Team Teaching: A Powerful Strategy?

A special issue of Education Sciences (ISSN 2227-7102). This special issue belongs to the section "Teacher Education".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 March 2024) | Viewed by 8966

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Department of Educational Studies, Ghent University, Henri Dunantlaan 2, B9000 Gent, Belgium
Interests: teacher education; curriculum studies; educational technologies; educational technologies systems; testing and evaluation; pedagogies
1. Department of Educational Studies, Ghent University, Henri Dunantlaan 2, B-9000 Ghent, Belgium
2. Antwerp School of Education, Faculty of Social Sciences, University of Antwerp, Venusstraat 35, B-2000 Antwerp, Belgium
Interests: teacher education; professional development; team teaching; practitioner research

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Guest Editor
Antwerp School of Education, Faculty of Social Sciences, University of Antwerp, Venusstraat 35, B-2000 Antwerp, Belgium
Interests: teacher education; team teaching; professional development; foreign language education

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Guest Editor
Antwerp School of Education, Faculty of Social Sciences, University of Antwerp, Venusstraat 35, B-2000 Antwerp, Belgium
Interests: teacher education; professional development; inclusive education; team teaching; classroom management

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Do you believe that team teaching is effective in helping students to learn? The often-made assumption that ‘team teaching is the most appropriate mode of delivery of education courses’ suggests an affirmative answer to this question. Equally, the literature on team teaching (also referred to with synonyms such as co-teaching, cooperative teaching, and collaborative teaching) in general offers a positive appraisal of team teaching.

Despite its overall attractiveness, the teaching profession often continues to be typified by a highly individual character where individual teachers take sole responsibility for their classes, with little or no cooperation with their colleagues. This means that teachers are daily confronted with and must respond individually to challenges as societal developments, such as the growing heterogeneity of the student population, educational reforms and innovations, early and unqualified school leaving, reality shock and high attrition rates of (beginning) teachers. Researchers, schools, and policymakers often put team teaching forward as a tangible answer. Team teaching is a collaborative teaching approach where two or more teachers work together to plan, deliver, and evaluate lessons for a group of students. This teaching approach has been shown to be beneficial for both students and teachers. On the one hand, it provides students with a range of perspectives and approaches to learning. On the other hand, it helps teachers to collaborate, share expertise, support each other, learn collaboratively, and enhance their own competencies to deal with these challenges.

However, if ‘improving teaching for all students is the foundation for the decision to team teach’, then further empirical evidence on this topic is urgently needed. In this respect, and rather surprising, empirical evidence on team teaching is rather limited. As such, the aim of this Special Issue is to collect cutting-edge research on team teaching, its implementation and its effects on learners, students, and teachers.

The aim of this Special Issue is to provide a platform for educational researchers to share their knowledge and empirical studies related to team teaching. In this Special Issue, original research articles and reviews are welcome. Research areas may include (but are not limited to) the following:

  • The benefits and challenges of team teaching
  • The impact of team teaching on student outcomes
  • The impact of team teaching on teacher outcomes
  • Evidence-based trajectories for team teaching implementation and evaluation
  • Professional development to educate and train teachers to team teach
  • The role of leadership in promoting and supporting team teaching
  • Cultural and contextual factors that impact team teaching
  • Process implementation of team teaching in compulsory education

We look forward to receiving your contributions. We welcome quantitative, qualitative, and mixed-method research.

Prof. Dr. Ruben Vanderlinde
Dr. Hanne Tack
Prof. Dr. Mathea Simons
Prof. Dr. Elke Struyf
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • teamteaching
  • co-teaching
  • collaborative teaching
  • primary education
  • secondary education
  • compulsory education
  • higher education
  • teacher education
  • education
  • professional development

