Hypothalamic Involvement in Human Health

A special issue of Endocrines (ISSN 2673-396X). This special issue belongs to the section "Endocrine Immunology, Cytokines and Cell Signaling".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (15 December 2023) | Viewed by 4464

Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
1. College of Pharmacy, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX, USA
2. Dell Medical School, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX, USA
Interests: cholestatic liver diseases; hypothalamic neuropeptides; drug-induced liver disease; NASH/NAFLD; hepatic encephalopathy
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The hypothalamus is a vital part of the central nervous system and responds to a variety of signals from the internal and external environment. The hypothalamus plays a significant role in the endocrine system. It synthesizes and secretes certain neurohormones, called releasing hormones or hypothalamic hormones, and these in turn stimulate or inhibit the secretion of hormones from the pituitary gland. The hypothalamus controls a wide range of physiological and psychological processes, including energy homeostasis, reproduction, circadian rhythms, thermoregulation, and emotional and behavioral patterns.

This Special Issue will include a selection of recent research and review articles focused on hypothalamic and human health. Up-to-date review articles, commentaries, and experimental papers are all welcome.

Prof. Dr. Sharon DeMorrow
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • pituitary
  • nervous system
  • hormone release
  • human health
  • stimulation
  • endocrinology
  • steroids

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Review

15 pages, 312 KiB  
Review
A Scoping Review of Potential Biological Mechanisms and Predictors of Interpersonal Psychotherapy
by Victoria Papke, Hopewell Hodges, Kristina Reigstad, Meredith Gunlicks-Stoessel and Bonnie Klimes-Dougan
Endocrines 2023, 4(4), 742-756; https://doi.org/10.3390/endocrines4040054 - 1 Dec 2023
Viewed by 1002
Abstract
Social dysfunction plays a critical role in the development and maintenance of depression in both adolescents and adults. Interpersonal psychotherapy (IPT) and interpersonal psychotherapy for depressed adolescents (IPT-A) are effective, evidence-based, and time-limited treatments for depression that aim to mitigate depressive symptoms by [...] Read more.
Social dysfunction plays a critical role in the development and maintenance of depression in both adolescents and adults. Interpersonal psychotherapy (IPT) and interpersonal psychotherapy for depressed adolescents (IPT-A) are effective, evidence-based, and time-limited treatments for depression that aim to mitigate depressive symptoms by strengthening an individual’s interpersonal relationships and skills. Though the efficacy of IPT/IPT-A has been well established, we are just beginning to know how biological systems are implicated in its success. In this scoping review, we examine the extant literature on biological mechanisms and predictors of IPT/IPT-A treatment efficacy. Overall, seven studies were identified that consider biological processes in the context of evaluating IPT/IPTA, and the studies that were conducted are typically preliminary in nature. Notably, there is some evidence showing that the hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenal axis, various frontal and limbic brain regions, and behavioral indexes that represent brain functioning are associated with changes in IPT/IPT-A or predictive of IPT/IPT-A outcomes. We also consider consequences for treatment and future research. The hope is that a better understanding of how and for whom IPT/IPT-A works can optimize the success of the treatment in reducing an individual’s depressive symptoms. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Hypothalamic Involvement in Human Health)
31 pages, 1038 KiB  
Review
The Role of Hypothalamic Neuropeptides in Regulation of Liver Functions in Health and Disease
by Anca D. Petrescu, Su Yeon An, Juliet Venter, Matthew McMillin and Sharon DeMorrow
Endocrines 2023, 4(2), 457-487; https://doi.org/10.3390/endocrines4020034 - 20 Jun 2023
Viewed by 2897
Abstract
The communication between brain and peripheral tissues is mediated by neuropeptides that coordinate the functions of each organ with the activities of the entire body in specific environmental conditions. Hypothalamic neuropeptides act as neurotransmitters and hormones to regulate the physiology of food intake, [...] Read more.
The communication between brain and peripheral tissues is mediated by neuropeptides that coordinate the functions of each organ with the activities of the entire body in specific environmental conditions. Hypothalamic neuropeptides act as neurotransmitters and hormones to regulate the physiology of food intake, digestion, and metabolism, having a direct or indirect impact on the liver. Investigations on liver pathologies found that dysfunctions of neuropeptides and their receptors are associated with liver disorders such as non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, steatohepatitis, cholestasis, cirrhosis, and liver cancer. In this article, we reviewed neuropeptides that regulate energy homeostasis and lipid and glucose metabolism in the liver and are associated with liver injuries. Firstly, peptides involved in regulatory processes in the brain and liver, such as neuropeptide Y, agouti-related protein, and the galanin family, are related to obesity and its comorbidities, including type 2 diabetes and metabolic syndrome, are presented. Secondly, a comprehensive review of neuropeptides such as secretin, vasoactive intestinal peptide, substance P, and somatostatin, which are involved in liver injuries unrelated to obesity; i.e., cholestasis-induced biliary hyperplasia, cirrhosis, hepatocellular carcinoma, and cholangiocarcinoma, is also presented. The cellular and molecular mechanisms underlining liver injuries related to the dysfunction of these neuropeptides and receptors are also described. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Hypothalamic Involvement in Human Health)
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