Glass/Ceramic Coatings for Biomaterials and Biomedical Applications

A special issue of Coatings (ISSN 2079-6412). This special issue belongs to the section "Ceramic Coatings and Engineering Technology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 December 2021) | Viewed by 4631

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Guest Editor
Centre for Functional and Surface Functionalised Glass, Alexander Dubcek University of Trencin, 91150 Trencin, Slovakia
Interests: ceramic composites; advanced ceramic materials; organic preceramic precursors; aluminate glasses
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Biomaterials have revolutionized the field of healthcare and opened the path to personalized treatment and therapeutic methods never thought of before their invention. Biomaterials, as they are known today, are expected to bond tightly to both hard and soft body tissues and to stimulate regeneration, self-healing, and self-repair. Various groups of materials, from metals through glass and ceramics to polymers, are used today as biomaterials, all of them possessing both advantages and limitations. Many of them suffer from inferior mechanical properties, poor corrosion resistance resulting in release of toxic ions, very fast degradation, or a limited capacity to bond with the tissue. Bioactive glasses and ceramics are the materials of choice for many applications. However, due to their poor mechanical properties, they often cannot be used alone, especially in structural applications where the load-bearing capacity is a key issue. There exist at least two options for solving the problem. One is to combine glass/ceramics with other materials to produce a composite. Another is to apply a glass/ceramic coating on a mechanically stronger and tougher substrate, modifying the surface of the implant. This way, an entirely new surface is created that confers on the biomaterial additional properties that are quite different from those of the uncoated substrate. Such coatings can improve the stability of implants, improve their bond to the surrounding tissue, protect the substrate from corrosion, or control the rate of release of therapeutic substances. This aim of this Special Issue is to give a concise overview of current research on the development, testing, and use of glass/ceramic coatings on various substrates for biomedical applications. It will cover the following topics:

  • recent developments in bioactive and hierarchical coatings on 3D porous scaffolds, joint prostheses, metallic substrates for orthopedic fixation, meshes and sutures for wound healing, ocular implants, and percutaneous devices;
  • processes for the preparation of bioactive glass/ceramic coatings, including but not limited to additive manufacturing, physical vapor deposition (PVD), chemical vapor deposition (CVD), plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PE-CVD), and sol-gel;
  • understanding the degradation mechanisms of bioactive coatings both in vitro and in vivo;
  • computer modeling and simulations to predict coating properties and performance in contact with living tissues and in simulated environments.

Prof. Dr. Dušan Galusek
Guest Editor

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Keywords

  • glass/ceramic coatings
  • bioactive coatings
  • preparation of coatings
  • degradation of coatings
  • in vivo testing

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

7 pages, 3391 KiB  
Article
A Percutaneous Catheter Solution as a Spacer for Regurgitant Heart Valve Disease
by Min-Ku Chon, Dong-Hoon Shin, Su-Jin Jung, Hyeon-Jun Park and June-Hong Kim
Coatings 2021, 11(8), 926; https://doi.org/10.3390/coatings11080926 - 02 Aug 2021
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1831
Abstract
Spacers, such as FORMA (Edwards Lifescience) or Mitraspacer, are used to treat mitral regurgitation or tricuspid regurgitations. However, they require external therapeutic liquid filler injection into the spacer device. This should be leak-tight over the time of implantation, which is a major limitation [...] Read more.
Spacers, such as FORMA (Edwards Lifescience) or Mitraspacer, are used to treat mitral regurgitation or tricuspid regurgitations. However, they require external therapeutic liquid filler injection into the spacer device. This should be leak-tight over the time of implantation, which is a major limitation in device design. Here, we propose a self-expandable spacer with a nitinol inner mesh and expanded poly (tetrafluoroethylene) (ePTFE) coating that also functions as a spacer. We designed nitinol 3D mesh templates, coated with a commercially available low and high durometer ePTFE membrane. Finally, we implanted the spacer into a swine pulmonary artery and right atrium (superior vena cava) as an intervention technique. Twenty-four swine were used, except in two cases suspected of procedural infection. The results were analyzed in the remaining 22 cases and all devices were easily delivered and had good function in self-expansion and implantation. After eight weeks, all individuals were examined for gross and pathological analysis to determine the biological safety of the device. There was no evidence of damage or other abnormalities and increased postoperative endothelialization outside of ePTFE coatings. In conclusion, this study suggests using a self-expandable spacer to complement the medical limitations of the existing filling-type spacer devices. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Glass/Ceramic Coatings for Biomaterials and Biomedical Applications)
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8 pages, 3532 KiB  
Article
Development of Adhesive, Bioactive and Antibacterial Titania Sol-Gel Coating on Titanium Substrate by Dip-Coating Technique
by Diana Horkavcová, Quentin Doubet, Gisèle Laure Lecomte-Nana, Eva Jablonská and Aleš Helebrant
Coatings 2021, 11(2), 243; https://doi.org/10.3390/coatings11020243 - 18 Feb 2021
Cited by 7 | Viewed by 2039
Abstract
The sol-gel method provides a wide variety of applications in the medical field. One of these applications is the formation of coatings on the metal implants. The coatings containing specific additive can enhance or improve the existing surface properties of the substrate. In [...] Read more.
The sol-gel method provides a wide variety of applications in the medical field. One of these applications is the formation of coatings on the metal implants. The coatings containing specific additive can enhance or improve the existing surface properties of the substrate. In this work, titania sol-gel coatings were doped with two forms of silver (AgNO3, Ag3PO4) and synthetic hydroxyapatite and applied on the titanium samples by dip-coating technique. After drying and slow firing, all coatings were characterized with scanning electron microscopy. Thin coatings were successfully prepared with excellent adhesion to the substrate (measured by ASTM D 3359-2), despite cracks. Coatings containing silver and hydroxyapatite demonstrated a 100% antibacterial effect against Escherichia coli after 24 h. The bioactivity of the coatings containing hydroxyapatite tested in modified simulated body fluid under static-dynamic conditions was confirmed by bone-like hydroxyapatite precipitation. To better understand the interaction of the coatings with simulated body fluid (SBF), changes of Ca2+ and (PO4)3− ions concentrations and pH values were studied. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Glass/Ceramic Coatings for Biomaterials and Biomedical Applications)
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