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Research

21 pages, 321 KiB  
Article
Co-Teaching Implementation: How Do School Leaders Support Teachers?
by Erin M. McTigue, Aslaug F. Gourvennec, Oddny Judith Solheim and Maria Therese Jensen
Educ. Sci. 2023, 13(12), 1197; https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci13121197 - 29 Nov 2023
Viewed by 1539
Abstract
School leaders play a pivotal role in fostering change and improvement, including via teacher-led interventions, such as co-teaching. Leaders’ vision and support create the conditions for teachers to maximize the effectiveness of school interventions. However, there is limited understanding of how school leaders [...] Read more.
School leaders play a pivotal role in fostering change and improvement, including via teacher-led interventions, such as co-teaching. Leaders’ vision and support create the conditions for teachers to maximize the effectiveness of school interventions. However, there is limited understanding of how school leaders provide support for the intervention of co-teaching. This gap in knowledge is crucial because co-teaching has the potential to be transformative, but teachers must actively drive pedagogical changes. We conducted a mixed-methods study involving 150 Norwegian elementary schools participating in a multi-year co-teaching initiative for literacy instruction. We collected data through open and closed survey questions, inquiring about school leaders’ beliefs and support practices regarding co-teaching. Our descriptive analysis examined school leaders’ practices and explored potential associations with their epistemological perspectives. Our findings indicate that leaders who approach co-teaching with cautious optimism tend to provide more thoughtful support compared to those who are overly optimistic and may underestimate implementation challenges. Moreover, most leaders prioritize structural support elements while potentially overlooking psychological and emotional support practices aligned with self-determination theory (SDT). We conclude with practical recommendations for school leaders to offer support to teachers that are grounded in the principles of SDT and organized according to implementation phases. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Team Teaching: A Powerful Strategy?)
20 pages, 501 KiB  
Article
Accounting Students in the Role of Equal-Status Team Teacher for the Purpose of Knowledge and Competency Development
by Marchantia Pollock, Stephen A. Coetzee and Astrid Schmulian
Educ. Sci. 2023, 13(11), 1134; https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci13111134 - 13 Nov 2023
Viewed by 896
Abstract
This study investigates the impact of engaging accounting students in a team-teaching role on their knowledge and competency development in a higher education setting. The research quantifies the knowledge gains from this learning-by-team-teaching intervention and explores students’ experiences with this intervention through survey [...] Read more.
This study investigates the impact of engaging accounting students in a team-teaching role on their knowledge and competency development in a higher education setting. The research quantifies the knowledge gains from this learning-by-team-teaching intervention and explores students’ experiences with this intervention through survey data. The findings suggest that engaging students in a team-teaching role, specifically a sequential equal-status team-teaching role incorporating interactive teaching styles, significantly enhances knowledge development, particularly among lower-performing students. Students reported a largely positive experience across all performance levels, attributing their growth to improved knowledge, teamwork, and communication skills provided by the intervention. The study recognizes the benefits derived from the team-based design of the intervention, such as enhanced social constructivist knowledge development. Overall, this study contributes to the existing body of knowledge on learning-by-teaching strategies. It emphasizes the potential of engaging students in a team-teaching role to enhance their academic performance and the development of key professional competencies. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Team Teaching: A Powerful Strategy?)
34 pages, 6717 KiB  
Article
Impact of Team Teaching on Student Teachers’ Professional Identity: A Bayesian Approach
by Loan De Backer, Wouter Schelfhout, Mathea Simons, Ellen Vandervieren and Jose Rivera Espejo
Educ. Sci. 2023, 13(11), 1087; https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci13111087 - 27 Oct 2023
Viewed by 1844
Abstract
Workplace learning in teacher education is essential for creating and recreating the professional identity of student teachers. Innovative interventions, such as team teaching between student teachers and mentors at the workplace, are assumed to facilitate learning to teach. This experimental study provides valuable [...] Read more.
Workplace learning in teacher education is essential for creating and recreating the professional identity of student teachers. Innovative interventions, such as team teaching between student teachers and mentors at the workplace, are assumed to facilitate learning to teach. This experimental study provides valuable insight into the impact of team teaching on student teachers’ professional identity by implementing distinct student teaching formats: team teaching (A1intervention), team teaching with support (A2intervention), and traditional teaching (Control intervention). In this study, professional identity is understood as a multidimensional concept that consists of six components: student teachers’ learning and regulation activities, reflective thinking, teacher efficacy, beliefs about learning and teaching, motivation, and collaborative activities. A total of 464 student teachers from a Flemish College of Education were randomly assigned to one of the three student teaching formats. The overall findings of Bayesian structural equation modeling reveal significant impacts of team teaching with support compared to both team teaching and traditional teaching as well as a significant impact of team teaching over traditional teaching on three crucial components of student teachers’ professional identity, i.e., their learning and regulation activities, reflective thinking, and motivation. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Team Teaching: A Powerful Strategy?)
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19 pages, 330 KiB  
Article
Teaching in a Shared Classroom: Unveiling the Effective Teaching Behavior of Beginning Team Teaching Teams Using a Qualitative Approach
by Dries Mariën, Ruben Vanderlinde and Elke Struyf
Educ. Sci. 2023, 13(11), 1075; https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci13111075 - 25 Oct 2023
Viewed by 1399
Abstract
This study aims to gain insight into the experiences of beginning team teaching teams and the dimensions of effective teaching behavior that are perceived as clear added value in their pedagogical practices. Sixteen beginning team teaching teams from twelve different elementary schools participated [...] Read more.
This study aims to gain insight into the experiences of beginning team teaching teams and the dimensions of effective teaching behavior that are perceived as clear added value in their pedagogical practices. Sixteen beginning team teaching teams from twelve different elementary schools participated in team interviews. The more complex dimensions of effective teaching behavior, based on the International Comparative Analysis of Learning and Teaching (ICALT) framework, such as adaptive teaching and activating learning, were perceived as clear added value in their team teaching practices. Meanwhile, the more basic teaching dimensions—including efficient classroom management, providing clear instruction, and creating a safe and stimulating learning climate—were reported to a lesser extent. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Team Teaching: A Powerful Strategy?)
20 pages, 635 KiB  
Article
Collaboration and Shared Responsibility in Team Teaching: A Large-Scale Survey Study
by Aron Decuyper, Hanne Tack, Bénédicte Vanblaere, Mathea Simons and Ruben Vanderlinde
Educ. Sci. 2023, 13(9), 896; https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci13090896 - 05 Sep 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 2037
Abstract
The practice of team teaching—how teachers deliver team teaching in the classroom—substantially determines its effect. The collaboration between the teachers and the level of shared responsibility between them are two important dimensions of the team teaching practice. To date, no instrument exists to [...] Read more.
The practice of team teaching—how teachers deliver team teaching in the classroom—substantially determines its effect. The collaboration between the teachers and the level of shared responsibility between them are two important dimensions of the team teaching practice. To date, no instrument exists to measure these dimensions. However, in view of empirical research within the context of team teaching, such an instrument is important. Therefore, the Collaboration and Shared Responsibility in Team Teaching (CSTT) scale is developed, making it possible to assess these two important dimensions. The CSTT scale was used in a large-scale cross-sectional survey study (n = 555). Next to a validation of the scale, this study provides empirical evidence on the differences between groups of teachers regarding (a) teaching experience, (b) education type, and (c) frequency of team teaching. Results show that teachers overall report high scores on both dimensions. Further, this study indicates that there are no significant differences between the groups based on (a) teaching experience and (b) education type for both collaboration and shared responsibility. There are, however, significant differences between groups in terms of the (c) frequency of team teaching. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Team Teaching: A Powerful Strategy?)
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