Imagine the Future of Higher Education: Challenges and Opportunities for Teaching and Learning

A special issue of Education Sciences (ISSN 2227-7102). This special issue belongs to the section "Higher Education".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 June 2024 | Viewed by 4764

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
SDA Bocconi School of Management, Bocconi University, 20100 Milano, MI, Italy
Interests: blended educational models; learning styles; effective design of online and blended learning experiences

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
SDA Bocconi School of Management, Bocconi University, 20100 Milano, MI, Italy
Interests: learning and development; learning styles; generational differences; creativity in teams

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The impact of education on our lives in shaping beliefs, intentions, behaviors and, in general, our understanding of social phenomena is very evident. Consequently, the quality of educational processes must be at its best, anytime and in any context. As stated by sustainable development goal number four, the concept of quality of education relates to the capacity of education to “ensure inclusive and equitable quality education and promote lifelong learning opportunities for all”. Within that context, every educational system plays a pivotal role. This Special Issue intends to focus on the higher education (HE) level. Many changes have occurred at this level, particularly in the last three years. Some of these changes have strongly facilitated the “openness to explore new ways to make education happen” both in HE and at individuals’ levels as well. This exploration stage represents a kind of unique opportunity for widely rethinking what our higher education will look like in the near future. This cannot be missed. There are many drivers and variables to consider when rethinking the entire educational system, e.g., discussing how to lead and drive learning and teaching innovations within higher education institutions, redefining educational models, getting ready for embracing the continuous technological evolution, fostering innovations, the lifelong learning process of faculty and staff members and the role of students’ learning styles and approaches.

Thus, this Special Issue intends to bring together a set of high-quality contributions to figure out the future of higher education through different lenses of analysis: pedagogical, innovation management, technological and organizational. We would like to include perspectives from multiple stakeholders, such as students, faculty members, staff and administrators of HEIs, policy makers, national and international educational agencies and institutions.

We encourage scholars to submit both qualitative and quantitative contributions based on research projects already completed or still in progress. Interdisciplinarity is more than welcome.

Given the above, this Special Issue welcomes articles examining topics such as, although not exclusively:

  • Facing the intergenerational learning differences of HE students;
  • Developing new skills for the job market and better integrating with the job market players;
  • Motivating and facilitating the continuous development process of faculty members;
  • Designing high-value educational experiences;
  • Fostering innovations within, and outside, higher education institutions;
  • Fostering partnerships with multiple stakeholders outside HE institutions to develop richer educational experiences
  • Sharing best practices oriented towards the creation of new learning contexts and environments;
  • Measuring the impact of learning experiences at different levels;
  • Assessing the effectiveness of different learning models and methods for different targets.

Prof. Dr. Leonardo Caporarello
Dr. Beatrice Manzoni
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a double-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Education Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • future of education
  • innovative learning
  • new educational models
  • higher education institutions

