Making Our Way: Rethinking and Disrupting Teacher Education

A special issue of Education Sciences (ISSN 2227-7102). This special issue belongs to the section "Teacher Education".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (15 February 2024) | Viewed by 5257

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Department of Urban Education, Rutgers University-Newark, 110 Warren Street, 1st Floor, Newark, NJ 07102, USA
Interests: retention and recruitment of teachers of color; diversity, equity, and inclusion practices of K-12 urban schools; minority-serving institutions and teacher education

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Urban Education, Rutgers University-Newark, 110 Warren Street, 1st Floor, Newark, NJ 07102, USA
Interests: teacher preparation; early literacy; urban schooling

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The on-going COVID-19 pandemic, movements for racial and disability justice, protests against police brutality and mass incarceration, global warming, and the overall crisis climate have necessitated a reckoning in educational spaces, highlighting their entrenched practices of supremacy and control. Current movements are re-imaging education for the public good, working toward reparative futures, justice, and abolition. This momentum is essential to our collective well-being, sense of place, and aspirational capital, and will help to establish life-affirming educational spaces and opportunities for all.

This Special Issue, Making Our Way: Rethinking and Disrupting Teacher Education, seeks writings, research, musings, manifestos, and arts-based approaches exploring how equity and justice (as a process, goal, and action) have been enacted in PreK-20 learning spaces. We seek discussions of educational approaches that challenge systems, expand expertise, and think outside the box. This Special Issue intends to expand the definitions of mastery and intellect in educational and/or schooling spaces and embrace the concepts of local, embodied, and community knowledge.

In this Special Issue, we broadly define teacher education as any influence on PreK-20 schooling spaces and learning, traditional and/or alternative educational settings, and community-based learning arenas. With this broad definition, we seek to reimagine the definition of teacher and teaching and the overall educational process to center under-represented knowledge, voices, and experiences in scholarship.

Reviews, essays, empirical studies, and arts-based approaches exploring, challenging, and pushing the ideas of equity and diversity in teacher education are welcome. Potential topics may include (but are not limited to):

  • Movements in racial and disability justice that are critical to teacher education.
  • Access to schooling for justice-impacted and formerly incarcerated people and communities.
  • PreK-12 or higher education (13-20) spaces that serve as, with, and for the public good.
  • Traditional or alternative teacher training programs centering and operating with equity and justice.
  • The creation of new, more expansive definitions of mastery, expertise, and knowledge in PreK-20 settings.
  • Transformative, abolitionist methods in instruction that support and center multiply-minoritized learners.
  • Disruptions to practices of meritocracy in PreK-12 and higher education.

We look forward to receiving your contributions.

Dr. Lynnette Mawhinney
Dr. Jhanae Wingfield
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a double-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Education Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • equity
  • justice-oriented education
  • teacher education
  • K-20 education
  • local and community knowledge

