Recent Advances in Haemostasis and Thrombosis Research in Cancer

A special issue of Healthcare (ISSN 2227-9032).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (28 February 2022) | Viewed by 11916

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Discipline of Pharmacy, School of Health Sciences, Faculty of Health, University of Canberra, Canberra 2617, Australia
Interests: venous thromboembolism; stroke; thrombosis; coagulation; platelets; prevention; risk assessment; diabetes
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Guest Editor
Department of Medical and Surgical Sciences, Magna Graecia University, Catanzaro, Italy
Interests: cardiovascular disease; biomarkers; interventional cardiology; atherothrombosis; atherosclerosis
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

As the guest co-editors, we are pleased to announce this Special Issue on the topic of “Recent Advances in Haemostasis and Thrombosis Research in Cancer”. All types of manuscripts will be welcome.

Despite recent advances in cancer research such as the introduction of novel antimetabolite drugs and immune checkpoint inhibitors, oncology patients are frequently threatened by complications of cancer such as venous or arterial thrombosis, which could paradoxically be worse in patients receiving cancer treatment. Some types of cancer such as gastrointestinal malignancies, lung cancer, and pancreatic cancer are known for their stronger associations with thrombotic conditions.

Continuous progress in the clinical management and treatment of these patients opens new debates on the optimal use of therapeutic innovations in individual patients. In parallel, recent developments in the field of personalized medicine and Artificial Intelligence will propel further developments in developing VTE risk prediction models in patients with cancer.

The advent of the COVID-19 pandemic has put a spotlight on cancer patients. As we have learned, COVID-19 often comes along with severe thrombotic complications, and cancer patients are known to be more vulnerable to COVID-19 and exposed to a higher risk of severe disease course.

This Special Issue will cover recent advances in the knowledge of pathophysiology, prediction, diagnosis, and treatment of thromboembolic complications in patients with cancer in different clinical settings.

Prof. Dr. Salvatore De Rosa
Dr. Reza Mortazavi
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Healthcare is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2700 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • cardiovascular disease
  • thrombosis
  • risk prediction models
  • thromboembolism
  • coagulation
  • anticoagulants
  • cancer
  • Artificial Intelligence, precision medicine
  • COVID-19

Published Papers (4 papers)

