body of literature on maternal bonding, few studies have focused on paternal bonding. This scoping review aimed to clarify the current state of the concept of paternal–infant/fetus bonding. The eligibility criteria were drawn from the population concept and context elements to answer the following questions: “what is paternal bonding?” and “what are the constructs of the concept of paternal bonding?” The review comprised 39 studies. Paternal bonding was associated with both positive and negative paternal behavior and thought and may be determined based on fathers’ beliefs and rearing history. Most studies showed that father–child interaction is one of the factors promoting paternal bonding. However, fathers generally felt more distant from their babies post-delivery than mothers. Only a few studies originally defined paternal bonding; most relied on the definitions of maternal bonding. We found different descriptions lacking consensus. Few studies examined the differences between paternal and maternal bonding. No consensus exists on the concept, constructs, and assessment of paternal bonding. The causal relationship between paternal bonding and other variables is unexplored. Future studies should explore fathers’ perspectives and experiences, focusing on the unknown aspects of paternal bonding identified in this review. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Maternal, Fetal and Neonatal Health)
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17 pages, 724 KiB  
Review
Queens and Wet Nurses: Indispensable Women in the Dynasty of the Sun King (1540–1580)
by Sagrario Gómez-Cantarino, Laura Romera-Álvarez, Mercedes de Dios-Aguado, María Idoia Ugarte-Gurrutxaga, José Siles-Gonzalez and Maylene Cotto-Andino
Healthcare 2022, 10(2), 316; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare10020316 - 07 Feb 2022
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 2041
Abstract
In Spain, the wet nurse had a prominent place in the Court of Philip II (1540–1580), suckling princes. The aim of this review is to identify the role of wet nurses in the Spanish monarchy and the survival of the infants, who were [...] Read more.
In Spain, the wet nurse had a prominent place in the Court of Philip II (1540–1580), suckling princes. The aim of this review is to identify the role of wet nurses in the Spanish monarchy and the survival of the infants, who were children of Philip II (16th century). A scoping review is presented, studying documents on wet nurses in the Spanish monarchy. The dialectical structural model of care (DSMC) is applied, and three thematic blocks are used to make up the historical-cultural model. Books, chapters and databases were analysed from Cuiden, Pubmed, Scopus, Science Direct and Google Scholar, from January–September 2021. These wet nurses were treated as ladies, as they came from wealthy families related to royalty. The services of wet nurses from neighbouring localities to the court were used. They had to be of good appearance and in excellent health. They were hired because of the need for survival of the infants, children of Philip II. The functions of the four wives of Philip II were relegated to reproduction, childcare, family and monarchical duties. They used empirical medicine in the form of prescriptions for beauty, hygiene and feminine care. The wet nurses were the driving force that promoted the health of babies through breastfeeding. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Maternal, Fetal and Neonatal Health)
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Other

11 pages, 858 KiB  
Brief Report
The Mediation Effect of Coping Strategies between Personality and Blood Pressure in Pregnancy Complicated by Hypertension
by Sabrina Chapuis-de-Andrade, Carmen Moret-Tatay, Tatiana Quarti Irigaray, Ivan Carlos Ferreira Antonello and Bartira Ercília Pinheiro da Costa
Healthcare 2022, 10(2), 341; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare10020341 - 10 Feb 2022
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1573
Abstract
Background: Hypertension is the most common medical condition during pregnancy. Hypertensive disorders are associated with an increased risk of adverse outcomes for both mother and fetus. This study examined the role played by personality and coping strategies in relation to blood pressure levels [...] Read more.
Background: Hypertension is the most common medical condition during pregnancy. Hypertensive disorders are associated with an increased risk of adverse outcomes for both mother and fetus. This study examined the role played by personality and coping strategies in relation to blood pressure levels during pregnancy. The specific goal was to study whether coping strategies can mediate the effect of personality in pregnant women with hypertension. Methods: A sample of 351 pregnant women was enlisted, encompassing 192 pregnancies complicated by hypertension. This is a cross-sectional study where personality traits were measured by the five-factor model and coping was evaluated by Jalowiec’s coping inventory scale. Results: Personality can partially predict systolic and diastolic blood pressure. Openness to experience trait is inversely correlated with systolic and diastolic blood pressure. Conversely, emotion-focused coping directly correlated with blood pressure levels. Systolic (β = −0.14; p < 0.05) and diastolic (β = −0.15; p < 0.05) blood pressure were also predicted by openness to experience. Conclusions: It is recommended to reinforce the development of coping strategies which focus more on the problem than on the emotion, avoiding detrimental effects of emotional coping in blood pressure levels during pregnancy. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Maternal, Fetal and Neonatal Health)
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