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Research

27 pages, 845 KiB  
Article
The Effects of Attending High Individual and Collective Teacher Efficacy Schools on Ninth Grade On-Track
by Vandeen A. Campbell, Meril Antony, Jessica Zulawski and Kristen Foley
Educ. Sci. 2024, 14(5), 546; https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci14050546 - 17 May 2024
Viewed by 334
Abstract
Ninth grade on-track is predictive of high school graduation, more than race, socio-economic status, and prior achievement combined. Although initiatives characterized by an intense focus on the ninth-grade year are being increasingly implemented, research has not fully documented and tested mechanisms linked to [...] Read more.
Ninth grade on-track is predictive of high school graduation, more than race, socio-economic status, and prior achievement combined. Although initiatives characterized by an intense focus on the ninth-grade year are being increasingly implemented, research has not fully documented and tested mechanisms linked to improved outcomes. Using survey and transcript-level data and causal mediation analysis, this study tests the effects of students attending high teacher efficacy (self and collective—TSE and CTE) schools on ninth grade on-track in an urban school district in a northeast state in the United States. It further examines the extent to which ambitious instructional practices, defined as culturally relevant and transformative pedagogy, mediate the effects of TSE on ninth grade on-track and how levels of supportive school culture moderate these relationships. The findings indicate that urban ninth-graders attending schools with high TSE and CTE are more likely to be on track at the end of ninth grade. Additionally, the direct effect of students attending a school with high TSE was mediated by the level of ambitious instruction. We discuss implications for teacher education (TE) and professional development. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Making Our Way: Rethinking and Disrupting Teacher Education)
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16 pages, 481 KiB  
Article
Culture of Interculturality, Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion (IDEI) Assessment: Lessons from a Social Justice-Based Intercultural Learning Certificate Program for Preservice Teachers
by Cherrel Miller Dyce, Katrice Hawthorne and Jamie Wire
Educ. Sci. 2024, 14(5), 482; https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci14050482 - 1 May 2024
Viewed by 769
Abstract
Despite the pillars, rubrics, and standards provided by national education organizations and accrediting bodies, many educator preparation programs (EPPs) struggle to prepare teacher candidates to engage effectively with all children across differences in an intercultural context. The ability to engage across differences is [...] Read more.
Despite the pillars, rubrics, and standards provided by national education organizations and accrediting bodies, many educator preparation programs (EPPs) struggle to prepare teacher candidates to engage effectively with all children across differences in an intercultural context. The ability to engage across differences is especially important for teacher candidates as America’s public schools are more diverse than ever. To increase teacher candidates’ knowledge skills and dispositions, we propose a theory-based program focused on interculturality, diversity, equity, and inclusion (IDEI) that aligns with professional accreditation standards and weaves in effective assessment practices. By intentionally embedding assessment activities in program development, we hope to create a culture of IDEI assessment that not only meets accreditor standards but also results in program improvements and learners’ development. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Making Our Way: Rethinking and Disrupting Teacher Education)
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20 pages, 543 KiB  
Article
Leaders’ Social and Disability Justice Drive to Cultivate Inclusive Schooling
by Chelsea P. Tracy-Bronson
Educ. Sci. 2024, 14(4), 424; https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci14040424 - 18 Apr 2024
Viewed by 1061
Abstract
The purpose of this article is to understand administrators’ personal beliefs and experiences related to inclusive education and social justice that are critical to their commitment, the leadership provided, and types of special education services that prevail in their districts. This study is [...] Read more.
The purpose of this article is to understand administrators’ personal beliefs and experiences related to inclusive education and social justice that are critical to their commitment, the leadership provided, and types of special education services that prevail in their districts. This study is embedded within a conceptual framework centered on inclusive education, and existing theoretical framings of leadership for social justice and disability studies in education. Further, it contributes to the conversation in a recent call to reimagine educational approaches in the United States that challenge systems, focus on racial and disability justice, and serve the public good. A qualitative research methodology with in-depth interviewing as the data collection method was used to understand the lived experiences and practices of seven district-level special education leaders. It specifically looks at the leaders’ drive to carry out social justice work and their overall value-based mission of socially just, equity-oriented inclusive education at the district level. It provides a research study on (1) how leaders come to carry out social justice and disability justice work in schools, (2) poignant career events that shape their justice work, and (3) their intentions to prepare under-represented and traditionally marginalized students to engage in society. The overall premise is that since district-level leaders are vital in shaping public schooling spaces, understanding their social and disability justice grounding is critical to disrupt marginalizing practices in PreK-12. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Making Our Way: Rethinking and Disrupting Teacher Education)
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18 pages, 815 KiB  
Article
Justice-Centered Reflective Practice in Teacher Education: Pedagogy as a Process of Imaginative and Hopeful Invention
by Sonia M. Rosen, Charlotte E. Jacobs, Jessica Whitelaw, Vinay R. Mallikaarjun and Frances Rust
Educ. Sci. 2024, 14(4), 376; https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci14040376 - 5 Apr 2024
Viewed by 1390
Abstract
This paper introduces justice-centered reflective practice, an approach that emerged out of our practitioner research in the Independent School Teaching Residency program. This ongoing and imperfect praxis is simultaneously a stance, a lens, a pedagogy, an orientation, and a way of understanding [...] Read more.
This paper introduces justice-centered reflective practice, an approach that emerged out of our practitioner research in the Independent School Teaching Residency program. This ongoing and imperfect praxis is simultaneously a stance, a lens, a pedagogy, an orientation, and a way of understanding and mobilizing our individual and collective identities as teacher educators. Mediated by joy, imagination, vulnerability, and uncertainty, six foundational principles guide our work: justice-centered reflective practice is (1) purposeful and systematic, (2) iterative and cyclical, (3), critically reflective, (4) agentive, (5) done in community, and (6) loving and hopeful. Here we detail these principles and illustrate how they manifest in our work as teacher educators in how we structure the program and enact our pedagogy. We seek to continue a scholarly conversation among critical teacher educators about how we enact liberatory values and aspirations in the context of institutions and policy environments that often constrain our collective work. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Making Our Way: Rethinking and Disrupting Teacher Education)
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15 pages, 2760 KiB  
Article
Unshackling Our Youth through Love and Mutual Recognition: Notes from an Undergraduate Class on School Discipline Inspired by Ta-Nehisi Coates and bell hooks
by Gene Fellner, Mark Comesañas and Tahjuan Ferrell
Educ. Sci. 2024, 14(3), 269; https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci14030269 - 5 Mar 2024
Viewed by 744
Abstract
This research essay challenges educators to embrace mutual recognition when interacting with students. Our data are the words of the young people who participated with us in one particular undergraduate class on school discipline at Rutgers University in Newark, New Jersey, in the [...] Read more.
This research essay challenges educators to embrace mutual recognition when interacting with students. Our data are the words of the young people who participated with us in one particular undergraduate class on school discipline at Rutgers University in Newark, New Jersey, in the United States in the fall of 2022. Tahjuan, who had been our student in the 7th grade in 2011, co-taught the class with us. In writing this essay and in teaching the class, we were inspired by a short passage from Ta-Nehisi Coates about the shackling young people of color endure and another, by bell hooks, that proposes mutual recognition as a teaching practice that can loosen those shackles. Most saliently, this essay is inspired by the youth we work with who, without reading either Coates or hooks, embody Coates’ experience and hooks’ wisdom. Though we invited and compensated these particular youth to join us in the class as co-teachers and participants, we believe they are broadly representative of the adolescent students we have worked with over the last 15 years in Newark. All the young people quoted in this article have reviewed what we have written and approved its publication. Tahjuan has agreed to include his name as a co-author. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Making Our Way: Rethinking and Disrupting Teacher Education)
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