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18 pages, 386 KiB  
Review
The Intriguing Connections between von Willebrand Factor, ADAMTS13 and Cancer
by Chanukya K. Colonne, Emmanuel J. Favaloro and Leonardo Pasalic
Healthcare 2022, 10(3), 557; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare10030557 - 16 Mar 2022
Cited by 9 | Viewed by 3383
Abstract
von Willebrand factor (VWF) is a complex and large protein that is cleaved by ADAMTS13 (a disintegrin and metalloproteinase with thrombospondin type 1 motif, member 13), and together they serve important roles in normal hemostasis. Malignancy can result in both a deficiency or [...] Read more.
von Willebrand factor (VWF) is a complex and large protein that is cleaved by ADAMTS13 (a disintegrin and metalloproteinase with thrombospondin type 1 motif, member 13), and together they serve important roles in normal hemostasis. Malignancy can result in both a deficiency or excess of VWF, leading to aberrant hemostasis with either increased bleeding or thrombotic complications, as respectively seen with acquired von Willebrand syndrome and cancer-associated venous thromboembolism. There is emerging evidence to suggest VWF also plays a role in inflammation, angiogenesis and tumor biology, and it is likely that VWF promotes tumor metastasis. High VWF levels have been documented in a number of malignancies and in some cases correlate with more advanced disease and poor prognosis. Tumor cells can induce endothelial cells to release VWF and certain tumor cells have the capacity for de novo expression of VWF, leading to a proinflammatory microenvironment that is likely conducive to tumor progression, metastasis and micro-thrombosis. VWF can facilitate tumor cell adhesion to endothelial cells and aids with the recruitment of platelets into the tumor microenvironment, where tumor/platelet aggregates are able to form and facilitate hematogenous spread of cancer. As ADAMTS13 moderates VWF level and activity, it too is potentially involved in the pathophysiology of these events. VWF and ADAMTS13 have been explored as tumor biomarkers for the detection and prognostication of certain malignancies; however, the results are underdeveloped and so currently not utilized for clinical use. Further studies addressing the basic science mechanisms and real word epidemiology are required to better appreciate the intriguing connections between VWF, ADAMTS13 and malignancy. A better understanding of the role VWF and ADAMTS13 play in the promotion and inhibition of cancer and its metastasis will help direct further translational studies to aid with the development of novel cancer prognostic tools and treatment modalities. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recent Advances in Haemostasis and Thrombosis Research in Cancer)
18 pages, 761 KiB  
Review
Arguments for Using Direct Oral Anticoagulants in Cancer-Related Venous Thromboembolism
by Roxana Mihaela Chiorescu, Mihaela Mocan, Mirela Anca Stoia, Anamaria Barta, Cerasela Mihaela Goidescu, Stefan Chiorescu and Anca Daniela Farcaş
Healthcare 2021, 9(10), 1287; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare9101287 - 28 Sep 2021
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1942
Abstract
(1) Background: Patients with cancer with a hypercoagulable state present an increased incidence of venous thromboembolism (VTE). Neoplastic patients with concurrent VTE undergoing anticoagulant treatment face a series of issues. (2) The aim of the present paper is to systematically summarize current VTE [...] Read more.
(1) Background: Patients with cancer with a hypercoagulable state present an increased incidence of venous thromboembolism (VTE). Neoplastic patients with concurrent VTE undergoing anticoagulant treatment face a series of issues. (2) The aim of the present paper is to systematically summarize current VTE management in patients with neoplasia and to review the current clinical evidence from meta-analyses of randomized controlled trials and guidelines regarding the administration of direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs) for cancer-associated VTE. (3) Search Strategy: We performed a review on meta-analyses of randomized controlled trials and guidelines in favor of the administration of DOACs in patients with cancer-associated VTE published in the last 6 years in the Medline (PubMed) and Embase databases. (4) Results: 21 meta-analyses, 14 randomized controlled studies comparing DOACs to VKAs and LMWH, and 7 national and international guidelines were identified. We identified five studies that show the antineoplastic effect of DOAC on experimental models. (5) Conclusions: DOACs can be seen as the first choice for VTE treatment in neoplastic patients who have a low risk of bleeding, who do not have severe renal impairment, and who are not undergoing treatments that could interact with DOAC’s mechanism of action. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recent Advances in Haemostasis and Thrombosis Research in Cancer)
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13 pages, 293 KiB  
Review
Risk Factors and Prediction Models for Venous Thromboembolism in Ambulatory Patients with Lung Cancer
by Ann-Rong Yan, Indira Samarawickrema, Mark Naunton, Gregory M. Peterson, Desmond Yip, Salvatore De Rosa and Reza Mortazavi
Healthcare 2021, 9(6), 778; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare9060778 - 21 Jun 2021
Cited by 10 | Viewed by 3992
Abstract
Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is a significant cause of mortality in patients with lung cancer. Despite the availability of a wide range of anticoagulants to help prevent thrombosis, thromboprophylaxis in ambulatory patients is a challenge due to its associated risk of haemorrhage. As a [...] Read more.
Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is a significant cause of mortality in patients with lung cancer. Despite the availability of a wide range of anticoagulants to help prevent thrombosis, thromboprophylaxis in ambulatory patients is a challenge due to its associated risk of haemorrhage. As a result, anticoagulation is only recommended in patients with a relatively high risk of VTE. Efforts have been made to develop predictive models for VTE risk assessment in cancer patients, but the availability of a reliable predictive model for ambulate patients with lung cancer is unclear. We have analysed the latest information on this topic, with a focus on the lung cancer-related risk factors for VTE, and risk prediction models developed and validated in this group of patients. The existing risk models, such as the Khorana score, the PROTECHT score and the CONKO score, have shown poor performance in external validations, failing to identify many high-risk individuals. Some of the newly developed and updated models may be promising, but their further validation is needed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recent Advances in Haemostasis and Thrombosis Research in Cancer)

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8 pages, 4771 KiB  
Case Report
Major Hepatectomy En Bloc with Cava Vein Resection for Locally Invasive Caudate Lobe Hepatocarcinoma
by Nicolae Bacalbasa, Irina Balescu, Florin Ichim, Ion Barbu, Alexandru Ristea, Razvan Lazea, Ioana Danciuc, Ioana Popa, Ovidiu Magdoiu, Gabriela Smira, Camelia Diaconu, Florentina Furtunescu, Ovidiu Stiru, Cornel Savu, Claudia Stoica, Vladislav Brasoveanu, Bogdan Ursut and Adnan Al Aloul
Healthcare 2021, 9(10), 1396; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare9101396 - 19 Oct 2021
Viewed by 1498
Abstract
Background/Aim: Locally advanced liver tumours with vascular invasion have been considered for a long period of time as unresectable lesions, so the patient was further deferred to oncology services for palliation. However, improvement of the surgical techniques and the results reported so far [...] Read more.
Background/Aim: Locally advanced liver tumours with vascular invasion have been considered for a long period of time as unresectable lesions, so the patient was further deferred to oncology services for palliation. However, improvement of the surgical techniques and the results reported so far came to demonstrate that extended hepatic and vascular resections might be safely performed in such cases and might significantly improve the long-term outcomes. Materials and Methods: A 61-year-old patient was diagnosed with a caudate lobe tumour invading the inferior cava vein and the right hepatic pedicle. Results: The patient was successfully submitted to surgery, and an extended right hepatectomy en bloc with cava vein resection was performed; the continuity of the cava vein was re-established by the placement of a synthetic graft. The postoperative outcome was uneventful. Conclusions: Although initially considered as a formal contraindication for resection, vascular invasion of the greater vessels should not preclude surgery if complete resection is achievable. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recent Advances in Haemostasis and Thrombosis Research in Cancer)
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