Advances in Gifted and Talented and Creativity Research

A special issue of Education Sciences (ISSN 2227-7102).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 June 2016) | Viewed by 49155

Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
Education Psychology & Learning Systems, College of Education, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL 32306-4453, USA
Interests: social and emotional needs of the gifted; talent identification and development; test development

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

 

Exceptional achievements have long held the interest of mankind. The explanations for eminent accomplishments have varied over the course of world history. Today, exceptional achievements and conceptions of giftedness incorporate neuroanatomical, bio-behavioral, genetic, socio-cultural, familial, and environmental influences. We now recognize that in early childhood, ability manifests itself as relatively unspecified cognitive, behavioral, and affective potentials that will be influenced, shaped, facilitated and, at times, moderated by a host of reciprocal influences in the developing child’s social world (Bloom, 1985; Sternberg, 2001; Subotnik, et al., 2011).

Knowledge concerning the gifted and talented and creativity has expanded exponentially in the past fifteen years. Researchers today are reporting on groundbreaking findings that are shedding important new light on all aspects of gifted identification, theories of intelligence, creativity, and cognitive abilities, the development of giftedness and talent, the influence of motivation, instruction, curriculum, and optimal match, the role of the family, school, and community, and what can be done to support individuals of high ability (Pfeiffer, 2013). This guest-edited issue, “Advances in Gifted and Talented and Creativity Research,” presents exciting research findings concerning high ability, talent development, creativity, emotional intelligence, mindset, and the factors that promote the development of eminence.

Bloom, B. J. (1985). Developing talent in young people. NY: Ballantine Books.
Pfeiffer, S. I. (2013). Serving the gifted. New York: Routledge.
Sternberg, R. J. (2001). Giftedness as developing expertise: A theory of the interface between high abilities and achieved excellence. High Ability Studies, 12, 159-179.
Subotnik, R. F., Olszewski-Kubilius, P., & Worrell, F. C. (2011). Rethinking giftedness and gifted education: A proposed direction forward based on psychological science. Psychological Science in the Public Interest, 12, 3-54.

Steven I Pfeiffer
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a double-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Education Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

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Keywords

  • the gifted
  • high ability
  • creativity
  • talent development
  • intelligence
  • gifted education
  • expertise
  • human ability

