cimb-logo

Journal Browser

Journal Browser

Molecular Mechanisms and Regulation in Allergy and Immune Diseases, Immunodeficiencies

A special issue of Current Issues in Molecular Biology (ISSN 1467-3045). This special issue belongs to the section "Molecular Medicine".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 July 2024 | Viewed by 13324

Special Issue Editors

Department of Allergology, Clinical Immunology and Internal Medicine, Ludwik Rydygier Collegium Medicum in Bydgoszcz, Nicolaus Copernicus University in Toruń, ul. Ujejskiego 75, 85-168 Bydgoszcz, Poland
Interests: food additive; immunology; alergology
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Allergology, Clinical Immunology and Internal Medicine, Ludwik Rydygier Collegium Medicum in Bydgoszcz, Nicolaus Copernicus University in Toruń, Bydgoszcz, Poland
Interests: shrimp allergy; alfa-gal; anaphylaxis; wheat dependent exercise induced anaphylaxis; cross-allergy
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Allergies and other immunity disorders are a current and deepening problem of the modern world, closely related to the progress of civilization. Although many mechanisms mediating allergic reactions have already been clearly explained, there are still many unclear mechanisms of these reactions. Also, the relationship between allergens from different sources often remains a surprising mystery. Immunodeficiency and immune disorders are also a serious health problem in the modern world. The coexistence of various disorders of the immune system (such as allergies and immunodeficiencies) often entails diagnostic difficulties. Many times we face the problem that our diagnostic tools are insufficient. This entails the construction of new experimental laboratory methods to study the relationship between different allergens and the mechanisms of allergies and other immunologically mediated diseases. In this special issue, we want to focus on the mechanisms of allergic reactions, especially those atypical and accompanying immune disorders. We will try to present significant problems and difficulties related to the diagnosis of allergies, especially in unusual cases. We also want to present the possibilities of using experimental methods and laboratory protocols to study the mechanisms of allergy and cross-reactivity.

Potential topics will include:

  • Mechanisms of allergic reactions
  • Co-factors of allergic reactions
  • Unusual allergic reactions
  • Allergies in immunodeficiency
  • Cross-reactive allergens
  • Experimental laboratory methods in allergology
  • in vitro allergy diagnosis
  • Biochemical properties of allergens
  • New potential allergens

Dr. Kinga Lis
Dr. Natalia Ukleja-Sokołowska
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Current Issues in Molecular Biology is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2200 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • allergy and hypersensitivity mechanisms
  • cross-reactivity in allergy
  • component resolved diagnostic (CRD)
  • immunodeficiencies
  • experimental research methods in allergology
  • biochemical properties of allergens

Published Papers (8 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Jump to: Review

15 pages, 5061 KiB  
Article
The Beneficial Role of Lactobacillus paracasei subsp. paracasei NTU 101 in the Prevention of Atopic Dermatitis
by Chin-Feng Liu, Tsung-Wei Shih, Chun-Lin Lee and Tzu-Ming Pan
Curr. Issues Mol. Biol. 2024, 46(3), 2236-2250; https://doi.org/10.3390/cimb46030143 - 09 Mar 2024
Viewed by 497
Abstract
Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a recurrent allergic disease characterized by symptoms such as itching, redness, swelling, dryness, scaling skin, inflammation, and tissue damage. The underlying pathogenesis of AD remains unclear. Steroid drugs are commonly used in the clinical treatment of AD; however, their [...] Read more.
Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a recurrent allergic disease characterized by symptoms such as itching, redness, swelling, dryness, scaling skin, inflammation, and tissue damage. The underlying pathogenesis of AD remains unclear. Steroid drugs are commonly used in the clinical treatment of AD; however, their long-term use may lead to associated complications. Numerous studies have indicated that probiotics could modulate the immune system, enhance immune function, or suppress excessive immune responses. In this study, Lactobacillus paracasei subsp. paracasei NTU 101 (NTU 101) was orally administered for a duration of 4 weeks, followed by the induction of AD using ovalbumin (OVA) in a mouse model. The skin condition of the stimulated site was observed during the induction period. Subsequently, the serum immunoglobulin E (IgE) content, splenocyte T cell typing, and skin histological interpretation were examined to evaluate the efficacy of NTU 101 in alleviating AD symptoms in allergen-exposed animals. The findings indicated that administering NTU 101 beforehand effectively alleviated skin symptoms in animals with AD. It reduced the infiltration of inflammatory cells in skin tissue sections, and compared to the OVA group, there was a significant reduction in the thickening of the epidermal cell layer (decreased from 89.0 ± 20.2 µM to 48.6 ± 16.0 µM) and dermis layer (decreased from 310.3 ± 69.0 µM to 209.7 ± 55.5 µM). Moreover, the proportion of regulatory T (Treg) cells and T helper 2 (Th2) cells in splenocytes significantly increased, while the proportions of T helper 1 (Th1) and T helper 17 (Th17) cells did not differ. It is speculated that the potential mechanism by which NTU 101 prevents AD involves increasing the expression of Forkhead box protein P3 (FOXP3) and promoting Treg cell maturation, thereby alleviating allergic reaction symptoms associated with AD. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

9 pages, 593 KiB  
Communication
Advocacy of Precision Allergy Molecular Diagnosis in Decision Making for the Eligibility of Customized Allergen Immunotherapy
by Ruperto González-Pérez, Paloma Poza-Guedes, Fernando Pineda and Inmaculada Sánchez-Machín
Curr. Issues Mol. Biol. 2023, 45(12), 9976-9984; https://doi.org/10.3390/cimb45120623 - 12 Dec 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1289
Abstract
Allergen immunotherapy (AIT) with aeroallergens is the only disease-modifying treatment for patients with different allergic conditions. Despite the effectiveness of AIT having been proven in both randomized controlled trials and real-world studies, it remains underused in less than 10% of subjects with allergic [...] Read more.
Allergen immunotherapy (AIT) with aeroallergens is the only disease-modifying treatment for patients with different allergic conditions. Despite the effectiveness of AIT having been proven in both randomized controlled trials and real-world studies, it remains underused in less than 10% of subjects with allergic rhinitis (AR) and/or asthma (A). We aimed to determine the current eligibility for house dust mite (HDM) AIT by means of a precision allergy molecular diagnosis (PAMD@) model in a selected cohort of youngsters with different allergic phenotypes according to the available evidence. A complex response to both HDM and storage mite allergens was depicted regardless of the subjects’ basal atopic condition. No solely specific IgE-binding responses to Der p 1, Der p 2, and/or Der p 23 were found in the studied cohort. Despite the patients with A and atopic dermatitis showing significantly higher serum titers to six mite allergens than subjects with AR, no specific molecular profile was regarded as disease specific. Given the increasing complexity of specific IgE responses to the local prevailing aeroallergens, the identification and presence of such molecules are needed in commercially available AIT in the era of precision medicine. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

18 pages, 4023 KiB  
Article
MAP3K19 Affects TWEAK-Induced Response in Cultured Bronchial Epithelial Cells and Regulates Allergic Airway Inflammation in an Asthma Murine Model
by Yuuki Sandhu, Norihiro Harada, Sonoko Harada, Takayasu Nishimaki, Hitoshi Sasano, Yuki Tanabe, Tomohito Takeshige, Kei Matsuno, Ayako Ishimori, Yoko Katsura, Jun Ito, Hisaya Akiba and Kazuhisa Takahashi
Curr. Issues Mol. Biol. 2023, 45(11), 8907-8924; https://doi.org/10.3390/cimb45110559 - 08 Nov 2023
Viewed by 892
Abstract
The mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathway is involved in the epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT) and asthma; however, the role of mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase kinase 19 (MAP3K19) remains uncertain. Therefore, we investigated the involvement of MAP3K19 in in vitro EMT and ovalbumin (OVA)-induced [...] Read more.
The mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathway is involved in the epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT) and asthma; however, the role of mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase kinase 19 (MAP3K19) remains uncertain. Therefore, we investigated the involvement of MAP3K19 in in vitro EMT and ovalbumin (OVA)-induced asthma murine models. The involvement of MAP3K19 in the EMT and the production of cytokines and chemokines were analyzed using a cultured bronchial epithelial cell line, BEAS-2B, in which MAP3K19 was knocked down using small interfering RNA. We also evaluated the involvement of MAP3K19 in the OVA-induced asthma murine model using Map3k19-deficient (MAP3K19−/−) mice. Transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-β1) and tumor necrosis factor-like weak inducer of apoptosis (TWEAK) induced the MAP3K19 messenger RNA (mRNA) expression in the BEAS-2B cells. The knockdown of MAP3K19 enhanced the reduction in E-cadherin mRNA and the production of regulated upon activation normal T cell express sequence (RANTES) via stimulation with TWEAK alone or with the combination of TGF-β1 and TWEAK. Furthermore, the expression of MAP3K19 mRNA was upregulated in both the lungs and tracheas of the mice in the OVA-induced asthma murine model. The MAP3K19−/− mice exhibited worsened eosinophilic inflammation and an increased production of RANTES in the airway epithelium compared with the wild-type mice. These findings indicate that MAP3K19 suppressed the TWEAK-stimulated airway epithelial response, including adhesion factor attenuation and RANTES production, and suppressed allergic airway inflammation in an asthma mouse model, suggesting that MAP3K19 regulates allergic airway inflammation in patients with asthma. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