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

20 pages, 346 KiB  
Article
Development of Essential Competences for the Success of Inclusive Quality Teaching–Learning Processes in Higher Education
by Eduardo García-Toledano, Andrea Gracia-Zomeño, Ángel Luis González-Olivares and Ascensión Palomares-Ruiz
Educ. Sci. 2023, 13(12), 1243; https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci13121243 - 16 Dec 2023
Viewed by 877
Abstract
Currently, the development of key competences has become a fundamental priority to ensure the success of inclusive quality teaching–learning processes at all levels of education. This research proposes a quantitative observational study that involved 446 Spanish, Chilean and Mexican individuals, using the INNOVAPRENDE [...] Read more.
Currently, the development of key competences has become a fundamental priority to ensure the success of inclusive quality teaching–learning processes at all levels of education. This research proposes a quantitative observational study that involved 446 Spanish, Chilean and Mexican individuals, using the INNOVAPRENDE questionnaire. Education is fundamental to provide citizens with the skills inside and outside the classroom. For this reason, the research focuses on the teachers’ perception of university students’ skills to develop Personal, Social and Learning to Learn (PSLL) competence: initiating learning, managing time, managing information and managing self-regulated learning. It was found that women (vs. men), older participants (vs. younger participants) and participants with 16–25 years of experience (vs. those with 0–5 years of experience) perceive that university students have greater knowledge and skills to deploy PSLL. The conclusion highlights the importance of teacher guidance and support, as well as expectations in relation to learners’ development of the skills that make up PSLL. Full article
16 pages, 319 KiB  
Article
Purpose in Life in Higher Education: Is There a Role for Service-Learning?
by Luísa Mota Ribeiro, Alexandra Doroftei, Francisca Miranda, Carmo Themudo, Paulo Dias, Ricardo Peixoto, Ana Oliveira, Maria Correia, Pilar Aramburuzabala, Pedro Rosário and Robert G. Bringle
Educ. Sci. 2023, 13(12), 1170; https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci13121170 - 22 Nov 2023
Viewed by 1290
Abstract
The current study analyzed university students’ purpose in life in the context of service-learning (SL) courses developed in a university in Portugal. Briefly, 112 graduation and master students, from different areas, involved in 15 SL courses (82 female; 73.2%; age ranging from 18 [...] Read more.
The current study analyzed university students’ purpose in life in the context of service-learning (SL) courses developed in a university in Portugal. Briefly, 112 graduation and master students, from different areas, involved in 15 SL courses (82 female; 73.2%; age ranging from 18 to 51; M = 23; SD = 6.51) participated in this study. Questionnaires included an open-ended question about students’ purpose in life. Four closed-ended questions were included to understand student’s perceptions of change in their purpose in life arising from the SL courses and other perceptions about their SL course. Qualitative data were analyzed via content analysis with NVivo. Results indicated that students’ purpose in life ranged from social-related goals, such as helping or caring for others, to personal-related goals, including personal growth and well-being. Most of the students (71.4%) reported that their purpose in life changed moderately or a lot after participating in a SL course. Findings are discussed in light of the literature, identifying implications for the development of SL courses in higher education, considering the contribution of this pedagogic methodology to the definition and reconfiguration of young people’s purpose in life. Full article
16 pages, 943 KiB  
Article
Courage, Honesty, and Evaluation in the Apprehensive University
by John M. LaVelle, Kathleen Doll and Heidi Barajas
Educ. Sci. 2023, 13(11), 1157; https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci13111157 - 19 Nov 2023
Viewed by 871
Abstract
A consistent question in education is how to evaluate the degree to which universities and their programs are meeting the claims they make on their webpages and other materials, which entice students and faculty alike to join their collegiate community. Misalignments between what [...] Read more.
A consistent question in education is how to evaluate the degree to which universities and their programs are meeting the claims they make on their webpages and other materials, which entice students and faculty alike to join their collegiate community. Misalignments between what is promised and what is provided harm all community members but have disproportionate effects on students of color. It is therefore an ethical imperative for the higher education sector to undertake system wide evaluations because of the ever-rising financial and emotional costs of graduate education. For educators and administrators alike, this means systematically interrogating data to identify unseen patterns, challenge assumptions, and ask both critical and highly uncomfortable questions; for educators, this may include a truthful assessment of our own practices and assumptions. We propose drawing from the field of program evaluation and using theory-driven evaluation as a specific framework to understand graduate education process and outcomes. This conceptual paper links together existing literatures and is augmented by the authors’ reflection and dialogue about their experiences designing and implementing graduate education across several institutions. We end with a call for courage and honesty in carefully evaluating graduate education for the betterment of all students, faculty, and administrators. Full article
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16 pages, 2796 KiB  
Article
Enhancing Collaborative Learning in Higher Education through Podcast Production: An Experiential Approach with Anthropology and Tourism Students
by Isabel González Enríquez, María Soledad Cutuli and Olga Inmaculada Mancha Cáceres
Educ. Sci. 2023, 13(9), 898; https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci13090898 - 06 Sep 2023
Viewed by 1141
Abstract
The podcast in higher education is becoming widespread as a pedagogical tool that empowers students to take ownership of their own learning. In this article, we analyze a didactic experience carried out with undergraduate students at the Complutense University of Madrid and reflect [...] Read more.
The podcast in higher education is becoming widespread as a pedagogical tool that empowers students to take ownership of their own learning. In this article, we analyze a didactic experience carried out with undergraduate students at the Complutense University of Madrid and reflect on its potential for the development of curriculum content and student competencies. Using both quantitative and qualitative anthropological methodologies, we documented the process of podcast creation of undergraduate students by comparing their learning outcomes with those of students who received podcasts only as subject materials but did not engage in any creative process. Data from participant observation were supplemented with questionnaires administered to the same groups of students. The main findings indicate that the use of podcasts enhances the motivation and involvement of students in the learning process, helping them to relate in a meaningful way and to better understand theoretical content. Full article
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