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Research

641 KiB  
Article
Networking Theories on Giftedness—What We Can Learn from Synthesizing Renzulli’s Domain General and Krutetskii’s Mathematics-Specific Theory
by Maike Schindler and Benjamin Rott
Educ. Sci. 2017, 7(1), 6; https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci7010006 - 29 Dec 2016
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 7512
Abstract
Giftedness is an increasingly important research topic in educational sciences and mathematics education in particular. In this paper, we contribute to further theorizing mathematical giftedness through illustrating how networking processes can be conducted and illustrating their potential benefits. The paper focuses on two [...] Read more.
Giftedness is an increasingly important research topic in educational sciences and mathematics education in particular. In this paper, we contribute to further theorizing mathematical giftedness through illustrating how networking processes can be conducted and illustrating their potential benefits. The paper focuses on two theories: Renzulli’s domain-general theory on giftedness as an interplay of creativity, above-average ability, and task commitment; and Krutetskii’s mathematics-specific theory on gifted students’ abilities. In a “proof of concept”, we illustrate how the abilities offered in Krutetskii’s theory can be mapped to the three traits described by Renzulli. This is realized through a mapping process in which two raters independently mapped the abilities offered by Krutetskii to Renzulli’s traits. The results of this mapping give first insights into (a) possible mappings of Krutetskii’s abilities to Renzulli’s traits and, thus, (b) a possible domain-specific specification of Renzulli’s theory. This mapping hints at interesting potential phenomena: in Krutetskii’s theory, above-average ability appears to be the trait that predominantly is addressed, whereas creativity and especially task-commitment seem less represented. Our mapping demonstrates what a mathematics-specific specification of Renzulli’s theory can look like. Finally, we elaborate on the consequences of our findings, restrictions of our methodology, and on possible future research. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Gifted and Talented and Creativity Research)
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1129 KiB  
Article
A Cross-National Study of Implicit Theories of a Creative Person
by Manuel Hopp, Marion Händel, Heidrun Stoeger, Wilma Vialle and Albert Ziegler
Educ. Sci. 2016, 6(4), 38; https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci6040038 - 23 Nov 2016
Cited by 8 | Viewed by 7040
Abstract
Implicit theories can influence learning behavior, the approaches individuals take to learning and performance situations, and the learning goals individuals set, as well as, indirectly, their accomplishments, intelligence, and creativity. For this cross-cultural study, Kenyan and German students were asked to draw a [...] Read more.
Implicit theories can influence learning behavior, the approaches individuals take to learning and performance situations, and the learning goals individuals set, as well as, indirectly, their accomplishments, intelligence, and creativity. For this cross-cultural study, Kenyan and German students were asked to draw a creative person and rate it on a number of attributes. The data indicated considerable differences among the implicit theories according to students’ gender and nationality. Kenyan girls, in particular, frequently ascribed a gender to their prototypical creative person that differed from their own, whereas the gender of the prototypical creative people drawn by German students was more equally spread. The data offer evidence that implicit theories of a creative person are multifaceted. Kenyan students value diligence as an important attribute of a creative person. In addition, social variables were seen as important, followed by talents in languages and mathematics. By contrast, German students valued imagination and talent in artistic areas, followed by diligence and social components. Their lowest rated attributes for creativity were talents in the domains of languages, mathematics and technical areas. Future studies should further examine the influence of implicit theories on the learning behavior of gifted students. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Gifted and Talented and Creativity Research)
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251 KiB  
Article
Fostering Creativity in the Classroom for High Ability Students: Context Does Matter
by Liang See Tan, Shu Shing Lee, Letchmi Devi Ponnusamy, Elizabeth Ruilin Koh and Keith Chiu Kian Tan
Educ. Sci. 2016, 6(4), 36; https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci6040036 - 9 Nov 2016
Cited by 16 | Viewed by 9652
Abstract
Researchers have argued for the importance of the classroom context in developing students’ creative potential. However, the emphasis on a performative learning culture in the classroom does not favour creativity. Thus, how creative potential can be realised as one of the educational goals [...] Read more.
Researchers have argued for the importance of the classroom context in developing students’ creative potential. However, the emphasis on a performative learning culture in the classroom does not favour creativity. Thus, how creative potential can be realised as one of the educational goals in the classrooms remains a key question. This study measured creativity across three secondary schools using the Wallach-Kogan Creative Thinking Test (WKCT). A total of 283 students enrolled in the Express programme and 290 students enrolled in the Integrated Programme (IP) volunteered in the study. The same cohort of students took the 38-item WKCT twice; once at the beginning of Secondary One and then at the end of Secondary Three. Four aspects of creativity, namely fluency, flexibility, unusualness, and uniqueness, were investigated. Our analyses showed that (i) IP students showed a greater increase in scores over time when compared to Express students; (ii) when Programme and PSLE (Primary School Leaving Examination) were used to predict creativity scores in a multiple regression, the predictive power of Programme increased from Secondary 1 to Secondary 3 while that of PSLE decreased; and (iii) flexibility scores were more resistant to change than fluency scores. These findings suggest that the classroom context matters and that the removal of high-stakes examination can provide room for the development of creative potential. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Gifted and Talented and Creativity Research)
219 KiB  
Article
Slow Shift—Developing Provisions for Talented Students in Scandinavian Higher Education
by Marca Wolfensberger and Maarten Hogenstijn
Educ. Sci. 2016, 6(3), 31; https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci6030031 - 10 Sep 2016
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 6199
Abstract
For decades, Scandinavian culture effectively prohibited the development of special provisions for talented students in higher education. However, in recent years, a cultural shift has gradually made more room for excellence and talent development in the national discourses. This paper analyzes the climate [...] Read more.
For decades, Scandinavian culture effectively prohibited the development of special provisions for talented students in higher education. However, in recent years, a cultural shift has gradually made more room for excellence and talent development in the national discourses. This paper analyzes the climate for talent development in Denmark, Sweden, and Norway. Following a first inventory of honors programs in Scandinavian higher education in which the only programs were found in Denmark, 10 experts were interviewed to analyze their national situation and reflect on the leading role of Denmark. In this country, external incentives, focus on quality, pioneers, and an open atmosphere were found to produce a culture more appreciative of excellence over the last decade. Starting from the Danish experience, the situation in Norway and Sweden is analyzed, showing that the combination of factors leading to change in Denmark is not yet present here. Lessons for other countries are highlighted, notably the importance of sharing information and exchanging knowledge at an international level. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Gifted and Talented and Creativity Research)
266 KiB  
Article
Perfectionism, Coping, and Underachievement in Gifted Adolescents: Avoidance vs. Approach Orientations
by Emily Mofield, Megan Parker Peters and Sumita Chakraborti-Ghosh
Educ. Sci. 2016, 6(3), 21; https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci6030021 - 19 Jul 2016
Cited by 24 | Viewed by 17843
Abstract
Perfectionism can influence how one approaches challenges and deals with setbacks, and, consequently, can inhibit or facilitate achievement. The present study (1) explored the relationship between Frost’s six dimensions of perfectionism and five types of coping strategies; (2) examined how dimensions of perfectionism [...] Read more.
Perfectionism can influence how one approaches challenges and deals with setbacks, and, consequently, can inhibit or facilitate achievement. The present study (1) explored the relationship between Frost’s six dimensions of perfectionism and five types of coping strategies; (2) examined how dimensions of perfectionism predict coping in response to academic stress; and (3) investigated differences between gifted underachievers and other gifted students on perfectionism and coping among 130 American gifted students in grades 6–8. Results of stepwise regression models revealed approach coping was predicted by adaptive perfectionism (Positive Strivings-notably Organization), whereas avoidance coping (Internalizing, Externalizing, and Distancing) was predicted by various combined models. Gifted underachievers displayed lower Positive Strivings perfectionism scores and lower positive coping when compared to achievers. This information is helpful when considering ways to guide gifted students to high levels of academic achievement while utilizing adaptive approaches. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Gifted and Talented and Creativity Research)
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