12 pages, 1535 KiB  
Article
Anti-Allergic Inflammatory Effect of Agarum cribrosum and Its Phlorotannin Component, Trifuhalol A, against the Ovalbumin-Induced Allergic Asthma Model
by Joonki Kim, Sang Heon Lee, Siqi Zhang, Sim-Kyu Bong, Aaron Taehwan Kim, Hara Lee, Xiaoyong Liu, Sang Moo Kim and Su-Nam Kim
Curr. Issues Mol. Biol. 2023, 45(11), 8882-8893; https://doi.org/10.3390/cimb45110557 - 05 Nov 2023
Viewed by 1158
Abstract
Asthma is a chronic inflammatory disease involving structural changes to the respiratory system and severe immune responses mediated by allergic cytokines and pro-inflammatory mediators. Agarum cribrosum (AC) is a kind of seaweed which contains a phlorotannin, trifuhalol A. To evaluate its anti-allergic inflammatory [...] Read more.
Asthma is a chronic inflammatory disease involving structural changes to the respiratory system and severe immune responses mediated by allergic cytokines and pro-inflammatory mediators. Agarum cribrosum (AC) is a kind of seaweed which contains a phlorotannin, trifuhalol A. To evaluate its anti-allergic inflammatory effect against asthma, an ovalbumin inhalation-induced mouse asthma model was used. Histologic observations proved that trifuhalol A is minimizing the lung and tracheal structure changes as well as the infiltration of eosinophils and mast cells against ovalbumin inhalation challenge. From the serum and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, ovalbumin-specific IgE and Th2-specific cytokines, IL-4, -5, and -13, were reduced with trifuhalol A treatment. In addition, IL-1β, IL-6, and TNF-α concentrations in lung homogenate were also significantly reduced via trifuhalol A treatment. Taken together, trifuhalol A, isolated from AC, was able to protect lung and airways from Th2-specific cytokine release, and IgE mediated allergic inflammation as well as the attenuation of IL-1β, IL-6, and TNF-α in lung, which results in the suppression of eosinophils and the mast cells involved asthmatic pathology. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

15 pages, 1756 KiB  
Article
Peroxiredoxins and Hypoxia-Inducible Factor-1α in Duodenal Tissue: Emerging Factors in the Pathophysiology of Pediatric Celiac Disease Patients
by Fadime Aydın Köse, Aysun Pabuccuoglu, Miray Karakoyun and Sema Aydogdu
Curr. Issues Mol. Biol. 2023, 45(2), 1779-1793; https://doi.org/10.3390/cimb45020114 - 20 Feb 2023
Viewed by 1502
Abstract
Celiac disease (CD) is an autoimmune enteropathy. Peroxiredoxins (PRDXs) are powerful antioxidant enzymes having an important role in significant cellular pathways including cell survival, apoptosis, and inflammation. This study aimed at investigating the expression levels of all PRDX isoforms (1–6) and their possible [...] Read more.
Celiac disease (CD) is an autoimmune enteropathy. Peroxiredoxins (PRDXs) are powerful antioxidant enzymes having an important role in significant cellular pathways including cell survival, apoptosis, and inflammation. This study aimed at investigating the expression levels of all PRDX isoforms (1–6) and their possible relationships with a transcription factor, HIF-1α, in the small intestinal tissue samples of pediatric CD patients. The study groups consisted of first-diagnosed CD patients (n = 7) and non-CD patients with functional gastrointestinal tract disorders as the controls (n = 7). The PRDXs and HIF-1α expression levels were determined by using real-time PCR and Western blotting in duodenal biopsy samples. It was observed that the mRNA and protein expression levels of PRDX 5 were significantly higher in the CD patients, whereas the PRDX 1, -2, and -4 expressions were decreased in each case compared to the control group. No significant differences were detected in the PRDX 3 and PRDX 6 expressions. The expression of HIF-1α was also significantly elevated in CD patients. These findings indicate, for the first time, that PRDXs, particularly PRDX 5, may play a significant role in the pathogenesis of CD. Furthermore, our results suggest that HIF-1α may upregulate PRDX-5 transcription in the duodenal tissue of CD. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

15 pages, 1015 KiB  
Article
The Two-Sided Experimental Model of ImmunoCAP Inhibition Test as a Useful Tool for the Examination of Allergens Cross-Reactivity on the Example of α-Gal and Mammalian Meat Sensitization—A Preliminary Study
by Kinga Lis, Natalia Ukleja-Sokołowska, Kornelia Karwowska, Joanna Wernik, Małgorzata Pawłowska and Zbigniew Bartuzi
Curr. Issues Mol. Biol. 2023, 45(2), 1168-1182; https://doi.org/10.3390/cimb45020077 - 01 Feb 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 2568
Abstract
Cross-reactivity of allergens is the cause of various, sometimes unexpected, clinical reactions. There are no standard methods to investigate cross-reactivity. We present an experimental model of a two-sided inhibition test (IT) on ImmunoCAP membranes (CAP). We constructed the described model based on the [...] Read more.
Cross-reactivity of allergens is the cause of various, sometimes unexpected, clinical reactions. There are no standard methods to investigate cross-reactivity. We present an experimental model of a two-sided inhibition test (IT) on ImmunoCAP membranes (CAP). We constructed the described model based on the known cross-allergy syndrome to red meat developing in people bitten by ticks (α-Gal syndrome; AGS). Some individuals who are bitten by ticks develop IgE antibodies specific to the carbohydrate determinant, galactose-α-1,3-galactose (α-Gal), present in the tick’s saliva. These antibodies can cross-react with α-Gal molecules expressed on mammalian meat proteins. The well-known property of anti-α-Gal IgE antibodies binding by various sources of this allergen was used by us in the proposed model of the two-sided inhibition test on ImmunoCAP membranes. We expected that anti-α-Gal IgE antibodies bind allergens from mammalian meat and blocking them abolishes this reactivity, and the two-sided inhibition test model we proposed on ImmunoCAP membranes allowed us to observe such a relationship. We conducted the experiment three times on biological material from people with different clinical manifestations of allergy to α-Gal, each time obtaining similar results. In conclusion, the model of bilateral inhibition on ImmunoCAP membranes proposed by us seems to be an attractive, simple tool for direct testing of allergic cross-reactivity. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Review

Jump to: Research

22 pages, 1206 KiB  
Review
The Role of Genetic Risk Factors in Pathogenesis of Childhood-Onset Systemic Lupus Erythematosus
by Mario Sestan, Nastasia Kifer, Todor Arsov, Matthew Cook, Julia Ellyard, Carola G. Vinuesa and Marija Jelusic
Curr. Issues Mol. Biol. 2023, 45(7), 5981-6002; https://doi.org/10.3390/cimb45070378 - 17 Jul 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 2071
Abstract
The pathogenesis of childhood-onset systemic lupus erythematosus (cSLE) is complex and not fully understood. It involves three key factors: genetic risk factors, epigenetic mechanisms, and environmental triggers. Genetic factors play a significant role in the development of the disease, particularly in younger individuals. [...] Read more.
The pathogenesis of childhood-onset systemic lupus erythematosus (cSLE) is complex and not fully understood. It involves three key factors: genetic risk factors, epigenetic mechanisms, and environmental triggers. Genetic factors play a significant role in the development of the disease, particularly in younger individuals. While cSLE has traditionally been considered a polygenic disease, it is now recognized that in rare cases, a single gene mutation can lead to the disease. Although these cases are uncommon, they provide valuable insights into the disease mechanism, enhance our understanding of pathogenesis and immune tolerance, and facilitate the development of targeted treatment strategies. This review aims to provide a comprehensive overview of both monogenic and polygenic SLE, emphasizing the implications of specific genes in disease pathogenesis. By conducting a thorough analysis of the genetic factors involved in SLE, we can improve our understanding of the underlying mechanisms of the disease. Furthermore, this knowledge may contribute to the identification of effective biomarkers and the selection of appropriate therapies for individuals with SLE. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

13 pages, 2343 KiB  
Review
Selected Technical Aspects of Molecular Allergy Diagnostics
by Kinga Lis and Zbigniew Bartuzi
Curr. Issues Mol. Biol. 2023, 45(7), 5481-5493; https://doi.org/10.3390/cimb45070347 - 29 Jun 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 2794
Abstract
Diagnosis of allergic diseases is a complex, multi-stage process. It often requires the use of various diagnostic tools. The in vitro diagnostics (IVD), which includes various laboratory tests, is one of the stages of this process. Standard laboratory tests include the measurement of [...] Read more.
Diagnosis of allergic diseases is a complex, multi-stage process. It often requires the use of various diagnostic tools. The in vitro diagnostics (IVD), which includes various laboratory tests, is one of the stages of this process. Standard laboratory tests include the measurement of the serum concentration of specific immunoglobulin E (sIgE) for selected allergens, full allergen extracts and/or single allergen components (molecules). The measurement of IgE sIgE to the allergen components is called molecular allergy diagnosis. During the standard laboratory diagnostic process, various models of immunochemical tests are used, which enable the measurement of sIgE for single allergens (one-parameter tests, singleplex) or IgE specific for many different allergens (multi-parameter tests, multiplex) in one test. Currently, there are many different test kits available, validated for IVD, which differ in the method type and allergen profile. The aim of the manuscript is to present various technical aspects related to modern allergy diagnostics, especially in the area of molecular allergy diagnostics. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop