Point-of-Care Ultrasonography in Critical Care and Emergency Medicine

A special issue of Diagnostics (ISSN 2075-4418). This special issue belongs to the section "Point-of-Care Diagnostics and Devices".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (15 February 2023) | Viewed by 14377

Special Issue Editor

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Point-of-care ultrasonography (POCUS) includes the acquisition, interpretation, and immediate clinical evaluation of diagnostic results performed by a physician at the patient’s bedside. Cardiac and pulmonary pathologies, the examination of abdominal organs, identification and evaluation of effusions, free fluids and air, pneumothorax, location of indwelling medical devices or any acute instability are clear and usual indications for POCUS examination of the acutely or critically ill. Easier access to portable devices combined with the extensive training of physicians lead to a revolutionary increase in its bedside use on intensive care units. The term “critical care ultrasonography” has been introduced and defined as a bedside diagnostic or guiding procedure performed and interpreted by the intensivist, consisting of general critical care ultrasonography (thoracic, abdominal, and vascular) and echocardiography (basic and advanced). The POCUS can be used as a fast and reliable diagnostic tool that narrows differential diagnosis in acute instable patients and guides emergency medical procedures. In cardiac arrest, POCUS can be immeasurably helpful in ruling out reversible causes, leading to adapted and immediate therapy.

Revolutionary use of POCUS in lung investigation, diverse laboratory tests primarily for COVID-19 diagnosis but also for the early recognition of potentially fatal complications and their prevention, is increasing and should be properly addressed. As the bedside diagnostics are rapidly emerging as an important and irreplaceable tool in the hands of intensive care physicians, the main goal of this Special Issue is to update and summarize diverse POCUS diagnostic approaches in the care of patients.

The present Special Issue on “Point-of-Care Ultrasonography in Critical Care and Emergency medicine” welcomes the submission of work related to the most recent developments of POCUS in research and practice. We invite all researchers of associated disciplines who focus on the use of bedside ultrasonography to submit original articles or reviews in their area of expertise, enhancing the multidisciplinarity of modern medicine.

Dr. Sasa Rajsic
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Diagnostics is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • point-of-care ultrasonography
  • POCUS
  • bedside approaches
  • emergency medicine
  • critical care
  • intensive care
  • acute medicine
  • resuscitation
  • echocardiography

Published Papers (2 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Review

15 pages, 1369 KiB  
Review
Point-of-Care Abdominal Ultrasonography (POCUS) on the Way to the Right and Rapid Diagnosis
by Tijana Radonjić, Maja Popović, Marija Zdravković, Igor Jovanović, Višeslav Popadić, Bogdan Crnokrak, Slobodan Klašnja, Olga Mandić, Marija Dukić and Marija Branković
Diagnostics 2022, 12(9), 2052; https://doi.org/10.3390/diagnostics12092052 - 24 Aug 2022
Cited by 10 | Viewed by 5061
Abstract
Point-of-Care ultrasound (POCUS) is based on target ultrasound that is performed wherever a patient is being treated, and by a non-radiologist directly involved in the patient’s care. It is used either for quick diagnosis or procedural guidance. Abdominal pain is one of the [...] Read more.
Point-of-Care ultrasound (POCUS) is based on target ultrasound that is performed wherever a patient is being treated, and by a non-radiologist directly involved in the patient’s care. It is used either for quick diagnosis or procedural guidance. Abdominal pain is one of the most common complaints in emergency departments, and POCUS can help in the differentiation of patients who need additional diagnostic tests or hospital treatment, which eventually reduces the overall costs of health care. POCUS has high sensitivity and specificity in abdominal pathology, it can be helpful in the evaluation of biliary, intestinal, and urinary tract, and it is especially used in trauma. Additionally, the gold standard for abdominal aortic aneurysm detection, follow up and screening is precisely this diagnostic procedure. Unfortunately, the quality of ultrasound examination can be affected by the experience of the physician performing it and the patient’s body weight. There is no doubt that POCUS is being increasingly recognized, but all motivated physicians should be provided with dedicated tutors and enough time for learning. This would certainly help to implement this diagnostic method as a routine in emergency and critical care departments, and significantly shorten the time until definitive diagnosis. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Point-of-Care Ultrasonography in Critical Care and Emergency Medicine)
Show Figures

Figure 1

17 pages, 2236 KiB  
Review
Optic Nerve Sheath Diameter Ultrasound: A Non-Invasive Approach to Evaluate Increased Intracranial Pressure in Critically Ill Pediatric Patients
by Giulia Cannata, Stefano Pezzato, Susanna Esposito and Andrea Moscatelli
Diagnostics 2022, 12(3), 767; https://doi.org/10.3390/diagnostics12030767 - 21 Mar 2022
Cited by 11 | Viewed by 8344
Abstract
Early diagnosis of increased intracranial pressure (ICP) is crucial for prompt diagnosis and treatment of intracranial hypertension in critically ill pediatric patients, preventing secondary brain damage and mortality. Although the placement of an external ventricular drain coupled to an external fluid-filled transducer remains [...] Read more.
Early diagnosis of increased intracranial pressure (ICP) is crucial for prompt diagnosis and treatment of intracranial hypertension in critically ill pediatric patients, preventing secondary brain damage and mortality. Although the placement of an external ventricular drain coupled to an external fluid-filled transducer remains the gold standard for continuous ICP monitoring, other non-invasive approaches are constantly being improved and can provide reliable estimates. The use of point-of-care ultrasound (POCUS) for the assessment of ICP has recently become widespread in pediatric emergency and critical care settings, representing a valuable extension of the physical examination. The aim of this manuscript is to review and discuss the basic principles of ultra-sound measurement of the optic nerve sheath diameter (ONSD) and summarize current evidence on its diagnostic value in pediatric patients with ICP. There is increasing evidence that POCUS measurement of the ONSD correlates with ICP, thus appearing as a useful extension of the physical examination in pediatrics, especially in emergency medicine and critical care settings for the initial non-invasive assessment of patients with suspected raised ICP. Its role could be of value even to assess the response to therapy and in the follow-up of patients with diagnosed intracranial hypertension if invasive ICP monitoring is not available. Further studies on more homogeneous and extensive study populations should be performed to establish ONSD reference ranges in the different pediatric ages and to define cut-off values in predicting elevated ICP compared to invasive ICP measurement. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Point-of-Care Ultrasonography in Critical Care and Emergency Medicine)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop