Data Science in Invertebrate

A special issue of Data (ISSN 2306-5729). This special issue belongs to the section "Computational Biology, Bioinformatics, and Biomedical Data Science".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 1 March 2024 | Viewed by 4476

Special Issue Editors

Joint Directorate of the Mordovia State Nature Reserve and National Park “Smolny”, 30 Krasnaya Str., 430005 Saransk, Republic of Mordovia, Russia
Interests: biodiversity conservation; insects; reptiles; amphibia; protected areas; nature conservation
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
1. Laboratory of Plant Ecophysiology and Experimental Phytoecology of the Institute of Environmental and Agricultural Biology (X-BIO), Tyumen State University, Volodarskogo Street, 6, Tyumen, 625003 Tyumen Region, Russia
2. Joint Directorate of the Mordovia State Nature Reserve and National Park “Smolny” (Scientific Department), Krasnaya Street, 30, Saransk, 430005 Saransk, Republic of Mordovia, Russia
Interests: plant diversity; threatened plants; invasive alien plants; IUCN Red List; biodiversity & conservation; plant conservation
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Despite considerable efforts to study the biodiversity on the planet, many data have not yet been published. This makes it difficult to analyze the distribution of species, analyze the settlement of invasive species, analyze the variability in ranges and species abundance, analyze the alpha diversity of regions, and identify “biodiversity hotspots". Datasets, databases, networks, and information infrastructures have been used in recent years to understand the distributions of species. This Special Issue is a great opportunity to publish a “Data Descriptor”, to provide a description of research datasets (one dataset per article). Data documents provide recognition of these efforts through peer-reviewed publications.

Dr. Alexander B. Ruchin
Dr. Anatoliy A. Khapugin
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Data is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Published Papers (3 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Other

11 pages, 2082 KiB  
Data Descriptor
Biodiversity of Terrestrial Testate Amoebae in Western Siberia Lowland Peatlands
Data 2023, 8(11), 173; https://doi.org/10.3390/data8110173 - 17 Nov 2023
Viewed by 1283
Abstract
Testate amoebae are unicellular eukaryotic organisms covered with an external skeleton called a shell. They are an important component of many terrestrial ecosystems, especially peatlands, where they can be preserved in peat deposits and used as a proxy of surface wetness in paleoecological [...] Read more.
Testate amoebae are unicellular eukaryotic organisms covered with an external skeleton called a shell. They are an important component of many terrestrial ecosystems, especially peatlands, where they can be preserved in peat deposits and used as a proxy of surface wetness in paleoecological reconstructions. Here, we represent a database from a vast but poorly studied region of the Western Siberia Lowland containing information on TA occurrences in relation to substrate moisture and WTD. The dataset includes 88 species from 32 genera, with 2181 incidences and 21,562 counted individuals. All samples were collected in oligotrophic peatlands and prepared using the method of wet sieving with a subsequent sedimentation of aqueous suspensions. This database contributes to the understanding of the distribution of testate amoebae and can be further used in large-scale investigations. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Data Science in Invertebrate)
Show Figures

Figure 1

8 pages, 1658 KiB  
Data Descriptor
Testate Amoebae (Amphitremida, Arcellinida, Euglyphida) in Sphagnum Bogs: The Dataset from Eastern Fennoscandia
Data 2023, 8(11), 172; https://doi.org/10.3390/data8110172 - 15 Nov 2023
Viewed by 1460
Abstract
The paper describes a dataset, comprising 236 surface moss samples and 143 testate amoeba taxa. The samples were collected in 11 Sphagnum-dominated bogs during frost-free seasons of 2004, 2007, 2009, 2017, and 2022. For the whole dataset, the sampling effort was sufficient [...] Read more.
The paper describes a dataset, comprising 236 surface moss samples and 143 testate amoeba taxa. The samples were collected in 11 Sphagnum-dominated bogs during frost-free seasons of 2004, 2007, 2009, 2017, and 2022. For the whole dataset, the sampling effort was sufficient in terms of observed species richness (143 species in total), though a regional species pool is deemed to be discovered incompletely (143 species is its lower 95 % confidence limit using Chao’s estimator). The local community composition demonstrated high heterogeneity in a reduced ordination space. It supports the opinion that the high versatility of bog ecosystems should be taken into account during ecological studies. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Data Science in Invertebrate)
Show Figures

Figure 1

15 pages, 1801 KiB  
Data Descriptor
Dataset: Biodiversity of Ground Beetles (Coleoptera, Carabidae) of the Republic of Mordovia (Russia)
Data 2023, 8(11), 161; https://doi.org/10.3390/data8110161 - 24 Oct 2023
Viewed by 1357
Abstract
(1) Background: Carabidae is one of the most diverse families of Coleoptera. Many species of Carabidae are sensitive to anthropogenic impacts and are indicators of their environmental state. Some species of large beetles are on the verge of extinction. The aim of this [...] Read more.
(1) Background: Carabidae is one of the most diverse families of Coleoptera. Many species of Carabidae are sensitive to anthropogenic impacts and are indicators of their environmental state. Some species of large beetles are on the verge of extinction. The aim of this research is to describe the Carabidae fauna of the Republic of Mordovia (central part of European Russia); (2) Methods: The research was carried out in April-September 1979, 1987, 2000, 2001, 2005, 2007–2022. Collections were performed using a variety of methods (light trapping, soil traps, window traps, etc.). For each observation, the coordinates of the sampling location, abundance, and dates were recorded; (3) Results: The dataset contains data on 251 species of Carabidae from 12 subfamilies and 4576 occurrences. A total of 66,378 specimens of Carabidae were studied. Another 29 species are additionally known from other publications. Also, twenty-two species were excluded from the fauna of the region, as they were determined earlier by mistake (4). Conclusions: The biodiversity of Carabidae in the Republic of Mordovia included 280 species from 12 subfamilies. Four species (Agonum scitulum, Lebia scapularis, Bembidion humerale, and Bembidion tenellum) were identified for the first time in the Republic of Mordovia. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Data Science in Invertebrate)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop