Research Advances in Management and Design of Forest Operations

A special issue of Forests (ISSN 1999-4907). This special issue belongs to the section "Forest Operations and Engineering".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 December 2024 | Viewed by 1922

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Department of Agricultural and Forest Sciences, University of Tuscia, Via S. Camillo de Lellis, 01100 Viterbo, Italy
Interests: forest utilizations; logging activities; reduced impact logging; sustainable forest management; forest restoration systems
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E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Agricultural and Forest Sciences, University of Tuscia, Via S. Camillo de Lellis, 01100 Viterbo, Italy
Interests: sustainable forest operations; reduced impact logging; QBS-ar index; sustainable forest management; forest mechanisation
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Even if the global megatrends and operational challenges drive us to operate more efficiently and sustainably across all sectors, forest management must be given more attention. In particular, one of the most important challenges that forest managers will continue to face regard the adaptation of forest management and operations to changing climatic conditions. In recent years, the new concept of Climate-Smart Forestry has arisen. CSF is a targeted approach or strategy used to increase the climate benefits from forests and the forest sector in a synergistic way. CSF cannot be separated by the sustainable implementation of forest operations. In this context, it is important to consider the new comprehensive research, development and innovation (RDI) studies, improving the cost, energy efficiency and quality of wood-harvesting operations, long-distance transport and forest road planning. The rapid development of technology, combined with an increase in the demand for wood and reduced access to manpower, is resulting in significant progress in the construction of machines used in forestry. One clear example is Forest 4.0, which represents the integration of advanced digital technologies, such as artificial intelligence, the Internet of Things, blockchain, and big data analytics, into forest management practices. The main goals of all these recent topics include optimizing resource utilization, reducing waste, improving supply chain management, and enhancing the decision-making process through data-driven insights.

In this regard, we would like to create a multi-point of view compendium of the research on the management and planning of forest operations to cope with changing climatic conditions and with the modern challenges that forest managers have to deal with. We invite both original research papers and literature reviews touching on the following topics:

  • Shaping sustainable forest operations in a changing climate;
  • The evaluation of the sustainability of forest operations under the point of view of the three pillars (economy, environment and society);
  • The assessment of the environmental impacts related to forest operations and design of best management practices for mitigation and/or adaptation to changing climate;
  • Innovative forest harvesting systems, technology and techniques;
  • The role and potential of precision forestry (robotics, LIDAR, trafficability maps, etc.) for improving the sustainability of forest operations;
  • Environmentally friendly forest operations and reduced impact logging (RIL);
  • How forest operations can be adjusted to preserve levels of biodiversity necessary to keep forests healthy and productive.

We encourage studies from all fields, including experimental studies, monitoring approaches and models, on silviculture and logging activities, to contribute to this Special Issue in order to promote knowledge and adaptation strategies for the active management, preservation, and future development of Climate-Smart Forest Operations.

Prof. Dr. Rodolfo Picchio
Dr. Francesco Latterini
Dr. Rachele Venanzi
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Forests is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • climate-smart forest operations
  • harvesting systems
  • sustainable forest management
  • best management practices
  • trafficability maps
  • reduced-impact logging (RIL) techniques

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

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17 pages, 4554 KiB  
Article
Production of Chestnut Coppice Biomass in a Framework of Low Mechanization and High Expectations to Combat Climate Change and Other Social Expectations
by Francesco Carbone, Luigi Portoghesi, Manuela Romagnoli, Francesco Barbarese and Teresa Grassi
Forests 2024, 15(3), 412; https://doi.org/10.3390/f15030412 - 21 Feb 2024
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Abstract
Climate change has become one of the most critical problems facing modern society. Sustainable forest management can be an important solution to counter the increasing concentration of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere. In particular, management of the chestnut forest could prove to be [...] Read more.
Climate change has become one of the most critical problems facing modern society. Sustainable forest management can be an important solution to counter the increasing concentration of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere. In particular, management of the chestnut forest could prove to be an effective strategy to absorb carbon dioxide as this species is characterized by sustained growth, so it has a high capacity to store carbon, and through the use of wood products, it is possible to sequester it for a considerable period. Chestnut (Castanea sativa Mill.) forests cover an area of about 800,000 ha in Italy, most of which is managed as coppice. It plays a central role in the Latium Region where its productive function is very important, as it provides timber of excellent quality. The purpose of this paper is to verify whether the current management of chestnut is efficient, as well as whether retractable wood products can contribute to the fight against climate change. The chestnut coppice located in the municipality of Tolfa (Lazio region, Italy) produces timber for 352 m3/ha and stores about 390,000 kg of CO2. Wood residues and losses during woodworking, together with emissions for the use of machineries, generate emissions of 368,000 kg of CO2. The chestnut semi-finished products, with long-term use prospects, retain a net volume of 22,000 kg of CO2. Although this is good for combating climate change, the amount of CO2 stored is very low, less than 6% of the CO2 stored by functional unit. Chestnut wood has a high versatility of use, so it could replace several products generated by fossil raw materials. Moreover, the implementation of precision forestry, the adoption of forest management more oriented to favor larger plants, the development of local economies and the reduction in the carbon footprint of the wood supply chain through the use of sustainable technologies would increase the capacity for climate change mitigation and increase the added value of its products. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Research Advances in Management and Design of Forest Operations)
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16 pages, 2020 KiB  
Review
Comparison between Different Mechanization Systems: Economic Sustainability of Harvesting Poplar Plantations in Italy
by Valerio Di Stefano, Giorgia Di Domenico, Michele Menta, Elisa Pontuale, Leonardo Bianchini and Andrea Colantoni
Forests 2024, 15(3), 397; https://doi.org/10.3390/f15030397 - 20 Feb 2024
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Abstract
After a period of significant development, poplar cultivation in Italy has been in rapid decline since the 1980s. Because of its marked ductility, poplar is valuable for both wood furniture and energy production. Production could be increased through mechanization, because innovative machinery and [...] Read more.
After a period of significant development, poplar cultivation in Italy has been in rapid decline since the 1980s. Because of its marked ductility, poplar is valuable for both wood furniture and energy production. Production could be increased through mechanization, because innovative machinery and equipment can reduce the exposure of forest workers to common risk factors, ensure greater and better productivity, increase the efficiency of operations, and reduce costs. There are various systems for the mechanization of poplar production (from traditional to advanced and pushed mechanization). We describe the range of possibilities (in terms of both the techniques adopted and the machines used) for planting, harvesting, and chopping poplar. Based on our analysis of operating costs, we conclude that mechanized poplar production could reduce the average cost per ton of wood chips (EUR/t) by 23% and the average gross cost per hectare of wood chips produced (EUR/ha) by 37%. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Research Advances in Management and Design of Forest Operations)
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