The Nature, Quality and Dynamics of Teacher–Pupil Relationships in the Classroom

A special issue of Education Sciences (ISSN 2227-7102).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 January 2024) | Viewed by 6159

Special Issue Editors

School of Education, University of Worcester, Worcester, WR2 6AJ, UK
Interests: educational relationships and identities; theoretical and methodological approaches; influence of teacher identity and career phase; classroom relationships and interactions;
School of Education, University of Worcester, Worcester, WR2 6AJ, UK
Interests: social psychology of education; effective pupil-teacher relationships; alienation in secondary school education

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues:

There is a consensus in the literature that the nature, quality and dynamics of the relationships between pupils and teachers have wide-reaching implications on behaviour, social interactions, and academic achievement. The way a child experiences school, and particularly their relationship with their teachers, has also been shown to have a profound effect on their engagement at school, academic development, and psychological well-being. Furthermore, positive teacher–pupil relationships have been recognised to contribute to the social, emotional and cognitive development of children. However, the impact of negative relationship experiences can have implications on behavior that extend beyond the scope of the classroom and into adulthood.

The aim of this Special Issue is to provide an understanding of contemporary research in the area, focusing on the pertinent issues that impact this type of relationship within the current global educational context. Original research articles and reviews are welcome, and we are interested in studies using a variety of methodological and theoretical approaches. Research areas may include, but are by no means limited to, the following:

  • The impact of social and/or emotional issues;
  • The influence of individual teacher characteristics;
  • Variations in teacher–pupil interactions and behaviours;
  • Nature and causes of pupil alienation;
  • The role of parents and other external influences;
  • Changes in relationships outside of the classroom.

We look forward to receiving your contributions.

Prof. Alison Kington
Dr. Ben Looker
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a double-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Education Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • teacher–pupil relationships
  • interaction and behavior
  • educational identities
  • individual differences
  • school-based research

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

45 pages, 4534 KiB  
Article
A Qualitative Study into Teacher–Student Interaction Strategies Employed to Support Primary School Children’s Working Memory
by Simona Sankalaite, Mariëtte Huizinga, Sophie Pollé, Canmei Xu, Nicky De Vries, Emma Hens and Dieter Baeyens
Educ. Sci. 2023, 13(11), 1149; https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci13111149 - 17 Nov 2023
Viewed by 4064
Abstract
The current qualitative study examined the teacher–student interaction and its influence on children’s working memory in primary schools in Belgium and the Netherlands. Eighteen primary school teachers participated in semi-structured interviews focusing on strategies employed to support students with working memory difficulties. The [...] Read more.
The current qualitative study examined the teacher–student interaction and its influence on children’s working memory in primary schools in Belgium and the Netherlands. Eighteen primary school teachers participated in semi-structured interviews focusing on strategies employed to support students with working memory difficulties. The study offered a comprehensive overview of the strategies, categorised into instructional support, classroom organisation, and emotional support (based on the Teaching Through Interactions framework) that teachers use when dealing with working memory-related difficulties. Additionally, it provided unique insights into teachers’ underlying beliefs and rationales about the effectiveness of these strategies. Lastly, factors influencing the use and efficacy of these strategies (based on the Multilevel Supply–Use model) were explored. By integrating teachers’ voices and experiences, this research provides a unique opportunity to bridge theory and practice, and enrich the current understanding and interpretation of the teacher–student interaction and its implications for improving working memory performance in primary school students. Overall, the holistic approach, taking into account both direct and indirect approaches, offered a comprehensive understanding of the multifaceted challenges faced by students with working memory difficulties and the diverse strategies teachers can employ to address them, which can further inform classroom practices, professional development, and policy-making. Full article
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18 pages, 1938 KiB  
Article
Close and Conflictual: How Pupil–Teacher Relationships Can Contribute to the Alienation of Pupils from Secondary School
by Benjamin Looker, Alison Kington and Jason Vickers
Educ. Sci. 2023, 13(10), 1009; https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci13101009 - 04 Oct 2023
Viewed by 1152
Abstract
This article presents previously unreported findings from a larger grounded theory study which explored the intersection between pupil–teacher relationships and secondary pupils who are experiencing school alienation. Mixed data were gathered, using a questionnaire exploring teachers’ perceptions of their relationships with their students, [...] Read more.
This article presents previously unreported findings from a larger grounded theory study which explored the intersection between pupil–teacher relationships and secondary pupils who are experiencing school alienation. Mixed data were gathered, using a questionnaire exploring teachers’ perceptions of their relationships with their students, alongside semi-structured, exploratory interviews with teachers and alienated pupils. A critical realist grounded theory design was employed, identifying closeness and conflict as causative mechanisms contributing new insights into the phenomena of school alienation. This approach allowed for data to be triangulated, constantly compared, and used to verify findings. This study discovered some pupils experience a more pronounced subset of alienation, where teachers perceive their relationships with such pupils as being less close and more conflictual when compared to their peers. It also identified that these pupils place an emphasis on negative experiences early into the formation of relationships with their teachers. Such experiences are viewed as critical incidents which are difficult to forget by alienated pupils. A diagram summarising this mechanism is presented, and the paper concludes with some professional strategies for teachers to help repair the relationship and reduce pupils’ feelings of alienation. Full article
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