Fungi in Forest Ecosystems: Systematics, Diversity and Ecology

A special issue of Forests (ISSN 1999-4907). This special issue belongs to the section "Forest Biodiversity".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 November 2023) | Viewed by 1290

Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
Institute of Microbiology, School of Ecology and Nature Conservation, Beijing Forestry University, P.O. Box 61, Beijing 100083, China
Interests: fungal resources; fungal diversity; phylogeny and systematics of macrofungi; fungal ecology; fungal enzymes; edible and medicinal fungi
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This Special Issue, "Fungi in Forest Ecosystems: Systematics, Diversity and Ecology", focuses on the study of fungi in forest ecosystems. The aim of this Special Issue is to provide a platform for researchers to share their latest findings on and insights into the role of fungi in forest ecosystems, fungal diversity, community structure, ecological interactions within forest ecosystems, the systematics and evolution of fungi, and the role of fungi in nutrient cycling as well as carbon storage. Overall, this Special Issue aims to provide a comprehensive overview of the importance of fungi in forest ecosystems and their impact on ecosystem functioning.

The Special Issue welcomes articles that cover a wide range of topics related to fungi, including their taxonomy, diversity, molecular phylogeny, community structure, and ecological interactions, highlighting the importance of fungi in nutrient cycling, carbon storage, and other key ecosystem processes, in addition to the complex relationships between fungi and other organisms in forest ecosystems, including plants, animals, and microorganisms. Overall, this Special Issue provides a valuable resource for researchers and practitioners working in the fields of forest ecology and management.

Prof. Dr. Baokai Cui
Guest Editor

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Keywords

  • fungal diversity
  • forest ecosystems
  • systematics
  • molecular phylogeny
  • macrofungi in forests
  • community structure
  • fungal ecology

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

14 pages, 1921 KiB  
Article
Fungal Community Taxa Differ in Diversity and Number between Live and Dead Prunus serotina Ehrh. Wood in a Protected Forest within Its Secondary Range of Distribution
by Marlena Baranowska, Robert Korzeniewicz, Jolanta Behnke-Borowczyk, Wojciech Kowalkowski, Dariusz Krupiński, Andrzej Purcel and Adrian Łukowski
Forests 2023, 14(7), 1324; https://doi.org/10.3390/f14071324 - 28 Jun 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1019
Abstract
Prunus serotina is an important invasive plant species in Poland. It was introduced to European forests, even in places currently protected by law, such as national parks. One major factor contributing to the spread of this species is the lack of infecting pathogens [...] Read more.
Prunus serotina is an important invasive plant species in Poland. It was introduced to European forests, even in places currently protected by law, such as national parks. One major factor contributing to the spread of this species is the lack of infecting pathogens and incomplete knowledge about the relationship between the plant and microorganisms. This study aimed to identify fungal communities collected from freshly cut stumps of live and dead black cherry tree specimens growing in a protected forest. The main working hypotheses were as follows: (i) fungal communities inhabiting the wood of dead and living trees will differ in diversity and the number of taxa; and (ii) saprotrophic fungi will dominate in the wood of dead tree stumps. This study applied Illumina sequencing based on the amplification of the fungal ribosomal ITSI region. The average number of sequences (OTU) obtained from the analysis of dead tree wood was 101,758, while that of living trees was 94,150. These sequences belonged to 312 taxa, among which 254 were isolated from the wood of dead trees and 171 from that of living trees. Among the saprotrophs on dead trees, the following species were identified: Stereum rugosum, Ganoderma adspersum, G. applanatum, Peniophora cinerea, and Ascocoryne cylichnium. On the other hand, in the wood of living trees, Cytospora leucostoma and Botrytis cinerea were the most abundant saprotrophic species. The fungal communities inhabiting the wood of dead and living trees differed in the diversity and abundance of taxa, thus confirming our hypothesis. The results of our research conducted in a protected area indicate that black cherry wood can be naturally colonized by many pathogen species that can further limit its expansion. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Fungi in Forest Ecosystems: Systematics, Diversity and Ecology)
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