Critical Care Update: Innovations in Diagnostic & Treatment - Volume 2

A special issue of Journal of Clinical Medicine (ISSN 2077-0383). This special issue belongs to the section "Intensive Care".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (10 December 2023) | Viewed by 6997

Special Issue Editors


E-Mail
Guest Editor

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The concept of intensive care units has existed for almost 70 years, with outstanding development and progress in recent decades. Multidisciplinary care of critically ill patients has become an integral part of every modern healthcare system, ensuring improved care and reduced mortality. Easier access to care, early recognition of severe medical and surgical illnesses, advanced pre-hospital care, and organized immediate care in trauma centers have led to the increase in ICU patients. Moreover, due to the continuous research conducted by scholars and the fast development of technologies in the field of critical care, clinicians are faced with the need for continuous education. The main goal of this Special Issue is to summarize and collect the newest information on epidemiology, pathophysiology, diagnostics, monitoring, therapeutic strategies, and patient-related outcomes in critical care.

The present second volume of the very successful Special Issue entitled “Critical Care Update: Innovations in Diagnostic and Treatment” welcomes the submission of work related to the most recent developments in experimental and clinical intensive care and emergency medicine research and practice that addresses innovative therapeutic and diagnostic strategies in the care of the critically ill. We invite all researchers of associated disciplines who focus on the care of acutely ill patients to submit original articles or reviews in their area of expertise, enhancing the multi-disciplinarity of modern critical care.

Dr. Sasa Rajsic
Dr. Benedikt Treml
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Journal of Clinical Medicine is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • intensive care
  • ICU
  • critical care
  • acute care
  • emergency medicine
  • multidisciplinary care
  • trauma
  • sepsis
  • COVID-19
  • acute respiratory distress syndrome
  • ARDS
  • extracorporeal life support
  • ECMO
  • acute renal failure
  • mechanical ventilation
  • in-hospital emergencies management

Published Papers (2 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Review

11 pages, 1002 KiB  
Review
Weaning from Kidney Replacement Therapy in the Critically Ill Patient with Acute Kidney Injury
by Kada Klouche, Vincent Brunot, Romaric Larcher and Alexandre Lautrette
J. Clin. Med. 2024, 13(2), 579; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm13020579 - 19 Jan 2024
Viewed by 3381
Abstract
Around 10% of critically ill patients suffer acute kidney injury (AKI) requiring kidney replacement therapy (KRT), with a mortality rate approaching 50%. Although most survivors achieve sufficient renal recovery to be weaned from KRT, there are no recognized guidelines on the optimal period [...] Read more.
Around 10% of critically ill patients suffer acute kidney injury (AKI) requiring kidney replacement therapy (KRT), with a mortality rate approaching 50%. Although most survivors achieve sufficient renal recovery to be weaned from KRT, there are no recognized guidelines on the optimal period for weaning from KRT. A systematic review was conducted using a peer-reviewed strategy, combining themes of KRT (intermittent hemodialysis, CKRT: continuous veno-venous hemo/dialysis/filtration/diafiltration, sustained low-efficiency dialysis/filtration), factors predictive of successful weaning (defined as a prolonged period without new KRT) and patient outcomes. Our research resulted in studies, all observational, describing clinical and biological parameters predictive of successful weaning from KRT. Urine output prior to KRT cessation is the most studied variable and the most widely used in practice. Other predictive factors, such as urinary urea and creatinine and new urinary and serum renal biomarkers, including cystatin C and neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL), were also analyzed in the light of recent studies. This review presents the rationale for early weaning from KRT, the parameters that can guide it, and its practical modalities. Once the patient’s clinical condition has stabilized and volume status optimized, a diuresis greater than 500 mL/day should prompt the intensivist to consider weaning. Urinary parameters could be useful in predicting weaning success but have yet to be validated. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

20 pages, 615 KiB  
Review
Human Albumin Infusion in Critically Ill and Perioperative Patients: Narrative Rapid Review of Meta-Analyses from the Last Five Years
by Christian J. Wiedermann
J. Clin. Med. 2023, 12(18), 5919; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm12185919 - 12 Sep 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 3182
Abstract
Background: Human albumin, a vital plasma protein with diverse molecular properties, has garnered interest for its therapeutic potential in various diseases, including critical illnesses. However, the efficacy of albumin infusion in critical care and its associated complications remains controversial. To address this, a [...] Read more.
Background: Human albumin, a vital plasma protein with diverse molecular properties, has garnered interest for its therapeutic potential in various diseases, including critical illnesses. However, the efficacy of albumin infusion in critical care and its associated complications remains controversial. To address this, a review of recent meta-analyses was conducted to summarize the evidence pertaining to albumin use in critical illness. Methods: Adhering to the rapid review approach, designed to provide a concise synthesis of existing evidence within a short timeframe, relevant meta-analyses published in the last five years were identified and analyzed. PubMed, Embase, and Cochrane databases of systematic reviews were searched using pre-defined search terms. Eligible studies included meta-analyses examining the association between albumin infusion and outcomes in critically ill and perioperative patients. Results: Twelve meta-analyses were included in the review, covering diverse critical illnesses and perioperative scenarios such as sepsis, cardiothoracic surgery, and acute brain injury. The analyses revealed varying levels of evidence for the effects of albumin use on different outcomes, ranging from no significant associations to suggestive and convincing. Conclusions: Albumin infusion stabilizes hemodynamic resuscitation endpoints, improves diuretic resistance, and has the potential to prevent hypotensive episodes during mechanical ventilation in hypoalbuminemic patients and improve the survival of patients with septic shock. However, caution is warranted due to the methodological limitations of the included studies. Further high-quality research is needed to validate these findings and inform clinical decision-making regarding albumin use in critical care. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop