Stroke in the Elderly

A special issue of Geriatrics (ISSN 2308-3417).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 October 2020) | Viewed by 9163

Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
Division of Population Medicine, Cardiff University, Penarth CF64 2XX, UK
Interests: surgery in older people; stroke; patient-reported outcome measures and diabetes in older people
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

We are delighted to announce the launch of the Special Issue of “Stroke in the Elderly”. As the population ages and advances continue that see improvement in stroke for people of older age, it is becoming increasingly important to properly evidence this area.

We are looking forward to a range of articles covering all aspects of this exciting area. They may explore the differences in outcomes between older and younger stroke populations or reflect new data purely studying older people suffering stroke. There is also considerable scope for studying stroke in the oldest old.

We would be particularly keen to see how common concepts in Geriatric medicine, such as frailty, sarcopenia, falls or polypharmacy (to name but a few) play a role in this population.

We look forwards to receiving your work.

Dr. Jonathan Hewitt
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Geriatrics is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • stroke
  • elderly
  • older person
  • olderst old

 

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

13 pages, 233 KiB  
Article
Experiences of Dysphagia after Stroke: An Interview Study of Stroke Survivors and Their Informal Caregivers
by Sabrina A. Eltringham, Sue Pownall, Ben Bray, Craig J. Smith, Laura Piercy and Karen Sage
Geriatrics 2019, 4(4), 67; https://doi.org/10.3390/geriatrics4040067 - 7 Dec 2019
Cited by 9 | Viewed by 8493
Abstract
(1) Background: Swallowing difficulties (dysphagia) after stroke are not uncommon and is a consistent risk factor for stroke-associated pneumonia. This interview study explores the perspectives of stroke survivors, who had their swallowing assessed in the first few days of admission to hospital, and [...] Read more.
(1) Background: Swallowing difficulties (dysphagia) after stroke are not uncommon and is a consistent risk factor for stroke-associated pneumonia. This interview study explores the perspectives of stroke survivors, who had their swallowing assessed in the first few days of admission to hospital, and their informal caregivers. (2) Methods: A participatory approach was used involving people affected by stroke in the interpretation and analysis of the interview data. Data was thematically analysed and six themes were identified. (3) Results: These themes included how past-future experiences may influence a person’s emotional response to events; understanding what is happening and adjustment; the impact of dysphagia; attitudes to care; communication to patients and procedural issues. (4) Conclusion: The findings highlight the importance of effective public health messages to improve people’s responsiveness to the signs of stroke, standardisation of assessment and management procedures, effective communication to patients about the consequences of dysphagia, and the impact of dysphagia on the person who had the stroke and their informal caregiver. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Stroke in the Elderly)
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